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THE ADVENTURES 



1000 "BOYS IN BLUE," 



FROM 



August, 1862, to June, 1865. 



BY MRS. ARABELLA M. WILLSON, 

Author of "Lives op the Mrs. Judsons," etc., etc. 



Jlfdiattfrt to the 126tU 33 c<\ uncut of 3>Uu* \\oxk Otitic Votuntm.$. 




With an Appendix containing a Chronological Record of the 

Principal Events in tjik History of the Regiment, 

and the Personai, History op its Officers 

and Enlisted Men*. 

PREPARED BY THE HISTORICAL COMMITTEE OF THE KF.(ilMK\T. 



ALIJAXY: 

Till-: AHIII'S COMPANY, PRINTERS. 
IS 71 1. 



Entered, according to act of Congress, in the year 1870, by 

C. A. RICHARDSON, 

In the Clerk's office of the District Court of the United States for the Northern 
District of the State of New York. 



N 



OTI C E . 




^EO reads a preface % Very few, doubtless ; and, 
therefore, we will not write one. And yet we 
have a prefatory word for the reader, to which 
we invite special attention. 

While this book and the appendix give the experi- 
ence of a single regiment, it has been the aim of the 
writer of the former, to include so much of the gene- 
ral history of the time as to make it instructive and 
entertaining to the general reader. With the same 
view, details of camp life and descriptions of army 
adventure are introduced. Young, people, young 
ladies especially, are apt to have very crude ideas 
of what war is, and how it is carried on. We have 
endeavored in this work to give some insight into 
such matters ; and we are even presumptuous enough 
to hope that its perusal may excite sufficient interest 
in the subject of which it treats, to lead some who 
have hitherto neglected it, to study the whole history 
of the most stupendous rebellion this world has ever 
witnessed. 

CajSTAndaioua, 1869. 



J 



NTRO D U CTI O N. 



" Good name, in man or woman, 
Is the immediate jewel of their souls." 
***** 

"He who filches from me my good name, 
Robs me of that which not enriches him, 
But makes me poor indeed." 

'HE checkered, eventful and stormy four years of the 
great conflict between loyalty and rebellion on this 
continent, from 1861 to 1865, are passing into history 
Soon, their record will be incorporated, with more or 
less fullness of detail, into our school books, along 
with that of the wars of the Kevolution and of 1812, 
and be studied by youth who will regard them as alike 
things of the past. That such records may be true, 
true not only in the facts stated but in the reputation 
they affix to individuals, it becomes us who have lived 
through this stormy period, to whom its sad events 
have been all too real, to gather up such valuable 
information as is scattered in the private correspondence 
and diaries of soldiers, and publish it in some form 
less perishable than the columns of newspapers. Memo- 
rial volumes thus prepared, besides greatly interesting 
the survivors of the conflict, and also serving as fitting 
and lasting tributes to the unforgotten dead, will thus 
furnish valuable material for the future historian. It 



6 Intr od uction. 

is well to rear memorial columns, inscribed with, the 
names of those young patriots who poured forth their 
generous life-blood in defense of that beloved flag 
which to them was the symbol of light, liberty and 
law ; and it is well also to perpetuate, by the written 
page, the worthy and heroic deeds of those who sur- 
vived the long struggle ; who, through disaster and 
success, through partial defeat and final triumph, 
suffered, bled and triumphed for us. 

And not alone as a tribute to our soldiers, dead and 
living, should such records be made. Perhaps those 
of us who were not called upon for any sacrifice in 
our country's cause, are in danger of forgetting our 
debt to her brave defenders. Their scars and maims 
and other disfigurements of war, which, with our pre- 
sent vivid recollections of the battles in which they 
were gained, are, in our eyes, honorable and even glo- 
rious, are, after all, sad companions for a lifetime. A 
hand, a foot or an eye, is, next to a life, the most 
precious sacrifice which can be laid on any altar. To 
lose in life's very morning one of these inestimable 
possessions, to go through life deprived of the cunning 
of the right hand or the exceeding service of the foot 
or the eye, is, no doubt, a great calamity- To recon- 
cile one to such loss, he needs not only the conscious- 
ness of having suffered in a good cause, but the 
consolation of having his scars esteemed by others as 
badges of distinction. For this reason, it is well to 
keep alive the memory of the deeds of our soldiers, 
that in their privations they may feel the support of 
our more abundant honor. 



Introduction. 7 

But when a man or a body of men has, from any 
cause, received an unmerited reproach ; when malice 
or carelessness has cast a "blot on reputation which 
influences present opinion and will continue an inefface- 
able stigma, there is the strongest motive for writing a 
plain, "unvarnished tale," which may take away the 
reproach from the memory of the dead, and restore to 
the living that which is the very light of life, the 
"immediate jewel of the soul," good name. 

To do this tardy justice to the brave 126th Regiment 
New York Volunteers, to develop the true nature of 
the circumstances which tarnished their fame in the 
outset of their career, and to trace their subsequent 
history, is the principal object of this volume. 



p 



O NTENTS 



Chapter I. 

President Lincoln's Call for Troops in July, 1862 — Eesponse in New York 
State — War Committee of Twenty-sixth Senatorial District — Recruiting 
of the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Eegiment — Colonel Sherrill and 
other Officers of the Eegiment — Gift from H. B. Gibson — Camp Swift — 
Letters from Dr. Hoyt — Harper's Ferry — Description of it and its Sur- 
roundings — Its Importance — John Brown's Eaid — Burning of Harper's 
Ferry, in 1861, to save it from the Eebels — The Regiment reaches it — 
Camp Prouty. 

Chapter II 

Effect of First Bull Run Disaster on the Public — Army of the Potomac — 
Geo. B. McClellan — President Lincoln's Order for the Advance of the 
Army — Glance at the Victories in the West and the South — Lincoln's 
Plan of Operations in Virginia — McClellan Opposes it — McClellan's 
Plan Adopted — Yorktown — Rebel Trick — Chickahominy — Sickness of 
the Soldiers — Thirty-eight Thousand Absent on Furlough — Recall of the 
Army — Delays — Pope Called to Command the Combined Armies — 
Glance at Pope's Campaign in Virginia — Second Bull Run Battle — 
Washington in Danger. 

C II A P T E R III 

The Whole Country aroused by the Tidings of this Disaster — Immense 
Supplies for the Sick and Wounded — Maryland and Pennsylvania in 
Danger — McClellan again takes Command — Lee Invades Maryland — 
His Disappointment There — The Army of the Potomac Pursues Him — 
Good Fortune of McClellan — Battle at Turner's and Crampton's Gaps — 
Our Army Victorious, but an Hour too Late. 

C II A V T E R IV 

Reflections on the Surrender of Harper's Ferry — Accusations against the 
One Hundred and Twenty-sixth New York Volunteers — Why this Nar- 
rative is Written — Sources of Information — One Hundred and Twenty- 
sixth Regiment at Harper's Ferry — Condition of Things There — Import- 
ance of Maryland Hemhts — Insufficient Defense — Colonel .Miles. 



10 Contents. 



Chapter V 

Lee's Movements for the Capture of Harper's Ferry— One Hundred and 
Twenty-sixth Regiment Ordered to Maryland Heights — Spirited Action 
There — Fight at the Breastworks — Sherrill Wounded — Fight Con- 
tinued — Mysterious Order to Abandon the Heights — Order reluctantly 
Obeyed — Acting Adjutant Barras' Conduct and False Accusations of the 
One Hundred and Twenty-sixth — Statements of Officers and Enlisted 
Men — Officers' Protest — Major Hewitt — Remarks on the Surrender of 
the Heights. 

Chapter VI. 

Harper's Ferry — Troops Concentrated there — The Enemy makes Vigor- 
ous Preparations — Enemy's Guns Planted in every Available Position, 
and all pointed Toward Harper's Ferry — Union Cavalry Cut Their Way 
Out, and Escape — Deplorable Condition of the Infantry — The Enemy 
pour Shot and Shell into the Devoted Garrison — Surrender Inevitable — 
Conduct of Colonel Miles — He is Fatally Wounded — Twelve Thousand 
Men Surrendered — Stonewall Jackson — Condition of Rebel Soldiers — 
Their Mistaken Ideas — Slave Hunters — Destruction of Harper's Ferry 
by Rebels — Colonel Miles' Conduct — His Death — New York Times' 
Correspondent — Letter from Lieutenant Seamans. 

Chapter VII. 

March of the Paroled Prisoners to Annapolis — Stay at Annapolis — Colonel 
Bull Joins the Regiment — Passage to Baltimore — Take Cars to Chicago 
— Glorious Record for Pittsburg — Journey — Arrival at Camp Douglas — 
Condition of Camp. 

Chapter VIII 

Further Account of Camp Douglas — Soldiers Unwilling to Drill until 
informed of the Terms of their Parole — Sickness Consequent on 
Enforced Idleness — Terms of Parole Published — The Men Feel more 
like Soldiers again — Letter From Lieutenant Lincoln — Charges Against 
Our Soldiers' Conduct at Camp Douglas Refuted — Incendiarism. 



Chapter IX. 

Exchange of Paroled Prisoners — Joy in Camp — Journey Back to Washing- 
ton — Pittsburg Again — Baltimore — Washington — Arlington Heights — 
Regiment Ordered to Union Mills, on Bull Run, to Guard the Outer 
Defenses of Washington — Sufferings and Sickness. 



Contexts. H 



Chapter X. 

Description of Union Mills — Exploit of Colonel D'Utassy — Routine of 
Soldiers' Life — Cleanliness and Order of Camp — Stewart's Eaid — Cap- 
ture of General Stoughton — Confidence in the One Hundred and Twenty- 
sixth Regiment — Centreville — Splendid Situation — Letter from Dr. Hoyt 
— Beauty of the Camp — Refugees from Rebeldom. 



Chapter XI. 

Glance at Military Operations in Virginia — Burnside — Hooker — Chancel- 
lorsville — Lee's Designs — Pennsylvania Threatened — Martinsburg, Ber- 
ryville and Winchester Fall into the Hands of the Enemy — Supineness 
of Pennsylvania Farmers — They are Aroused by the Presence of the 
Enemy among them — General Hooker in Command of Our Forces — 
Divisions of the Army — By Whom Commanded — Hooker Resigns Com- 
mand — Meade Succeeds Him — Extracts from Letters of Officers and 
Soldiers describing the March Northward of the Grand Army of the 
Potomac — Hays' Brigade, Including the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth, 
N. Y.j'oin Hancock's Corps — Forced Marching — Arrival of the Regi- 
ment at Gettysburg on the 2d July, 1863 — Further Account of the March 
to Gettysburg. 



Chapter XII. 

Gettysburg — Preliminary Movements — Glance at First Day's Battle — 
Disaster — Arrival of Hancock — Skillful Arrangement of Our Troops on 
Cemetery Ridge for the Second Day's Battle — Night Before the Battle — 
Forenoon of the Second Day — Sickles Advances His Corps Beyond the 
Prescribed Defensive Line — Furious Attack of the Enemy on Sickles' 
(Third) Corps — Other Corps Called to Assist the Third — Terrible Strug- 
gle for Little Round Top — The Third Brigade, including the One Hun- 
dred and Twenty-sixth Regiment, Called into Action — The Valley of 
Death — "Remember Harper's Ferry" — Fierce Struggle at Culp's Hill. 



Chapter XIII 

Council of War — Letters from Officers (Recapitulatory) — Culp's Hill — 
Skirmishing — Death of Shinier, Wheeler and Herendeen — Third Day's 
Fight at Gettysburg — Preliminary Artillery Duel — General Meade's 
Head-quarters — Extract from a Lecture on Gettysburg— Grand Charge 
of the Rebels — Death of Colonel Sherrill — Extract From Hancock's 
Testimony — Extracts from Letters. 



12 Contents. 



Chapter XIV 

The Sanitary Commission — Letter from J. H. Douglass, its Secretary, to 
Frederick Law Olmstead — Unrequited Toil of Surgeons and Nurses — 
Vast Supplies of Comforts to be Distributed — Chaplain Harrison's Letter 
— Treatment of Our Prisoners by the Rebels. 



Chapter XV 

Intentions of Meade after Three Day's Fighting at Gettysburg — Why 
Foiled — Retreat of Lee Commmenced Noiselessly — Skirmishing on the 
4th of July — Pursuit of the Rebel Army Commenced — Censures on 
General Meade — Defense — Excessive Disappointment at Lee's Escape- 
across the River — Army of Critics. 



Chapter XVI 

Expected Attack at Manassas Gap — Disappointment — The Regiment at 
Elk Run — Letter of Lieutenant Lincoln — Great Fatigue of Our Soldiers 
— Reduced Condition of the Regiment — Ordered to Falmouth to Sup- 
port Cavalry — March to Culpepper Court House — We Take Possession 
of Culpepper — Camp on Robertson's River — Whole Brigade out on 
Picket — Reduction of Meade's Forces — Lee's Designs on Washington — 
Parallel Movements of Both Armies Toward Washington — Battle at 
Auburn Ford — General Warren's Critical Situation — Battle of Bristow 
Station — Signal Victory — Colonel Bull's Modest Report — Compliment- 
ary Orders — Our Army Proceeds to Centreville — Lee Destroys the 
Orange and Alexandria Railroad — Rebuilding of it by our Forces. 



Chapter XVII 

Advance of Our Army — Crossing the Rappahannock — Gallant Actions at 
Kelly's Ford and Rappahannock Station — Letter from Dr. Peltier — The 
Army's Advance Toward Mine Run — News of the Glorious Successes at 
the West read to the Army — A Race with the Enemy for the Position 
at Robertson's Tavern — We Win it — Delay — Causes of the Delay — 
Fortifications at Mine Run — Attack Reluctantly Abandoned — Chagrin 
of Our Troops — Their Return to Camp — Winter Quarters — Captain 
Bassett's Description — Order from the War Department to Recruit the 
Second Corps to Fifty Thousand Men to be Employed on Special Service — 
The One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Regiment Appreciate this Compli- 
ment to their Corps — .Efforts to Recruit the Regiment — Social Life in 
Camp in the Winter of 1863-4. 



Contexts. ] 3 



Chapter XYIII. 

Reconnoissance at Morton's Ford — Report of General Joshua T. Owen — 
Extracts from a Private Letter — Colonel Bull's Report ->- Complimentary 
Orders — Grand Review of the Whole Corps — Consolidation of Army 
Corps — The One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Regiment with the Third 
Brigade — Transferred from the Third Division to the First Division of 
the Second Corps — General Grant Appointed to the Command of All the 
Armies — Farewell Addresses of General Hays and General Owen to 
Their Commands. 

Chapter XIX 

Condition of the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Regiment — Provost Guard 
Selected from this Regiment — Tremendous Gale — Operations in the 
Spring of 1864 — Grand, yet Simple Plans of General Grant — His Head- 
quarters with the Army of the Potomac — Disposition of Forces — Army 
of the Potomac Breaks up Winter Quarters and Crosses the Rapidan — 
Battle of the Wilderness — Po River — Spottsylvania — Grant's Dispatch 
to Washington — Gallant Charge of the Second Corps, and Capture of 
Johnson's Division, May 12th — Letter from Adjutant Lincoln — Meade's 
Complimentary Order — Comparison of Grant and Lee — Extracts from 
Diaries. 

Chapter XX 

Grant's Plans — North Anna — Tolopotomoy — Cold Harbor — Flag of 
Truce to Remove the Wounded and Bury the Dead — Life in the Rifle- 
pits — General Grant Changes his Tactics — -Butler Directed to Capture 
Petersburg — Sad Error at Petersburg — Second Corps at Petersburg — 
Charge of the Corps, June 16th — Colonel Baird Killed — Description of 
Petersburg — Statement of Losses of the One Hundred and Twenty -sixth 
during the Spring Campaign. 



Chapter XXI 

Last Act of the Great Drama Opened — Recapitulatory — Grant — Meade — 
Glance at Sherman's " Smashing" March to the Sea— Sheridan— Con- 
tinuous Fighting Before Petersburg — Attempt on South-side Railroad — 
Deep Bottom — Pause in Operations — Mine Explosion — Partly Success- 
ful, but Ended in Failure — Last Attempt of the Rebels to Invade Penn- 
sylvania— Chambersburg Burnt — Phil. Sheridan's Success — He is made 
Major-General, U.S. A.— Ruse to Divert the Enemy's Attention — Ream's 
Station — Capture of Our Cat tie— Letter from Captain Geddis — Addi- 
tional Account of the Provost Guard — Letter from Dr. Hoyt — Greeley's 
Compliment to Grant. 



14 Contexts. 



Chapteb XXII 

Pushing the Enemy Toward his Capital — Action at Hatcher's Run — 
Glance at the Capture of Fort Fisher — at General Butler's Canal at Dutch 
Gap — at General Sherman's Triumphant March Northward — at Thomas' 
and Sheridan's Operations — " The Circle of Fire is being Drawn around 
the Scorpion Secession " — Operations at Petersburg — Union Line 
extended Westward to Hatcher's Run — General Lee almost Shut up 
between the Armies of the Potomac and James — How to Prevent his 
Escape — Delicate Tact of General Grant — The Army of the Potomac to 
have its Reward — Interesting Meeting of General Officers and the Presi- 
dent — Fort Steadman — Extract from Journal of A. S. Andrews — One 
Hundred and Twenty-sixth Regiment Ordered to March — Five Forks — 
General Sheridan's Account of the Action — The Enemy in Flight — 
Our Army in Pursuit — The Battle of Sutherland's Station — Gallant 
Conduct of Herman Fox, Brigade Flag-bearer — Extract from an Officer's 
Account of the Night of April 1st — Pursuit of the Enemy Continued — 
General Grant's Correspondence with Lee, entreating him to spare further 
Bloodshed by Surrender — Final Surrender of General Lee — Closing Ope- 
rations. 

Chaptee XXIII. 

General Rejoicings — Terrible Revulsion — Assassination of our Beloved 
President — Concluding Remarks. 

Appendix 

Chronological History — List of Battles — History of the Regimental Colors 
— Biographical Sketch of Brigadier-General Alexander Hays — Personal 
History of the Officers and Enlisted Men of the One Hundred and Twenty- 
sixth New York Volunteers — Register of Officers of the Thirty-ninth 
New York Volunteers — Register of Officers of the One Hundred and 
Eleventh New York Volunteers — Register of Officers of the One Hund- 
red and Twenty-fifth New York Volunteers. 



Chapter T 



HE first of July, 1862, was a dark period in the 
history of the great struggle between loyalty and 
rebellion, at least as far as Virginia was concern- 
ed. Circumstances had hitherto seemed greater than 
the men who had to deal with them. Still, amid all 
her reverses, arising from ignorance and inexperience, 
the nation "hated not one jot of heart or hope," as 
was shown by the address signed by seventeen loyal 
Governors of States, recommending to the President to 
fill up all military organizations now in the field 
reduced by the unavoidable casualties of the service, 
and create new regiments for the defense of positions 
gained, by calling on each State for its quota of a 
body of men sufficient for such purposes, so that the 
rebellion might be "speedily crushed!" The address 
ended with the following sentence, which, alas, was 
not prophetic: "All believe that the decisive moment 
is now at hand ; and to that end the people of the 
United States are desirous to aid promptly in furnish- 
ing all reinforcements that you may deem needful to 
sustain the government." 
To this the President replied : 

" Gextlk.mex — Fully concurring in the wisdom of the views 
exnressed to me in so patriotic a manner by you in the communi- 



16 The Adventures of 

cation of the 28th June, I have decided to call into the service an 
additional force of 300,000 men. I suggest and recommend that 
the troops should be chiefly of infantry. I trust they may be 
enrolled without delay, so as to bring this unnecessary and inju- 
rious civil war "to a speedy and satisfactory conclusion. * * * 

"(Signed) A. LINCOLN." 

Three hundred thousand more brave young hearts 
and stalwart forms to take the places of those whose 
bones were bleaching on scores of battle fields, or 
whose living skeletons were languishing in the slaugh- 
ter-pens called Rebel prisons ! But great as was the 
sacrifice called for, it was cheerfully made in the ser- 
vice of our Country. 

On the 2d of July, as soon as the telegraph flashed 
the President's proclamation to the different States, 
the Governor of New York issued his proclamation, 
appealing to State pride ; announcing that as soon as 
the quotas for each State should be issued from the 
War Department at Washington, the State would be 
divided into regimental districts, conforming to the 
senatorial districts, and that war committees must be 
appointed and camps organized in each of them, to 
aid in forming volunteer regiments. The twenty-sixth 
senatorial district war committee having charge of the 
recruiting in the district selected Camp Swift, at Geneva, 
as the rendezvous of the regiment, and Hon. C. J. Fol- 
g-er as the commandant of the post. He declining, and 
also D. A. Ogden, Esq., Eliakim Sherrill, Esq., who 
had had considerable experience as a militia officer, was 
elected, and after the organization of the regiment was 
commissioned as its Colonel. Large and enthusiastic war 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 17 

meetings were held in the various towns of the district, 
where the most distinguished speakers among us exerted 
all their eloquence to induce immediate enlistment. Men 
eagerly enlisted, only stipulating that their families 
should "be cared for. James M. Bull, an active and 
energetic member of the war committee, was appointed 
Lieutenant-Colonel. At his country's call he left a good 
law practice, but being engaged in settling up his 
affairs, did not reach his Regiment until after its 
surrender at Harper's Ferry Charles A. Rich- 
ardson, also a lawyer, entered the service as Lieu- 
tenant. Of him it was said in the papers at the 
time, "industrious, of the strictest moral habits, ener- 
getic and resolute, his friends may look for him to 
make his mark." He was First Lieutenant in Com- 
pany D, of which the Captain was Philo D. Phil- 
lips, who "early enlisted in the service, was soon 
promoted to the rank of Captain, was wounded at 
Bull Run, and afterward discharged from the ser- 
vice for disability, but took this opportunity to enter 
the army again. Chas. Wheeler, a recent gradu- 
ate from college, a young man of high character, 
religious and moral, recruited a Company (K) and 
went as its Captain. S. F Lincoln, of Naples, 
N. Y., a young law student of great promise, 
was Second Lieutenant in Capt. Phillips' Company 
Capt. O. J Herendeen raised a Company (H) with 
great promptness. Wixfield Scott, a preacher in 
S}^racuse, was Captain of Company C, and a brave 
one too. But we must refer the reader to the Appen- 



18 The Adventures of 

dix of this work for a complete list of the young men 
who, nnder authorizations from the Governor, raised 
companies for the 126th Regiment, and were commis- 
sioned Captains and Lieutenants of the same ; and 
also of the men who enlisted under them. It was a 
Regiment to be proud of, comprising many men of 
principle and of thought ; men who comprehended the 
situation of the country and had counted the cost of 
its redemption ; and pledged to it, as did their fore- 
fathers of the revolution, their lives, fortunes and 
sacred honor. Indeed what is said here of the 126th 
might be said of scores, perhaps hundreds of Regi- 
ments, that they were cool, brave and intelligent to a 
remarkable degree. Had there been one great com- 
mander, capable of understanding the mighty problem 
and planning and executing the great campaigns, the 
strife would probably have been soon ended. Peace 
might have come perhaps, with everything settled on 
the old basis. It was not so to be. It seems that the 
counsels of Heaven could only be fulfilled by our 
passing through a long and bitter experience. North 
and South had participated, although not equally, hi 
a common guilt, and both must be scourged ', both 
must reach a higher plane of national civilization by 
the loss of what was dearest; even by the "sacrifice 
of the first born." 

Few of the 126th now survive. All their letters 
and diaries written at the time are full of patriotism 
and enthusiasm. One young fellow, Ceo. Irving 
Rose, under date of August 20th, 1862, writes: "Our 
Company (D) received to-day, by the hand of Judge 



Oxe Tmousaxd Boys ix Blue. 19 

Lapiiam, $200 for being the first Company raised and 
entering the service in Ontario county, under the call 
for 300,000 men ; it being a present from H. B. Gib- 
son, of Canandaigua." The same artless pen records 
receiving State, Government and County bounties, 
besides one month's pay, $13, in advance; making 
£108, of which he adds, "sent home by brother Flor- 
ence, $105, to father." (No stimulus of drink urged 
such lads into the army )* 

On the 20th of August, the Eegiment, which was 
called the 126th N. Y Volunteers, was full ; and on 
Friday, the 22d, it was drawn up in line at Camp 
Swift and mustered into the service by Lieutenant 
Alfred Foot, U. S. A. Then follow in the journals, 
the account of the sad leave-takings, the pleasant sail 
of the troops through Seneca Lake, and the railway 
journey to Baltimore by way of Elmira. Dr. Hoyt, 
Assistant-Surgeon of the Regiment, writes from Balti- 
more : "Our departure and journey to this place were 
like an ovation. Flags and handkerchiefs waving, and' 
at many points, booming cannon greeting us along" 
our route. God bless the dear ones we leave behind ; 
and while you perform the duties you owe to each 
other, we will try to do ours. It will interest our 
friends to know that not a case of drunkenness has 
occurred among us. To this cause we may attribute 
our freedom from accident and sickness/' 

* Extract from Ontario Uqxinitunj, Sept., 18<>2 : "The volunteers of the 
126th Regiment before leaving camp at Geneva, allotted over $15,000 of 
their monthly pay to their families and friends at home. This shows pretty 
conclusively the quality of the men it is made up of." 
2 



20 The Advextures of 

The 126th Regiment. 

The regimental and line officers of the 126th, now at 
Harper' s Ferry, are as follows : 

Colonel. — E. Sherrill, Geneva. 

Lieutenant- Colonel. — James M. Bull, Cauandaigua. 
Major. — W H. Baird, Geneva. 
Quartermaster. — J. K. Lorixg, Waterloo. 
Surgeon. — Fletcher M. Hammond, Penn Yan. 
First-Assistant Surgeon. — Ciias. S. Hoyt, Yates Co. 
Second- Assistant Surgeon. — Pierre D. Peltier. 
Chaplain. — T. Spexcer Harrisox, Dundee. 
Sergeant- Major. — D. C. Fareixgtox, Geneva. 
Quartermaster-Sergeant. — Jonx Stevexsox, Jr. 
Commissary -Serge ant.— Richard Macey. 
Butler. — J. D. Cobb, Geneva. 

Line Officers. 

Company A. — Captain, T. 1ST. Burrill ; First Lieutenant, S. A. 
Barras ; Second Lieutenant, G. J). Carpenter. 

Company B. — Captain, W A. Coleman ; First Lieutenant, R. 
A. Bassett ; Second Lieutenant, M. H. Lawrence, Jr. 

Company C. — Captain, W Scott ; First Lieutenant, T. R. 
Lounsbury; Second Lieutenant, A. W Porter. 

Company I). — Captain, P. D. Phillips ; First Lieutenant, C. A. 
Richardson ; Second Lieutenant, S. F. Lincoln. 

Company F. — Captain, H. D. Kipp ; First Lieutenant, Geo. C. 
Prichett ; Second Lieutenant, J. H. Brough. 

Company F. — Captain, Isaac Shinier ; First Lieutenant, Ira 
Munson ; Second Lieutenant, T. E. Munson. 

Company G. — Captain, J. F. Aikins ; First Lieutenant, Fred. 
Stewart ; Second Lieutenant, S. H. Piatt. 

Company H. — Captain, O. J. Herendeen ; First Lieutenant, 
G. X Redfield ; Second Lieutenant, A. R. Clapp. 

Company I. — Captain, B. F. Lee ; First Lieutenant, G. Skaats ; 
Second Lieutenant, G. L. Yost. 

Company K. — Captain, Chas. M. Wheeler ; First Lieutenant, 
H. C. Lawrence ; Second Lieutenant, I. A. Seamans. 



Oxe Thousand Boys ix Blue. 91 

The Regiment reached Baltimore, August 27th. Col- 
onel Sherrill immediately reported to General Wool, 
■commanding the Middle Department, and by his 
orders the troops took the cars at 6 o'clock for Har- 
per's Ferry, where they were to report to Colonel 
Miles for instruction and duty 

This place, so often traversed by hostile armies, and 
the scene of many important events during the war of 
the rebellion, deserves a brief description. In order 
to understand a series of military operations, it is 
absolutely necessary to be somewhat acquainted with 
the geography of the country in which they take place. 
And the historic interest of this place and its vicinity, 
as well as its extraordinary natural features, make its 
geography well worthy of study Near it lie Antietam, 
Winchester, South Mountain, names famous in our 
annals; while Harper's Ferry itself was the gateway 
of that Shenandoah valley through which the ivbel 
hordes so often poured into Pennsylvania and threat 
ened Washington. We shall, therefore, endeavor so 
to describe it that, with the aid of a map, the reader 
may gain a correct idea of it.* 

The Potomac, coming from the west, and forming, 
for a long distance, the southern boundary of Mary- 
land, takes, near Williamsport, a southeasterly, and 
near Antietam (or Sharpsburg) a souther]}- direction, 
until at the point called Harper's Ferry it receives the 
waters of the Shenandoah from the southwest, and, 
cutting its way through the mountain barriers that 
opposed its progress toward the sea, it makes a sharp 

* Sec maps, pages 42 and 5o. 



22 The Adventures of 

curve to the east, and afterward winds in a southeast- 
erly direction to Chesapeake bay These mountain 
barriers of which we have spoken, are ranges of the 
Blue Ridge which traverse Pennsylvania and Mary- 
land and pass into Virginia. The first, through which 
the Potomac has cut its way after receiving the Shen- 
andoah, is Elk Ridge, the towering abutment of which, 
on the north side of the river, is called Maryland 
Heights, while the less precipitous elevation on the 
south side is called Loudon Heights. The next formid- 
able obstacle which, at the distance of a few miles,. 
was encountered by the stream, was another branch 
of the Blue Ridge, which seems also to have opened a 
gateway for its majestic progress, the northern bank 
being called by the Marylanders {why they best 
know) the South Mountain range, and the southern 
the Short Hills. Between the river and its left or 
north bank, there is barely room for a railroad, a 
turnpike and a canal. Between Elk Ridge and South 
Mountain lies Pleasant Valley, in the southern open- 
ing of which, on the Potomac, is the village of Sandy 
Hook, two or three miles from Harper's Ferry. 

In the angle formed by the Shenandoah and the 
Potomac, at their junction, lies Harper's Ferry. This- 
is a mere selvedge of land on the banks of the two 
rivers, where, before the war, our government had an 
armory, an arsenal, various machine shops and exten- 
sive flouring mills. Back of this margin of land, 
rocky bluffs rise precipitously one or two hundred 
feet, to a somewhat level plateau or table land stretch- 
ing toward the west one or two miles, and bounded 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 23 

rat its western extremity by a low, sharp ridge called 
Bolivar Heights. This ridge, commencing near the 
Potomac on the east, continues two miles toward the 
south, then drops down affording a passage for a 
turnpike to Halltown, Charlestown and Winchester, 
then, after half a mile, rises into a little hill, whence 
it slopes in easy undulations to the Shenandoah. 

By a study of the map, it will be seen that while 
the bold bluffs of Maryland Heights descend to the 
Potomac from the north, the western slopes of the 
same ridge also look down on the same river, as well 
as on the village of Harper's Ferry and the heights 
back of it. This results from the sudden change in 
the course of the river from south to east. Standing 
on the table land back of Harper's Ferry, you have 
thus on your left front the Potomac, beyond which 
rise the western slopes of Elk Ridge ; on your right 
hand the clear Shenandoah with Loudon Height* 
beyond, and bounding your southeastern prospect ; 
directly in front of you the two united rivers (now 
one broad and beautiful stream), flow eastward 
between the craggy steeps of Maryland Heights and 
the gentler and wooded slopes of Loudon ; while 
behind you rise Bolivar Heights, not comparable to 
either in altitude, but forming the third side of the 
equilateral triangle, of which Mar} land and Loudon 
Heights are the other two sides. 

The importance of Harper's Ferry, before the war, 
was not owing wholly to its arsenal and its machine 
shops, where thousands of stands of arms were annu- 
ally manufactured ; but to its commanding the entrance 



24 The Adventures of 

to the Shenandoah valley on the south and the valley 
of the Cumberland on the north, by way of which the 
Confederates could penetrate into Pennsylvania. Here 
also passed the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, over 
which was carried on much of the commerce between- 
the west and the sea- board. This road, uniting with 
that from Winchester, crosses at Harper's Ferry from 
the west to the east bank of the Potomac, by a bridge 
more than a thousand feet in length ; and then fol- 
lows the Potomac round the base of Maryland Heights, 
room having been made for it, as well as for a canal 
and a wagon road, by excavations into the bluffs. 
Over the southern end of Maryland Heights, a zig-zag 
and difficult road also leads from Harper's Ferry to> 
Sandy Hook in Pleasant Valley 

The various manufactories at Harper's Ferry had 
gathered round them a considerable population, which 
finding little room for building on the margins of the 
rivers, had occupied the northern part of the plateau 
above the bluffs, with a village sometimes called Boli- 
var, beyond which were some government buildings. 

Here, in 1859, occurred that strange, mad raid of 
John Brown, of Ossawattamie, who with a force of 
twenty-two men, seized the United States Arsenal con- 
taining 90,000 stands of arms ; not in rebellion against 
our government, but to aid a few runaways from sla- 
very. Chivalrous Virginia hanged John Beown and 
a few of his followers ; and held on to her slaves three 
years longer ! 

Not much better defended was the arsenal when the 
rebellion broke out in '61. But Captain Charles P. 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 25 

Kingsbury, who commanded there a force of forty 
men,* had notice of the intended attack upon it; not 
indeed in time to summon aid, and save to our gov- 
ernment its priceless stores ; but in time to set fire to 
the place, destroy many of the workshops and arms, 
and escape with his men into Pennsylvania. [During 
the occupancy of Harper's Ferry by the Union forces, 
the engine house, John Brown's fortress, was used as 
a prison for rebels.] 

To this post, so interesting and so important, the 
126th Regiment were ordered by General Wool. They 
arrived by the Baltimore and Ohio railway at the 
station near the arsenal, on the morning of August 
28th ; found the place ' ' looking ravaged, but with 
beautiful rock and mountain scenery " 

By a winding road they climbed to the table land 
we have described, some of them singing "Old John 
Brown," in the very scene of his frantic attempt and 
near that of his martyr-like death. 

They reached their camping ground, which lay high 
above the Shenandoah, and from which, as one of the 
privates records, they had a fine view of the camps on 
Bolivar and Maryland Heights, and, in remembrance 
of a kind friend in Geneva, named it Camp Prouty 

But, in order to understand the military situation at 
Harper's Ferry, it will be necessary to glance back- 
ward at the events of several months preceding. Of 
course, in our brief review, we must confine ourselves 
to the States of Maryland and Virginia ; but it must 

* See Rebellion Record, volume 10, page 320. 



26 The Adventures of One Thousand Boys in Blue. 

not be forgotten that the whole south and southwest 
was a theatre of war, and that it was our splendid 
successes in those parts of the country that sustained 
the courage of our people amid the reverses in Vir- 
ginia. 



Chapter TT 



jN the commencement of our great struggle, when 
the fall of Sumter electrified the national heart, 
such a crowd of enthusiastic, ardent patriots 
rushed to the defense of the flag and the suppression 
of the rebellion, that the too sanguine north antici- 
pated an easy victory, and joined with the civil 
authorities at Washington in the cry, "On to Rich- 
mond !" Our commanders, although aware of the 
rawness and indiscipline of our troops, were forced to 
yield to the overwhelming pressure of public sentiment, 
and advanced on Manassas. The Bull Run disaster 
sank the nation in despondency, deep in proportion to 
its previous elation. We were taught what our long 
peace had made us forget, that individual bravery and 
enthusiasm are no guarantees of success in war, unless 
accompanied by rigid military discipline. It was found 
that an army, before it can be used, must be created ; 
that war is a science and an art ; and that the field 
of battle is not the place to learn its tactics. A leader 
was wanted who could fashion and organize the vast 
body of men who had rushed forward at their coun- 
try's call into an army. For this work no General 
was probably better fitted than he who was called to 
it, Geo. B. McClellan ; and in a few months the nation 



28 The Adventures of 

could point with pride to "the Grand Army of the 
Potomac." 

A grand army indeed, it was ; a grand military 
school, rather, in which one of the very best military 
teachers was drilling his 150,000 scholars in the rout- 
ine of military duty In excellence of discipline, in 
the arrangements of the camp, in exactness of drill, 
the army was a spectacle admired by all visitors. The 
personal magnetism of the young commander, his 
inspection of each Begiment and Company, and seem- 
ingly of each individual in a Company ; his attention 
to the minutia of their dress and equipments when on 
parade, and to their comfort when sick ; the gallantry 
with which he galloped about his vast camps giving 
orders to officers, and marks of flattering attention to 
subordinates ; all this, with the fame of his exploits 
in West Virginia, combined to excite to the utmost 
the enthusiasm of his men, and bind him to them by 
strong personal attachment. Had it indeed been a 
school, of which nothing was expected but perfection 
in martial exercises, it would have continued to be the 
pride of the country But unfortunately the very life 
of the country was menaced, nay, was attacked, by a 
foe who was increasing every day in strength and dis- 
cipline. The weather, so unusually favorable that 
autumn for military movements, would soon change. 
Soon the rains would commence, and the hard soil be 
turned to beds of miry clay. In October the troops 
had been sufficiently disciplined to be able to fight 
any enemy, but still they lay encamped ; yet the 
nation, taught humility by former mistakes, was 



O.xe Thousand Boys in Blue. 29 

patient with delays that seemed to it inexplicable. 
For the confederate forces had pushed up so near our 
national Capital as virtually to blockade the Potomac, 
and put Baltimore and Washington almost in a state 
of siege. Centreville, Ocoquan and Manassas, were 
occupied by them, and at Manassas they employed them- 
selves in fortifying with works of much apparent 
strength. At length in January, 1862, the forbearance 
of our u omni-patient " Lincoln was exhausted, and 
he issued an order for a general movement of all the 
land and naval forces of the United States against the 
confederate forces, to take place on the 22d of Febru- 
ary ' ' This order was promptly obeyed in the west ; 
and followed by the capture of Forts Henry and Don- 
nelson on the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers ; which 
led to the evacuation of Bowling Green, the surrender 
of Nashville and the fall of Columbus, the rebel 
stronghold on the Mississippi." Fort Pulaski, which 
guarded the entrance to Savannah, fell in the spring 
of '62, as did Island No. 10, which commanded the 
Mississippi. Buknside had effected in February, a 
lodgment in North Carolina, Western Kentucky had 
been released from rebel rule, and Missouri was in the 
hands of the unionists. Nowhere were the rebels so 
daring during the winter of '61 and '62, as in Vir- 
ginia, where lay the grandest army of modern times. 
On the 31st of January, the President ordered that all 
the disposable force of the army of the Potomac, 
except what was necessary for the defense of Wash- 
ington, should be moved to a point below Manassas 
Junction, on the Orange and Alexandria railway, and 



30 The Adventures of 

thus be in a situation to attack the enemy in the rear. 
Instead of obeying this order, McClellan requested 
and obtained permission to state his objections to it. 
Lincoln, of course distrusting his own opinions on 
military matters, listened to these objections, and 
finally yielded his own plan. McClellan had formed 
an exceeding and fatal over-estimate of the strength 
of the enemy at Manassas. This estimate must have 
been based on rumors and on reports of deserters, for 
he does not appear to have reconnoitred the enemy's 
position to obtain certain intelligence. The fact was, 
he had a favorite plan of his own, diametrically 
opposed to that of Lincoln. This was, to take up 
the mighty body under his command, transport it by 
water to Fortress Monroe, and then proceed by land 
to Richmond through the peninsula. In discussions 
and councils of war, the month of February passed 
away, and also a week in March ; when the enemy, 
tired out with waiting to be attacked, removed quietly 
from Manassas and thus raised the "blockade" of 
the Potomac. Instantly McClellan gave orders for 
an immediate advance of the whole army toward Man- 
assas ; not, as he said afterward in his report, with 
intention of pursuing the rebels, but to afford the 
troops some experience in marching, and "as a good 
intermediate step between the quiet and comparative 
comfort of the camps around Washington and the 
vigor of active operations. "* So, after what the 
Prince De Joinville calls a "promenade" to Man- 
assas, and an inspection of the guns (wooden and 

* General McClellan's Report, August 4, '63. 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 3|_ 

other), that had so long held them in check, the army 
"promenaded" back to Alexandria. So little esti- 
mate had this excellent disciplinarian of the value of 
time* 

At length, in the early part of April (instead of 22d 
of February), came the grand movement, when more 
than 100,000 men were transported by water from 
Washington to "the peninsula," a name given to the 
tract of country lying between the York and James riv- 
ers, and through which flows the dismal stream of the 
Chickahominy. But now the commander proved that 
if he had over-estimated the difficulties in the Presi- 
dent's plan, he had under-estimated those in his own. 
The unfavorable climate, with its terrible rains ; the 
swampy nature of the ground, easily rendered impas- 
sable ; and the fortified positions on the way from 
Fortress Monroe to Richmond, seem all to have been 
overlooked in his estimate of difficulties. His first 
check was at Yorktown, which he presumed to be 
defended as Manassas was ; and for the siege of which 
he prepared with consummate skill ; but the enemy 
repeated his Manassas trick, and quietly abandoned 
the position. Time and space will not allow us to fol- 
low the army through the dread peninsula. The 
details of its battles are familiar to us all. "Williams- 
burg, Fair Oaks, Mechanicsville, Gaines Mill, Savage 
Station, Malvern Hill, names which have only to be 
mentioned to call up pictures of sanguinary contests 

* A lady in New England who was at school with McCltj.lan when lie 
was a boy, says his nickname among his school mates was, "Tardy 
George." 



\'2 The Ad textures of 



o£ 



with insignificant results, left our army, or rather the 
remains of it, at Harrison's Landing, no nearer the 
conquest of Richmond than when it first entered the 
Peninsula. Still, such was the attachment of the 
army to McClellan, that they kept their faith in him 
through all reverses, and many in the nation shared 
their enthusiasm. And disastrous and disappointing 
as was the Chickahominy campaign, there were many 
beside the army who were unwilling to cast the blame 
of its ill success upon the pet commander. 

The recall of the army of the Potomac from Harri- 
son's Landing to Acquia Creek, was highly distasteful 
to McClellan, and has been much censured by his 
admirers, but seems to have been actually necessary. 
The climate, at that season, of that part of Virginia, is 
deadly to Northerners. McClellan reported between 
10,000 and 12,000 on his sick list, besides 38,000 ! 
absent on furloughs sanctioned by himself. The bat- 
teries and fortifications at Fort Darling and Drury's 
Bluff were to be reduced before Richmond could be 
attacked. He, himself, estimated that in order to 
do anything effectual where he was, he must have 
very large reinforcements, one dispatch asserting that 
"100,000, rather more than less," would be necessary 
He contended that the true defense of Washington lay 
in keeping the enemy engaged at Richmond,* and that 
all the forces in Northern Virginia, and even Burn- 
side's in North Carolina, ought to be dispatched to 

* To show that McClellan's operations near Richmond did not keep all 
Lee's army there, we give an extract from Gen. Pope's testimony : " Lee 
did detach Stonewall Jackson (from the army at Richmond) with a large 



Oxk Thousaxd Boys ix Blue. tjSJ 

him. But there certainly had been nothing in the 
Yorktown and Chickahominy campaign to inspire such 
confidence in the young general, as to warrant uncov- 
ering the whole country to furnish him the means of 
experimenting at Richmond. Looking at the question 
dispassionately, it seems that by following Halleck's 
plan (withdrawing his forces quietly and speedily, 
masking his movements from the enemy) he might 
have reached a new and healthy base of operations 
near Acquia Creek, a little northeast of Fredericks- 
burg, where the Northern forces could have rein- 
forced or co-operated with him without uncovering the 
Capital, thus preventing any advance of Lee's army 
toward Maryland or Pennsylvania, and compelling 
him either to remain inactive or to attack our undi- 
vided army. But McClellajst, thwarted in his grand 
plan of capturing Richmond by siege (his favorite 
mode of warfare), entered with so little spirit into 
Hallkck's views, that the command to move North, 
issued on the 2d of August, was not complied with 
until the 14th, and the troops did not reach their 
destination until the 26th. Of this delay, and 
the publicity given to the movement, the enemy 
availed himself with his usual promptness and 
celerity 

In the meantime General Pope, who had com- 
manded in North Missouri, and whose splendid suc- 

force, which he continued to rein force, before ({en. McCleli.an began to 
evacuate Harrison's Landing at all; in fact, before he had any order to do 
so. * * * The battle of Cedar Mountain was fought on the nth of 
August, 100 miles from Richmond, live days before McClellax had with- 
drawn a man," &c, &c 



34 The Advextuees of 

cess at Island No. 10, and subsequently, had given 
him a great reputation for dash and bravery, was 
called to Washington to take command of the three 
departments and armies then under Fremont, Banks 
and McDowell, the whole to be styled "The Army 
of Virginia." Pope's orders were to cover Washing- 
ton, and protect the Shenandoah Valley from incur- 
sions. He assumed command on the 6th of June, the 
united armies amounting to about 50,000 effective men. 
We have no space for the various movements of the 
armies, although they form an exciting chapter in the 
history of Virginia campaigns. The 21st of August 
found Pope behind the Rappahannock, with the 
enemy in strong force on the south side of that river. 
Stuart's adjutant-general had been captured, with 
important papers showing it to be Lee's design to 
destroy the army of Virginia before it should be rein- 
forced by McClellan's army Halleck's dispatches 
directing McClellak to hasten to Pope's aid became 
urgent and imperative. Should the army of Virginia 
be conquered, Washington and Maryland would be at 
the mercy of the rebels. McClellan claims that rein- 
forcements were sent to Pope as fast as was possible. 
We need not go into the controversy except to say 
that there could hardly be a hearty co-operation 
between two commanders whose ideas and plans of 
warfare were so diametrically opposite. McClellan 
respected the slave and other property of the rebels 
so far as to employ squads of soldiers to protect it 
from our own army ; setting guards around rebel resi- 
dences ; sometimes preventing our troops from entering 



Oxe Thousand Boys ix Blue. 35 

their grounds for water, or taking a rail from their 
fences to cook their food. Pope, on the contrary, 
was of opinion that the army should be unincumbered 
with vast wagon trains ; that the soldiers should sub- 
sist on the country they traversed, paying the peace- 
able and civil for what was taken, and avenging sum- 
marily any outrages or insults to our army or their 
flag. In a word, Pope was for treating the rebels as 
enemies, who were to be overcome at any cost ; 
McClellan regarded them as misguided citizens, who 
might be won back to allegiance by tenderness and 
respect. 

Pope however, at length received reinforcements, 
not, as he claims, to the extent required ; many bat- 
tles were fought with varjdng results ; but our armies 
fell back nearer and nearer to the Capital ; till at 
length, on the 30th of August, on the old Bull Run 
battle-field, a sanguinary battle was fought, which, 
like that of July 21st, 1861, on the same ground, ter- 
minated unfavorably for us ; and the remains of the 
combined armies, including many of those who had 
fought through the bloody fields from Yorktown to 
within sight of the spires of Richmond, as well as 
those who had gone through the fifteen days fights 
from the Rapidan to Centerville, were withdrawn 
within the lines of Washington. The field of Bull 
Run, with its wounded and its dead, was left in the 
hands of the enemy The confederate commander 
transmitted to Jeff. Davis an account of his great 
victory over the combined armies of Pope and 



36 The Adventures of One Thousand Boys in Blue. 

McClellan, which called forth from Davis a pro- 
clamation to the Confederate Congress in a strain of 
triumphant jubilation, not forgetting to note that the 
field was the scene of a former success. Lee, flushed 
with victory, seemed at liberty to advance upon 
Washington or into Maryland. 



C HAPTEN T T T 



(JX^E must leave the 126th Regiment in Harper's 
gx) Ferry a little longer, while we go on with the 
^ history of the armies in Maryland. 
Great was the excitement in all parts of the country 
as the telegraph spread the news of the second Bull 
Run disaster, and of the vast numbers of wounded 
and dying left on the field so near to Washington. 
The authorities of that city gave permission to citi- 
zens to visit the battle grounds at Bull Run and 
Centerville with necessaries and comforts ; and this 
being known, vast quantities of medicines, cordials, 
food and clothing were sent over the railroads to the 
Capital from all parts of the country Little was 
effected, however, owing to the presence of hostile 
forces, and some citizens were captured and made 
prisoners, even while engaged in their benevolent 
work. It was a time of alarm, also, and almost of 
discouragement. The Union strongholds in Virginia, 
with a few exceptions, had all been dismantled or des- 
troyed and abandoned. Maryland and Pennsylvania 
seemed to lie open to invasion. In the latter State 
the wildest excitement prevailed, and thousands of 
volunteers offered themselves to defend her. Pope 
gladly resigned his command. In calling McClkllax 



38 The Adventures of 

to the command of the combined armies, thp authori- 
ties were doubtless prompted, first by his known popu- 
larity with the army, and next, by his skill in military 
organization. For the army was to be reorganized, 
and it must be done rapidly, as it were, while on the 
wing. Its shattered and mutilated columns must be 
replenished with new recruits, who should learn tac- 
tics from the veterans with whom they were associa- 
ted, repaying the debt with their fresh, unworn vigor. 
On the 4th of September McClellan assumed com- 
mand of the old troops and new levies that were con- 
stantly arriving under the proclamation of July 1st, 
and the draft of August 4th. 

Soon after the battle of Bull Run, Lee moved his 
army first to Leesburg, thence across the Potomac, 
near Point of Eocks. Generals Longstreet, Ewell, 
A. P Hill, D. H. Hill, and the redoubtable Jack- 
son, had command of the columns that moved in the 
direction of Frederick, Maryland. This was the sec- 
ond city in the State in wealth and commerce, and 
the third in population ; less than fifty miles north- 
west of Washington, and sixty west of Baltimore. 
Much excitement prevailed in the city ; many of the 
inhabitants fled, and large quantities of provisions 
were destroyed by the citizens. But it was soon found 
that Lee's errand was peaceful. The leaders of his 
army proclaimed that they came as friends, and called 
on the inhabitants to rise, and throw off the tyranny 
under which they were groaning. Recruiting offices 
were opened where men might enlist in the southern 
army But no response came from "my Maryland;" 



Oxe Thousaxd Boys ix Blue. 39 

and the rebel leader, sorely disappointed to find the 
people so insensible to their own misery, left Freder- 
ick and moved on toward Hagerstown. Perhaps had 
Lee's army been less ragged, dirty and barefoot, 
enlistment might have worn a more enticing aspect. 
Terrible excitement prevailed in Pennsylvania. Vol- 
unteers in great numbers rushed to offer themselves as 
soldiers. Governor Bradford, of Maryland, called 
for troops to defend their homes, and his call was 
promptly responded to. 

Finding Maryland unprepared for revolt, and Balti- 
more too strongly defended for direct attack, Lee, 
leaving a rear guard at Frederick, moved his army 
toward Western Maryland, where he could communi- 
cate with Richmond through the Shenandoah Valley, 
or threaten Pennsylvania through that of Cumberland. 
In this way he hoped to draw our forces away from 
the Capital and fight them far from their base of sup- 
plies ; or in their absence, make a sudden dash and 
seize Washington. He seems to have supposed Har- 
per's Ferry would be abandoned when it was known 
his army was in Maryland ; but learning that it was 
garrisoned by many thousand men, he saw the neces- 
sity of dislodging them before he could carry out his 
plans. 

On the 7th of September, MoClellan was apprized 
of the disappearance of the enemy from his front ; 
and leaving Banks in command of the defenses of 
Washington, he crossed the Potomac and set out in 
pursuit of Lee. At first he proceeded cautiously, lest 
Lee's removal might be a stratagem, and only reached 



40 The Adventures of 

Frederick on the 12th, just as the rebels had evacu- 
ated. But here a most extraordinary piece of good 
fortune awaited him. A copy of Lee's general order, 
issued only four day's before, and containing his 
whole plan of operations, had been left behind and 
fell into McClella:s t 's hands. It was dated Septem- 
ber 9th, 1862 : 

[Confidential.] 

Head-Quarters, Army of Northern Virginia, j 
September 9th, 1862. j 

Special Order, ^ 
No. 191. f 

III. The army will resume its march to-morrow, taking the 
Hagerstown road. General Jackson's command will form the 
advance ; and after passing Middleton with such portion as he 
may select, take the route toward Sharpsburg, cross the Potomac 
at the most convenient point, and by Friday morning take pos- 
session of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad ; capture such of the 
enemy as may be at Alartinsburg and intercept such as may 
attempt to escape from Harper's Ferry. 

IV General Longstreet's command will pursue the main road 
as far as Boonsboro', where it will halt with reserve, supply and 
baggage trains of the army. 

V General McLaws with his own division and that of General 
R. H. Anderson, will follow General Longstreet; on reaching 
Middleton will take the route to Harper's Fei-ry, and by Friday 
morning possess himself of the Maryland Heights, and endeavor 
to capture the enemy at Harper's Ferry and vicinity. 

VI. General Walker, with his division, after accomplishing- 
the object in which he is now engaged, will cross the Potomac at 
Check's Ford, ascend its right bank to Lovettsville, take posses- 
sion of Loudon Heights if practicable, by Friday morning, keep 
the ford on his left, and the road between the end of the moun- 
tain and the Potomac on his right. He will, as far as practicable, 
co-operate with General McLaws and General Jackson in inter- 
cepting the retreat of the enemy. 

VII. General D. H. Hill's division will form the rear guard of 



Oxe Thousand Boys ix Blue. 41 

the army, pursuing the road taken by the main body. The 
reserve artillery, ordnance and supply trains, will precede Gene- 
ral Hill. 

VIII. General Stuakt will detach a squadron of cavalry to- 
accompany the commands of Generals Loxgstrebt, Jacksox and 
McLaws, and with the main body of the cavalry, will cover the 
route of the army and bring up all stragglers that may have been 
left behind. 

IX. The commands of Generals Jacksox, McLaws and Wal- 
ker, after accomplishing the objects for which they have been 
detached, will join the main body of the army at Boonsboro' or 
Hagerstown. 

X. Each regiment on the march will habitually carry its axes 
in the regimental ordnance wagons, for use "of the men at their 
encampments, to procure wood, &c. 

By command of General II. E. LEE. 

R. H. Chilton, A. A. General. 

For Major-General D. H. Hill, commanding division. 

By this order, McClellan ascertained that Harper's 
Ferry, with its garrison and stores, was the prize Lee 
was aiming at, and that to gain it he was hazarding 
the dangerous experiment of dividing his army while 
in a* hostile territory, and placing an uncertain river 
between its divisions. In doing this, he evidently 
counted on our customary slowness of operations in 
Virginia, for he planned that Harper's Ferry should be 
invested, taken and his forces recruited and advanced 
northward toward the tempting fields of Pennsylvania 
before our army should come up with him. 

Knowing Lee's entire plan, McClellan was now 
complete "master of the situation." And it does not 
seem very difficult to tell what he should have done 
under the circumstances. At least we are pretty sure 
what " Stoxewall Jackson " would have done. 



42 



The Adventures of 



Before our army was a range of mountains, called 
the South Mountain range, through which there are 
two principal passes or gaps, the northern called Tur- 
ner's, the southern Crampton's gap. On the further 




SCALE OF MILES. 
5 10 

1 I ' ' ' ' I ' ' ' r 



REBEL MOVEMENTS ON HARPER'S FERRY AND ANTLETAM. 

A A Jackson's march from Frederick to Harper's Ferry. C C McLaw's and Ander- 
son's march from Frederick to Maryland Heights. D D Walker's march from the 
Monocacy to Loudon Heights. A C D Enemy's line of March from Harper's Ferry to 
Antietam. B B Longstreet's march to Antietam. H H Franklin's march from Pleasant 
Valley to Antietam. 

or western side of these mountains is Pleasant Valley, 
three or four miles wide, "beyond which rises Elk 
Ridge, parallel to the South Mountain range, and ter- 
minating in Maryland Heights, which overlook and 
command Harper's Ferry To rush forward by the 
southern and shortest route, gain Crampton's pass 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 43 

while slightly defended, overtake McLaws, fight and 
defeat him, and thus spoil one part of Lee's pretty 
programme, would seem to have been the dictate of 
military policy McClellan, with the hulk of his 
army, took the longer route by Turner' s gap ; Frank- 
lin, with the rest of the army, were on the southern 
route, hut neither reached South Mountain until the 
14th, although the distance is hut fifteen miles from 
Frederick, where the army was when the order was 
found. Lee, constantly kept informed by scouts of 
what was going on in our army, had time to dispatch 
considerable bodies of his troops to dispute the passes 
of the mountains. Burnside's command (Hooker's 
and Reno's corps) found themselves opposed by D. 
H. Hill's division of 5,000 men, soon reinforced by 
two of Longstreet's divisions. The ground was 
exceedingly precipitous and rocky, but Hooker's 
troops sprang from crag to crag, opposed by the 
confederate riflemen, who, from behind every bush 
and stone, took deadly aim at our soldiers. By dark 
Hooker's troops had gained the height on the right 
of the pass, Gibbon's brigade was just behind them, 
and Reno held the height on the left. Night pre- 
vented farther advance, but the pass was virtually 
carried. This success, however, had cost the sacrifice 
of at least 1,500 killed and wounded, among whom 
was the gallant General Rk\o. Meanwhile Frank- 
lin was forcing his wa}* through Crampton's pass, 
defended by McLavvs, who was also operating against 
our forces in his front on Maryland Heights. Here 
the contest was much like that at Turner's pass; the 



44 The Adventures of One Thousand Boys in Blue. 

enemy were driven backward up the hill, and after a 
spirited contest of three hours, in which we lost seve- 
ral hundred men, the crest was carried, and Frank- 
lin's corps rested on its arms, with its advance 
thrown forward into Pleasant Valley The garrison 
at Harper's Ferry, beleaguered by the rebel armies, 
had heard the firing all day, and supposed relief was 
near ; but, alas ! it came too late, for on the very next 
morning, our whole army being within a few miles of 
them, they were basely surrendered. The particulars 
of this disaster must be given in another chapter. 



Chapter IV 



£TfHE surrender of Harper's Ferry was, all circum- 
-^S^ stances considered, a disgraceful and disastrous 
event. The question, on whom ought the dis- 
grace to rest, is, notwithstanding the finding of the 
investigating commission, and the consequent verdict 
of public opinion, still an open one. Some of the 
witnesses before the commission testified that it was 
the 126th Regiment New York Volunteers, who, by 
a shameful panic and flight, so demoralized the 
whole body of troops on Maryland Heights, as to 
cause the abandonment of that position, and the 
consequent surrender of Harper's Ferry. The decision 
of the Commission was in accordance with such tes- 
timony ; no opportunity being given for those most 
interested to bring forward one witness in their own 
behalf, or to offer one word in their own defense. 
They were, in fact, far from the scene, in Chicago, 
and not even aware that their conduct was under- 
going investigation. When the officers of the Regi- 
ment learned the cruel and calumnious charges 
against them, and that a general order from the 
War Department had branded them with infamy, 
they made application for a court of inquiry which 
might examine the character of the witnesses who 



46 The Adventures of 

had screened their own dereliction of duty by false 
accusations of others. No answer was received by 
the applicants, nor could they learn the fate of their 
application. At length, in the winter of 1864, they 
learned that a decision had been made upon it and 
forwarded to the Governor of New York.* The deci- 
sion was, that " the exigencies of the service were 
such that the application could not be granted." 
The Eegiment was retained in the service ; its officers 
were allowed to keep their rank as officers and as 
gentlemen ; yet they bore the disgrace of a sentence 
which, if just, would, by military laws, have brought 
the penalty of death ! Still may be found in the 
archives at Washington, the damning sentence: "The 
commission calls attention to the disgraceful behavior 
of the 126th New York Regiment of Infantry ;" and 
newspapers, cyclopedias and biographical dictionaries 
have repeated the charge from that time to this. A 
band of young volunteers, patriotic, high-minded, 
rushing at the call of the President to the defense 
of principles which they esteemed vital, and a flag 
which they deemed sacred, were, at the very outset 
of their career, made victims instead of heroes ; and 
incurred a stigma which their young blood, bravely 
shed on many battle-fields, has not yet washed away 
Unable to get proper redress for the irreparable 
wrong they have received, they deem it due to the 
memory of its sixteen officers and hundreds of 
enlisted men who were subsequently killed in action, 

* Who had as much to do with it as the Emperor of China. The Regi- 
ment was in the service of the United States, not of the State of New York. 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 47 

as well as to the maimed and scarred survivors of 
the regiment, that a plain, nnvarnished story of the 
whole affair at Maryland Heights and Harper's Ferry, 
should, even at this late day, he published. Such 
a narrative if ever so well substantiated, may not 
change public sentiment. But no soldier falls with- 
out leaving behind him many to whom his reputa- 
tion is as dear as to himself. If, by a candid and 
impartial statement of facts, gathered from diaries 
kept and letters written at the time by officers and 
privates, and from various other sources,* we can 
clear that reputation and throw the blame where it 
justly belongs, those friends surely will not think 
' ' we have labored in vain or spent our strength for 
nought." We think that the very testimony (a copy 
of which now lies before us) of the witnesses who 
slandered the 126th before the examiners, proves 
conclusively that they left their own commands on 
one pretext or another, at the most critical period 
of the action on Maryland Heights. Generally this 
pretext was that they were seeking in the rear for 
those ' ' cowardly, " " skulking, " " scoundrels, " " the 
126th ;" and endeavoring, unsuccessfully, to drive 
them back into action at the point of the bayonet, 
or by threats with loaded revolvers. (The only trou- 
ble was, they sought for the Regiment in the wrong- 
place.) Had these valiant detectives been where offi- 

* We have before us ten or twelve independent narratives of the Harper's 
Ferry disaster, in manuscript, written without collusion, by line officers and 
enlisted men of the 126th, differing in details, but agreeing in substantial 
particulars. 



48 The Adventures of 

cers are generally expected to be when a battle is 
raging, they would have seen nine Companies of the 
126th fighting in their proper places on the heights, 
and one Company doing picket duty on the right 
of the ridge. No doubt there were some skulkers ; 
there always are in every fight ; even some of the 
line officers may have been among them ; and the 
tall figures 126 in the front of their caps made them 
particularly conspicuous ; but that there was any 
general "skedaddling," as one of the officer wit- 
nesses elegantly terms it, we can find no shadow of 
proof, but much evidence to the contrary. One of 
the witnesses whose evidence seems to have had 
most influence with the commission, because it was 
artfully framed so as to seem to be given with great 
reluctance, and who received from that commission 
a special commendation as having ' ' behaved with 
great gallantry," we mean acting Adjutant B arras, 
was, three months afterward, dismissed from the 
United States service for disobedience of orders and 
other conduct unworthy of an officer and a gentle- 
man. Of the worth of his testimony the reader must 
judge for himself. 

But we will not anticipate by arguing the case here. 
Our business now is to condense, from several of the 
narratives we have mentioned (note, page 10), an 
account of events as they took place, as clearly and 
concisely as we may 

The 126th Regiment New York Volunteers on arriv- 
ing at Harper's Ferry, whither they were ordered by 
General Wool, found it occupied by the 111th New 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 49 

York Volunteers, the 39th New York Volunteers,' the 
32d Ohio Volunteers, the 12th New York State "Mili- 
tia, the ,-lst Rhode Island Battery, and a portion of 
the 5th New York Heavy Artillery, all commanded by 
Colonel Dixon H. Miles.* The Regiment encamped 
on the plateau which occupies middle ground between 
Harper's Ferry and Bolivar Heights, and on which 
stands the village of Bolivar, or, as it might be called, 
upper Harper's Ferry The Regiment being com- 
posed of raw recruits, immediately entered the school 
of the soldier, drilling, guard duty, picket duty, and 
the manual of arms, except loading and firing. These 
duties, arduous in themselves to the inexperienced, 
were rendered doubly exhausting by the climate, which 
was hot and debilitating in the daytime, and cool 
almost to frostiness at night. Food, different from what 
they had been accustomed to, and prepared by inex- 
perienced cooks, was neither very palatable nor health- 
ful ; and sleeping on the chill ground, with scanty 
covering, was not very refreshing. Discomforts seem, 
however, to have been borne with fortitude, and even 
among those who did not escape consequent sickness, 
form the theme of jesting comment in their diaries 
and letters. 

On the 1st of September orders were given for the 
establishment of a post hospital in three large govern- 
ment buildings above the village of Harper's Ferry, 
under the charge of Surgeon Wm. Vosbiugii, of the 

* This was the siimc Colonel Miles who, at the first battle of Bull Run, 
gave such conflicting orders to the officers, that great entanglement and 
confusion ensued, and they decided not to obey him. 



50 The Advextures of 

111th New York, with 1st Assistant-Surgeon C. S. 
Hoyt, of the 126th New York, as assistant. Colonel 
Miles ordered all the sick from the varions regi- 
mental hospitals to this general hospital, and it soon 
numbered over three hundred patients. On the 3d 
and 4th the forces at Harper's Ferry were augmented 
by those from Winchester, under General White, 
driven thence by the advancing enemy, and ordered 
by Pope to this place. ' Those were stirring days. 
Long lines of infantry, cavalry, artillery and their 
baggage filed in over Bolivar Heights, having fired 
the quartermaster's stores and magazines before leav- 
ing Winchester.* The next day their commander, 
General White, was ordered to the defense of Mar- 
tinsburg, a town a few miles distant, on the Baltimore 
and Ohio railroad. On the 5th, the troops, including 
those from Winchester, were brigaded. The 126th 
were ordered to break up at Camp Prouty, and 
remove their camp to the low, sharp ridge at the 
rear of the plateau, called Bolivar Heights. The 60th 
Ohio, 9th Vermont and 126th New York, with the 
battery of Captain Potts, constituted the 2d Brigade, 
Colonel Trimble commanding. All communication 
with other places by railroad and telegraph, was cut 
off by the advancing enemy Sunday, the 7th, the men 
were employed in clearing the timber from the west 

bank of the Potomac. One of our officers describes 

I" 

* The troops from Winchester consisted of the 115th New York Volun- 
teers, 9th ^M-nia, 60th Ohio, S&fc-JHtnois, and some other Regiments. 
The 126th shared with the tired and weary guests their own rations of 
bacon and coffee ; hospitality that was afterward opportunely repaid by 
some of the Regiments. 



One Thousand Boys in Blue 51 

the "slaughter of these noble chestnut trees, the pride 
of Virginians, as cruel," but it was necessary in order 
to clear a range for artillery and prevent a flank 
movement. On the 8th more trees were felled, and a 
battery was placed on the road to Winchester. On 
Monday, the 9th, occurred the first death in the Regi- 
ment. This was of Henry E. Simons, of Company K, 
(Chas. M. Wheeler, Captain.) Many of the diaries 
and letters written at this time mention this first death 
in the Regiment, and all speak of the kindness and care 
he received in the hospital. Neither did he and others 
in the hospital want for woman's care. Mrs. Depew, 
whose husband was in Captain Coleman's Company, 
and a few Union ladies of Harper's Ferry, are parti- 
cularly mentioned by Surgeon Hoyt as showing every 
kindness to the sick and wounded. Colonel Miles' 
head-quarters were at Harper's Ferry, and a battery 
was posted near the hospital. Two Brigades were 
posted on Bolivar Heights, with a battery at each 
extremity On Thursday, the 11th, the approach of 
" Stonewall Jackson " obliged General White to 
evacuate Martinsburg, and with his Brigade he 
returned to Harper's Ferry, waiving, however, his 
right to take command there in favor of Colonel 
Miles. 

If we have made our description of Harper's Ferry 
and its surroundings intelligible, it must be quite evi- 
dent that no line of defense at the ferry, or on the 
plateau of Bolivar, or on Bolivar Heights, could be 
held for any length of time against an enemy who 
should have possession of Maryland Heights. As the 



52 The Adventures of 

rebel general, McLaws, says in his report: "So long 
as Maryland Heights was occnpied by the enemy, 
Harper's Ferry could never be occupied by us. If 
we gained possession of the heights, the town was no 
longer tenable to them." That Miles was not igno- 
rant of this fact, is evident ; for he had a part in the 
defense of Harper's Perry the May preceding, having 
command of "the Railroad Brigade" there. General 
Saxton, in his report of that affair, says: "Lieutenant 
Daistiels, with his naval battery of Dahlgren guns, on 
Maryland Heights, 2,000 feet above the level of the 
sea, did splendid service throughout the entire siege." 
"The great elevation of this battery enabled us to 
shower shells directly over the heads of our own forces 
(at Bolivar) into the faces of the foe advancing over 
Bolivar Heights." All this must have been known to 
Colonel Miles. But he was not left to his own dis- 
cretion in the matter. As early as the 15th of August 
he received peremptory orders from General Wool 
to fortify Maryland Heights. McClellan" himself, 
although deeming our possession of Harper's Ferry of 
small importance after the enemy was actually in 
Maryland, and believing that Miles' force ought to 
have been withdrawn from there and added to his 
own army, still when overruled on this point, sent 
word to Miles to defend Maryland Heights if it with- 
drew every man from Harper' s Ferry to accomplish it. 
And 7ww were these important heights defended 1 In 
some places the ridge was so sharp and the slopes on 
each side so precipitous, that what little artificial for- 
tification was needed would have been easv At such 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 



53 



points, cannon, suitably posted, could have been 
easily defended, and with the trees and under-growth 
cleared, might have swept the whole vicinity On the 
11th of September the condition of the heights was as 
follows. We have said that the Potomac river was 
crossed at Harper's Ferry by a railroad bridge, the 
northern end of which was directly under Maryland 
Heights. From this point a difficult road had been 




HARPER'S FERRY. 



carried up around the western slope of the mountain 
to its top, and thence down the eastern side to Sandy 
Hook. Half way up the mountain, on this road, was 
the battery we have spoken of (for it seems to have 
been the very battery used there the May previous) 
and some light field pieces, all commanded b}' Captain 
McGuATii. On the mountain's ridge ran a road, or 
rather bridle-path, crossing the Sandy Hook road at 



54 The Adventures of One Thousand Boys in Blue. 

its highest point. Following this path northerly three- 
fourths of a mile from the point of its intersection with 
the road, up a steep slope to the summit of the 
heights, you reached a small log hut called the look- 
out ; thence going on northerly a quarter of a mile 
further, you come to a rude breastwork of logs, 
thrown across the ridge and a few rods down the 
western side. The east side was so precipitous as to 
need no defense. In front of these breastworks, for 
fifteen rods perphaps, the trees had been cut down 
and left on the ground, forming a slashing or rude 
abattis"; but down the slopes west of the breastworks, 
the woods were left standing, and a thick under- 
growth of laurel. Thirty rods south of the breast- 
works, a bridle-path wound diagonally down toward 
Harper's Ferry for some distance, and reached an old 
house and clear spring ; thence it led along the moun- 
tain side a fourth of a mile to McGeath's Battery 
This road, or path, was of use afterward, as we shall 
see. 



Chapter Y 



,OLONEL THOMAS H. FORD, with the 32d 
Regiment Ohio Volunteers and two companies of 
% the 39th New York had been placed by Colonel 
Miles in command of the heights. A few Maryland 
troops who had been doing duty in the eastern part 
of the State, [had been compelled by the enemy to 
betake themselves to the heights, and had joined 
Colonel Ford's command. Incredible as it may seem, 
these were the only preparations for the defense of 
Maryland Heights, the key of Harper's Ferry, up to 
the 12th of September. Indeed, nothing astonishes us 
more, in this remarkable piece of history, than the 
supineness and inactivity of the commander of the 
post. With his railroad and telegraphic communica- 
tions all cut off by the enemy, he seems to have made 
no attempt, by spies or couriers or cavalry reconnois- 
sances, to learn what was going on in his vicinity 

But if the garrison was almost entirely ignorant of 
the movement of friends and foes, neither friends nor 
foes were idle ; especially was there no inactivity in 
Lee. On leaving Frederick, and setting out for the 
Shenandoah Valley, he found that our occupation of 
Harper's Ferry would seriously obstruct his plans. 
Therefore he made immediate dispositions to capture 



56 The Adventures of 

that post. To this end, he ordered "Stonewall" 
Jackson to proceed by way of Sharpsburg, and cross- 
ing the Potomac above Harper's Ferry, to invest it in 
the rear ; Walker was to cross below the ferry and 
take possession of Loudon Heights ; while McLaws 
was to proceed directly and capture Maryland 
Heights.* The advance was begun on the 10th, and 
the commanders were to be at their assigned positions 
on the 12th. The route of McLaws lay through Plea- 
sant Valley, which, as we have said, is bounded by the 
South Mountain on the east ; and only separated from 
Harper's Ferry by Maryland Heights. Both ranges of 
mountains break off suddenly at the Potomac on the 
south. McLaws approached Pleasant Valley by a 
road through a gap in the South Mountain, passing 
Buckettsville, three or four miles south of Crampton's 
gap. He could now reach Harper's Ferry by keeping 
the road between Maryland Heights and the river, or 
by crossing the heights. Knowing the importance of 
gaining these elevations, he did not hesitate to attempt 
to force their passage, although assured by the 
inhabitants in the neighborhood that they were 
guarded by long lines of batteries on their summits. 
Kershaw, with his own Brigade of infantry, and 
Barksdale with his, were ordered to ascend 
the mountain at Solomon's gap, two or three 
miles north of the Potomac, and thence, by the road 
on the ridge, to advance southward and carry the 
heights. General Wright's Brigade, of General 
Anderson's Division, was to plant two pieces of artil- 

* See Lee's general order, page 40. 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 57 

lery near the end of the South Mountain, thus com- 
manding the railroad, turnpike and canal at Wever- 
ton, and preventing all escape of the Harper's Ferry 
garrison in that direction. Another Brigade protected 
the rear of Keeshaw General Cobb was to cross 
Pleasant Valley, and support Kekshaw if necessary 
On the 11th of September, Fokd, who commanded on 
Maryland Heights, became aware of the approach of 
McLaws and Baeksdale, by the driving in of our 
pickets from Sandy Hook, and sent to Miles for rein- 
forcements. At about ten o'clock that evening, orders 
were issued to the 126th New York to march at sun- 
rise the next day for Maryland Heights, with one 
day's rations and eighty rounds of cartridges per man. 
The field officers of the 126th Regiment, at this time, 
were E. Sheeeill, Colonel of the Regiment, Major 
Baied, and acting Adjutant Baeras. Lieutenant-Colo- 
nel Bull was detained (arranging his affairs) and did 
not reach the Regiment until after its surrender. At 
sunrise the Regiment marched to Bolivar, was halted, 
and then marched back to camp on Bolivar Heights, 
but ordered to be in readiness to move. At three in 
the afternoon orders were given to march, and the 
Regiment, conducted by Major Hewitt (:$2d Ohio 
Volunteers), marched rapidly through Harper's Feny, 
across the pontoon bridge, up the Sandy Hook road, 
past McGeath's Battery till they reached the bridle- 
path along the ridge. It was an excessively hot day ; 
the way was very steep and difficult ; many strong men 
fell, victims of sunstroke or faintness. To guard the 
approach from Pleasant Valley by the Sandy Hook 



58 The Adventures of 

road, the two right Companies of the Regiment (A and 
F) were left at this point, and about half way up the 
slope to the "lookout" the next three Companies (D, 
I and C), under command of Captain P D. Phillips, 
of Company D, were stationed ; the left Companies 
under the special command of Colonel Sherrill, along 
the ridge from the lookout to the breastworks and 
beyond them. The left Companies immediately became 
engaged with the enemy, who had gained the ridge 
by way of Solomon's gap, some distance north of the 
breastworks, and the skirmishing was so sharp that 
Companies C and I were moved up to the support of 
the left. Night put an end to the fighting ; but to 
prevent a flank movement by the enemy, Company K 
was placed thirty rods down the slope on the left, the 
men lying on their arms all night. 

In the morning, at daylight, Kershaw's and Barks- 
dale' s BrigadeSj who had ascended the mountain in the 
afternoon of the 12th, advanced in force. Our troops 
consisted of some Maryland Companies, a part of the 
32d Ohio, seven Companies of the 126th, and, perhaps, 
some of the Garibaldi Guards, as the 39th New York 
were called. Sharp skirmishing continued for an hour 
or more, when the enemy was reinforced so as greatly 
to outnumber us. The Maryland troops gave way, 
but the detachments of the 32d Ohio and 126th New 
York stood firm and contested the ground stubbornly, 
until their left being flanked, and they, pressed upon 
by superior numbers, were ordered to fall back 
behind the abattis and breastworks. This they did 
rapidly, but in good order, facing about and firing as 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 59 

they went, and finally climbing over the slashing of 
timber, they formed behind the breastworks. General 
McLaws (rebel) calls it "a very sharp and spirited 
engagement, through dense woods, over a very broken 
surface." Companies C and F were placed near the 
center, at the breastworks. Company D was ordered 
np from the slope, on the south of the lookout, to 
the left of C and F. Company A still guarded the 
Sandy Hook road. The right of Company Gf was 
deployed between the breastworks and the lookout, 
its left at the breastworks on the right. Half of Com- 
pany H, under Lieutenant Redfield, was deployed 
down the mountain, some forty rods, to the left of the 
breastworks, rather too far to be available in prevent- 
ing a flank movement, while its right, with Companies 
K, E and B, were posted at the breastworks, as well 
as a detachment of the 32d Ohio. There were quite 
enough men at these works to fight to advantage, 
and the other forces on the heights should have been 
held in reserve to relieve these, or else have been 
posted on the slope west of the breastworks to pre- 
vent a flank movement. But Lieutenant-Colonel Dow- 
ney, with a small detachment of the 3d Maryland and 
of the 1st Maryland Cavalry, and Major Hildebrajntd, 
with a detachment of the 39th New York (Garibaldi 
Guards), ranged their commands in the rear of the 
left of the 126th ; not at all a post of danger for them- 
selves or threatening to the enemy, but great])' endan- 
gering our own troops in front of tliem, over whose 
heads they fired, oftentimes without sighting their 
pieces. After they had blown off the caps and singed 



60 The Advekiures of 

the hair of some of the 126th, this "fire in the rear" 
was checked by some of the officers in front, who 
faced abont and threatened to fire on the offenders if 
they did not cease. About seven o'clock, a. m., the 
enemy moved up and opened fire from beyond the 
abattis. For some time the fire was very heavy on 
both sides, and the enemy still kept beyond the abat- 
tis, but at length a movement to the left was observed 
among them, and their fire slackened a little. Colonel 
Shereill, who, from his exposed post on the breast- 
works, observed this, instantly ordered Captain Phil- 
lips, who acted for the time as Major, to take two 
Companies and deploy them to the left and rear, and 
meet the enemy's flanking party- Captain Phillips 
took his own Company, D, and Captain Scott's, 
C, from the breastwork, on the double-quick, and 
deployed them rapidly in a diagonal line down 
the mountain side just in time to meet a strong 
party of the enemy working their way through 
the woods and tangled vines.* Fighting imme- 

* Major Hildbbrand testified before the commission that, after the 
second fire, he saw great " confusion of the new Regiments, mostly the 
126th ; they ran down in a very great haste." He probably saw the move- 
ment we have just described, and mistook it for flight. 

By the way, if our forces "ran at the second fire" on Maryland Heights, 
is it not strange that the rebel accounts never allude to it ? In McLaws' 
Report, which is said by our officers to be very truthful and candid, he says : 
" The troops (rebel) who were engaged on Maryland Heights are entitled to 
special commendation, as they were laboriously employed for (parts of) 
two days and one night along the summit of the ridge, constantly working 
their way under fire during the day, and at night resting in position, &c." 
Now, as the 126th New York and the 32d Ohio were the only full Regi- 
ments on the heights, and as the enemy had two Brigades there under con- 
stant fire, is it not evident that the " running away " of the 126th is a fabri- 
cation ? 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 61 

diately commenced, but Companies C and D suc- 
ceeded in holding their position and completely 
foiling the enemy in their effort to turn the left 
flank. In this fight on the left, Captain Scott, of 
Company C, received a severe wound in the leg, and 
two men of Companies D and C were mortally and 
five seriously wounded. The fire which had slackened 
at the breastworks, raged again with great fury 
Colonel Sherrill, standing on the logs, encouraged 
his men and directed their fire, regardless of the 
expostulations of his officers. He was just indignantly 
replying to their suggestions of his personal danger, 
when a shot struck him in the face, tearing through 
both cheeks, knocking out several teeth and wound- 
ing the tongue so as to render him speechless. He 
was borne to the rear, but his Regiment only fought 
more desperately, as if to avenge his loss, and not a 
thought of retreat entered their minds. Yet, of the 
officers, Colonel Ford was not to be found, and his 
substitute, Major Hewitt, who, contrary to military 
rule, had been placed in command of superior officers, 
did not think it consistent with personal safety to 
approach the breastworks. The soldiers, however, 
inspirited by success, needed no command to main- 
tain their ground ; they felt that their position 
was strong ; the enemy had only once attempted 
to advance beyond the abattis, and then had been 
repulsed ; the men, althoiigh they had been fight- 
ing since daylight, were still vigorous and gaining 
every moment in steadiness and self-possession, when 
a Lieutenant, who gave himself out as acting Aid to 



62 The Adventures of 

Colonel Ford, brought a verbal order to Phillips to 
withdraw the troops in good order from the breast- 
works. Phillips declined to give the order. It was 
not in writing, he did not' know the bearer, and it 
seemed utterly unreasonable. The Lieutenant again 
gave the order to withdraw the men to the rear of the 
lookout, as McGrath' s Battery was about to shell the 
woods where they were. Captain Phillips, being in 
command of the left, referred the order \o Major 
Baird, whom he supposed to be on the right. The 
bearer in the meantime carried the order to the other 
troops, who immediately retired from their position, so 
that the 126th found themselves alone. They then 
reluctantly fell back to the rear of the lookout. Lieu- 
tenant Lincoln says: "The rebels could be seen over 
(beyond) the abattis and breastworks in force ; but as 
we were holding them in check at all points, it was a 
mystery to all why we should be ordered to fall back, 
which we did not do till the third order came." * As 
to withdrawing in good order, that is, in military order, 
the nature of the ground and the narrowness of the 
way rendered it impossible, especially as the wounded 
had to be carried in blankets by men walking in 
single file. But there was no "stampede" as a wit- 
ness called it, and no arms were thrown away. Cap- 
tain Wheeler, one of the last on the ground, says he 
saw but one fire arm that had been left, and on look- 
ing at that, he found the lock broken, f 

* Letter of Lieutenant Lincoln. 

\ The Companies who were fighting down the hill on the left did not get 
the order to retire, and knew nothing of what had happened until, hearing 
the rebel commander giving orders at the breastworks, Lieutenant Rich- 



Oxe Thousand Boys in Blue. 63 

In the meantime a stand had been made south of 
the Lookout, by most of the Companies of the 126th 
jSTew York, the 32d Ohio and parts of other Regi- 
ments, they being formed across the ridge and down 
the left side. A slight skirmish took place with 
little result. Colonel Sammons now arrived from 
Harper's Ferry with his own Regiment as a rein- 
forcement. They came up past McGeatii's battery 
to the old house and spring, and were formed on 
the hill side connecting with the left on the hill. 
McGrath's battery began throwing shell among the 
enemy at the breastworks. They, for some reason, 
did not pursue our troops. The probability is, that 
seeing our men withdrawn without apparent cause 
from their comparatively strong position at the breast- 
works, and having heard that batteries were con- 

ardson, of Company D, went up to see what was going on, and found the 
works abandoned by our troops and in rebel hands. Seeing the enemy at 
the works, and two or three of the 126th helping a wounded comrade 
toward the lookout ; he stepped from the path on the ridge back into the 
bushes, and a few shots were fired after him. He returned to his skirmishers, 
assembled them and hearing a cheer from the enemy as they advanced 
toward the lookout, took them by the diagonal road leading clown to the 
old house and spring. They were joined by Lieutenant Redfield, of 
Company H, who, having been stationed down on the left, had not heard 
the order to retreat, and who had ascertained the state of affairs by going 
up toward the breastworks and finding them in the possession of the enemy. 
Not being able to rejoin their Regiment directly, these Lieutenants with 
their detachments, made their way to McGrath's battery, where they dis- 
covered many superior officers whom they had missed on the field. Here 
they found Colonels Miles and Ford, with Lieutenant-Colonel Downey 
of the 8d Maryland, Major Hugo Hildkbrand of the 39th New York, and 
his valiant companion, acting Adjutant Barras, of the 12(ith, who had been 
missing from his Regiment ever since the skirmish in the morning, and who 
excused ins absence from his post to Colonels Milks and Ford, by assert- 
ing that his Regiment had all run away and that lie had been vainly 
attempting to rally them ! 



64 The Adventures of 

cealed in the woods on the mountain, they did not 
think it prudent to do so. Another reason was, that 
Lee, who had heard of Franklin's advance toward 
South Mountain, had ordered McLaws to send a 
large force to defend Crampton's pass. 

The 126th being now under command of its line 
officers only, Colonel Sheprill being wounded, their 
Major being absent, and their Adjutant (Barras) 
being invisible to the naked eye, held a consulta- 
tion as to who should lead them, and direct what 
should be done ; and by common consent, acting 
Major Phillips took command of the Regiment and 
formed them at the rear of the lookout ; but at three 
o'clock, p. m., a peremptory order came to march 
back to their camping ground on Bolivar Heights.* 
Most of the guns in McGtRath's battery were spiked 
and tumbled down the heights, one poor soldier 
being horribly mangled in the operation ; and thus 
this important position on which depended the 
safety of 11, COO men and a vast amount of mili- 
tary stores and provisions, was abandoned to the 
enemy. 

As we stated (note, page 47), we have before us 
a large number of independent accounts of the fight- 
ing on Maryland Heights, written by line officers 
and enlisted men of the Regiment, without concert, 
and yet so agreeing in essential particulars as to 
prove their substantial truth. To make this evident, 

* Lieutenant Lincoln says : " Had an order been given to surrender to 
the enemy, we should not have been more surprised ; for in abandoning that 
position, we saw plainly that everything was lost." 



Oxe T ho us a xn Boys ix Blue. (35 

we will here give brief extracts from several of them. 
Says Captain Winiteld Scott of Company C, con- 
cerning the morning fight 100 rods north of the 
breastworks: "After the skirmishers, consisting of 
detachments of the 32d Ohio and 1st Maryland, and 
Company K of the 126th were driven in (by Ker- 
shaw's Brigade, very early in the morning), several 
Companies of the 126th were formed in line of bat- 
tle. I looked to the front, and within thirty rods 
of us the woods were filled with rebels, coming 
toward us and yelling like Indians. I passed up and 
down the line of my own command, and never since 
have seen men cooler, or exhibiting better spirit. 
When ordered to fall back behind the breastworks, it 
was done steadily, the men loading and then facing 
about and firing, * * "'• The fire was kept up at 
the breastworks for some time with great fury " 
After describing his being sent to the left to repel the 
enemy's flank movement, and his wound which obliged 
him to leave the field, he says: "As I left I saw 
several Companies of the 126th fighting without the 
least sign of confusion, and with great spirit. Colonel 
Sheriull passed me, wounded in the 11101101," &<■ 
Says Sergeant Feuouson of Company F: "My expe- 
rience since (of fighting) has convinced me that on said 
occasion, both officers and men fought bravely ; and 
on receiving the order to abandon the works, they 
very reluctantly gave up the position and slowly 
retired." He concludes: "We reached our old 
camp about five p. m. the same day, full}' convinced 



66 The Adventures of 

that we were bagged and about to be surrendered by 
a traitorous commander."* 

Says another enlisted man of Company F, after an 
account of the posting of the men, substantially like 
the one in our description: "The conduct of Col- 
onel Sherrill was beyond all praise. The attack 
was mainly on our left front, where we were in 
files of five or six, and firing rapidly Every can- 
did man knows that the 126th did most of the fight- 
ing on Maryland Heights. " (This is in a letter 
written from Annapolis, about' a week after the 
fight.) "We returned to our old position feeling 
disheartened that we were compelled to yield so 
strong a position," &c. Captain Wheeler, of Com- 
pany K, says of the men at the breastworks: "They 
were very cool, indeed, as a rule ; dropping behind 
the breastworks to load, and then rising and firing 
coolly over the breastworks." Captain Phillips, of 
Company D, writes :f " We occupied Maryland 
Heights about six o'clock, the evening of the 12th 
of September. I was appointed acting Major of the 

* We said to a brave young private of the 126th, who was in the war 
until he received a dreadful wound at the battle of the Wilderness, and 
whom we shall hear more of by and by : " What did you men think when 
you were ordered to leave the breastworks ?" " Why," said he, " we thought 
we hadn't ought to leave ; we thought we were sold." Conversing with 
another, Corporal Peck, of Company D, he said: "I was on picket that 
morning and did not go up on the heights till afternoon, when being relieved, 
some of us begged to go up and have a hand in the fight. We never had 
been in one and thought we would like it. As we were going up we met 
our troops coming down, slowly and looking pretty sober. We asked them 
what they were coming down for? They said they were sure they didn't 
know. They were coming because they were ordered to." 

f We would here state that in writing our previous account, we did not 
make use of Captain P 's letter ; therefore his statement corroborates that. 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 67 

Regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel Bull being absent, and 
Major Baikd acting Lieutenant-Colonel. * * * In 
the morning, as soon as it was light, the rebels opened 
a heavy skirmish fire on Colonel Sherrill, a mile or 
more north of me." * * * Captain P., after giving 
an account of joining Colonel S.'s forces with Com- 
pany D, goes on : Our forces ' ' were posted behind a 
rude breastwork of logs, the right resting on the 
rocky, precipitous slope of the east side of the moun- 
tain. At the left of the breastwork was a narrow 

* 

wagon road. The sides of the road, and a large por- 
tion of the top of the mountain, are thickly grown up 
to laurel bushes. In front of the breastworks was a 
slashing several rods in width. Our position was a 
good one. We could not be flanked on the right. 
To flank us on the left, the only open space was the 
wagon road, and the laurel bushes would impede 
their progress, giving us greatly the advantage. To 
have charged us in front would have been a hazardous 
undertaking for the rebels, the ground being covered 
with slashed timber. And when I think of it, I 
believe if our Regiment could have been relieved, as 
in doing guard duty, we could have held that posi- 
tion any length of time against infantry 

"On arriving at the breastworks, Colonel Sherrill 
put me in command of the left wing, with orders to 
protect the left flank if it took every man from the 
works to do it. We had been fighting for an hour or 
two, when the enemy undertook to turn onr left. I 
took Companies D and C and put them in position 
outside (at the left) of the breastworks, and drove 



68 The Adventures of 

back the enemy after a spirited engagement. In 
this affair several men of Companies D and C were 
wounded ; Captain Scott, severely. I reported to 
Colonel Sheeeill what had been done, and requested 
that the men might remain where I had placed them, 
as they could do as good execution where they were 
as if they were behind the works. There were as 
many men behind the works as could act to advan- 
tage. There had joined us two Companies of the 39th 
New York Volunteers, one Company 32d Ohio Volun- 
teers, and one dismounted Maryland cavalry. The 
Colonel said: 'Let them remain where they are.' * * 
We held the breastworks for some time after the Colo- 
nel was wounded, the men firing rapidly, behaving 
finely, and undoubtedly doing good execution. In the 
afternoon, * * * a 2d Lieutenant, who told me he 
was acting aid for Colonel Foed, ordered me to with- 
draw my Kegiment in good order, and place them on 
the first level in the woods beyond the lookout, as 
McG-eatii's Battery was going to shell the rebels. I 
told the Lieutenant I could not give the order ; I was 
not in command of the Regiment, and furthermore that 
I did not know him. (It was a verbal order.) The 
commanding officer could not be found, and the shells 
from McG-eath's Battery coming among us, I then 
gave the order, * * * urged hard to do it by the 
Aid ; and the shells from our Battery convincing me of 
its genuineness. * * * We had a narrow, rocky 
path ; were obliged to go in single file and carry our 
wounded. Our line was so extended it was impossible 
for one man to command the whole. I ordered the 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 69 

Captains to take command of their Companies, and 
get back the best way they could. The enemy's fire 
was severe on us as soon as we left the works. I got 
to the position ordered with about 300 men. Compa- 
nies A, K, and part of H, were not with us at the 
breastworks, they were guarding other approaches to 
the mountain. Then we had a large detail on picket 
on the Winchester road, and this with our sick and 
wounded, and camp guard, lessened our numbers. 
* * * rpj^ ffi cers that had got separated from 
us with their commands, i. e., those who had been 
engaged in repelling the flank movement, made a 
detour to the left, under cover of the woods, and could 
only get to us by going around and coming up by the 
road in our rear, which they did, and joined us a 
short time before we vacated the heights." * * * 
"After a short time, the 32d Ohio (I think), com- 
manded by their Lieutenant- Colon el, marched past us 
and halted ; and said we were to support him. We 
formed on his right. Within a few moments, some 
one in the rear commanded, 'Halt Battalion.' The 
Lieutenant-Colonel, Captain Shimer, myself and some 
other officers went back to see what was wanted. We 
found Lieutenant Bareas, with thirty or forty men, 
and a Major with a long gray beard. The Colonel 
inquired if he halted the Regiment. He said he did. 
That he had orders from Colonel Ford to form the 126th 
there where he was, to support the 32d Ohio. While 
there, fighting commenced with our command and the 
enemy We hastened back to our men. But Barras 
and the Major (Hewitt), both being mounted, jumped 



70 The Adventures of 

from their horses, made to the rear (quick time), 'to 
look after stragglers /' Some of their men went with 
them ; some brave boys remained, disgusted with the 
cowardly demonstrations of Barras, one of their Com- 
pany officers, f * * * The position the enemy then 
held was on the hill above us. His strength we knew 
not, but had no doubt of his superior numbers. 
The Lieutenant-Colonel called a few of us together. 
We held a council, and concluded to move to a good 
position and wait for reinforcements. We did so. No 
reinforcements came, but an order came to vacate 
Maryland Heights. And the 126th was the last to 
leave it." 2d Lieutenant Munson, Company F, says: 
"Some of the enemy told us they thought we were 
regulars, we fired so low.f 

We have also full accounts of the transactions on 
Maryland Heights, by Lieutenant Richardson, Com- 
pany D ; but we have made such free use of them in 
our own narrative that it would be superfluous to 
transcribe them here. We will only add to these 
accounts a solemn declaration, drawn up on the 11th 
of November, 1862, by the Captains of the Companies 

f One young fellow of Company A, Sergeant Wilson, seeing this dis- 
graceful conduct, and that twenty or thirty of his comrades had run with 
Barras, stepped out from the ranks and harangued the men ; told them 
hs was going to fight under Captain Phillips and called on them to do so. 
Several men immediately joined him and ranged themselves in Captain 
Phillips' Company. 

X Extract from Captain Wheeler's diary, dated at Union Mills, Decem- 
ber 25 : " Saw Captain Paddleford and Major Fitzgerald to-day. They 
had just come from Harper's Ferry, where they were fortifying and built 
earthworks just where our breastworks were ; they speak highly of our 
fighting there, as shown by the marks of the shots and the number of the 
dead." 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 71 

in the 126th, and signed with his own hand, "by every 
line officer of the Regiment who was present on Mary- 
land Heights on the memorable 13th of September. It 
was drawn out by articles in various newspapers, in 
which the 126th was made to bear the disgrace of the 
surrender of the heights and the consequent disaster at 
Harper's Ferry; and especially by a newspaper report 
that they, in their absence, had been tried and con- 
demned by a military commission. This declaration 
was addressed to and printed in the leading news- 
papers of the northern States ; but the manliness of 
its tone and its evident truthfulness entitle it to a 
place here. 

Camp Douglas, Chicago, III., 
November 11, 1862. 
Editors of 

In several communications respecting the surrender of Harper's 
Ferry, the 126th Regiment New York Volunteers have been 
stigmatized as having acted in a shameful manner. That state- 
ment has now gained an importance, not hitherto belonging to it, 
from the report of the Harper's Ferry Commission, which declares, 
if newspaper accounts are to be credited, that the Regiment broke 
and disgracefully fled. 

A regard for our own reputation, and the reputation of the 
men we command, demands that we shall no longer be silent 
under imputations equally injurious and unfounded. 

We, therefore, all the line officers of the 126th Regiment of 
New York Volunteers now living who were present at the 
engagement on Maryland Heights, do declare, upon our honor 
as gentlemen and soldiers, that the following statements are 
true : 

1st. That, in the first assault, early in the morning, eight Com- 
panies of the 126th New York, with a part of the Ohio, were 
drawn up in the advance in line of battle on Maryland Heights, 
and, though in a position strengthened by no defenses either of 



72 The Adventures of 

nature or of art, and exposed to the attack of a vastly superior 
force, did not retreat until an order to that effect was given. 
They then retired to the breastworks. 

2d. That the whole Regiment was in the engagement at the 
breastworks excepting one Company, that no Company aban- 
doned those defenses before the entire Regiment did, excepting 
three Companies ordered to the left to repel a flank attack. This 
they did effectually. 

3d. That, after the wounding of Colonel Shekrill, no field or 
staff officer of our Regiment was present to our knowledge; that 
orders of the most contradictory character constantly followed 
one another; and that after the fall of our Colonel no field 
officers of any Regiment were seen by any one of us until we 
had fallen back from the breastworks at least three-quarters of a 
mile. 

4th. That an order, unnecessary even if not criminal, to aban- 
don the breastworks was given by a member of Colonel Fokd's 
staff to Captain Phillips, who was appointed by our Colonel to 
the command of our left wing ; that the breastworks could have 
been held, and, in our opinion, should have been held, for a long 
time, if not altogether, by the force there present, and that the 
order to abandon them was based upon the ground* that the 
woods were to be shelled by our guns. 

5th. That this order Captain Phillips refused to communicate 
to the men until the abandonment of the position by the other 
Regiments rendered it no longer tenable. 

Individuals may have fled previously, but neither the Regi- 
ment, nor any Company of it, left the breastworks until the 32d 
Ohio and the Garibaldi Guards (39th New York) had, in obe- 
dience to orders, retired from those defenses. 

6th. That the Regiment then retreated in as good order as any 
other on the ground, was then drawn up in line of battle, and in 
that position remained unmolested until about three o'clock, when 
it received the command to leave the heights. 

7th. That in the engagement on Maryland Heights the 126th 
New York lost more men in killed and wounded than all the 
other Regiments put together. 

To the truth of the above statements we are willing to bear 
witness anywhere and everywhere. 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 73 

However much the conduct of the Regiment may have been 
misrepresented by officers who ran early from the battle, and 
succeeded in first reaching the reporters, or by officers interested 
in covering their want of courage or capacity by laying to our 
charge the blame of a defense badly planned and badly main- 
tained, all we ask of our countrymen is justice, that having done 
as much and suffered more than any other Regiment at Harper's 
Ferry, we should not bear the odium of a result for which we are 
not responsible. 

Wm. A. Coleman, Captain Company B. 
R. A. Bassett, 1st Lieutenant Company B. 
Winfield Scott, Captain Company C. 
T. R. Lounsbury, 1st Lieutenant Company C. 
P. D. Phillips, Captain Company D. 
C. A. Richardson, 1st Lieutenant Company D. 
S. F. Lincoln, 2d Lieutenant Company D. 
Henry D. Kipp, Captain Company E. 
John H. Brough, 2d Lieutenant Company E. 
Isaac Shimer, Captain Company F. 
Ira Munson, 1st Lieutenant Company F. 
T. E. Munson, 2d Lieutenant Company F. 
John F. Aikins, Captain Company G. 
Sanford H. Platt, 2d Lieutenant Company G. 
* O. J. Herendeex, Captain Company II. 
Benj. F. Lee, Captain Company I. 
Gideon Skaats, 1st Lieutenant Company I. 
Chas. M. Wheeler. Captain Company K. 
II. C. Lawrence, 1st Lieutenant Company K. 

Note. — The foregoing protest was sent for publication to the following 
papers: The New York Times, Tribune and Herald, Rochester Democrat and 
American, and Rochester Union and Adccrtiser, New York; the Chicago 
Tribune, Times, Journal and Post, Illinois; the Cincinnati Commercial, and 
the papers of the counties of Ontario, Yates and Seneca. It was published 
in these papers, excepting the New York Tribune, which libelled us through 
its correspondent, but refused to give us even a hearing. 

* Captain Herendkex's name is annexed to the protest in all the printed 
statements. He, therefore, must have assented to it, and ordered his name 
for the published statement, though it is not signed to the original draft. 



74 The Adventures of 

These statements and narratives give, we think, a 
tolerably satisfactory answer to the question, who is 
responsible for the abandonment of Maryland Heights;! 
Still a few additional remarks may not be superfluous. 
First, it is evident that Colonel Miles, knowing the 
importance of holding those heights in order to check 
the advance of an enemy from the eastward, should 
have bent all his energies to strengthen and defend 
them. To allow an enemy to get possession of them, 
and then expect to hold Harper's Ferry, would argue 
not only a want of the first principles of military 
science, but absolute imbecility of intellect. He had a 
large force, many of whom had seen service, and 
many of whom were engineers, and he was well sup- 
plied with the materiel of war. Intrenching and 
other tools were not wanting. A road practicable for 
artillery up the heights need only have been the work 
of hours. Trees could have been felled, bushes cleared 
away, breastworks and slashings of trees could have 
been made wherever needed. But what was his 
course % Colonel Foed, a politician by trade, and 
with little or no military experience, and withal of a 
most cowardly disposition, was put in command of the 
heights. Even he, as he avers, was not supplied with 
intrenching tools or axes ; neither does it appear clear 
that he ever applied for any. Not till the enemy are 
actually upon him does he send for reinforcements ; 
and Miles grudgingly sends him one Regiment only 
During the action on the heights, do we find him in 
the midst of it, directing the movements of those who 
being raw recruits, must have been supposed in need 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 75 

of skillful superior officers % On the contrary, it does 
not appear that he ascended to the ridge of the moun- 
tain at all. A brave officer of the 32d Ohio, Colonel 
Ford's own Regiment, told Surgeon C. S. Hott that 
Ford never went to the top of the mountain where 
the breastworks were, either before or after the battle. 
On the west slope of the mountain, near McGrath's 
battery, he preserved that life so important to the 
defense, intrusting the control of matters on the 
heights to a venerable gentleman with a long white 
beard, who, lately a civilian, had just been created a 
Major. This was the gentleman, Major Hewitt, who 
confessed before the commission that he gave the mys- 
terious order in the name of Colonel Ford, to retreat 
from the breastworks. He stated before the commis- 
sion that he did this in compliance with a general 
order from Miles, that if they were hard pushed, they 
should spike and roll down the guns, and abandon 
the heights. By examining the circumstances, how- 
ever, we may form a more satisfactory conclusion. 
He, too, had a life to preserve, as precious as Colonel 
Ford's. Therefore, while the fighting was going on 
at the breastworks, he remained in the vicinity of the 
" lookout, " behind trees and bushes. When the 
movement of the enemy toward our rear was attempted 
and repulsed, rather a lively flight of bullets must 
have disturbed the privacy of the venerable Major. 
Skulkers, too, may have passed him on their way to 
the rear, and given him startling accounts of flanking 
movements, etc. The wounded officers and men were 
also borne past him ; till the brave Major thought the 



76 The Adventures of One Thousand Boys in Blue. 

moment indicated by his superior officer had surely 
come ; and he gave the order to retreat. 

Thus miserably planned and executed was the 
" defense of a position on which depended the safety 
of 11,000 men and immense stores of ordnance and 
supplies, the loss of which was irreparable to the 
Union, and an incalculable gain to its enemies." The 
story of Acting Adjutant Barkas and other skulkers, 
told at McGteath's Battery, found easy credence ; it 
was to be expected that raw troops would be the first 
to run ; and the recreant officers, finding it a conve- 
nient screen for their own cowardice and neglect of 
duty, gave it wide circulation. We trust the simple 
narratives we have given, written without collusion, 
and yet agreeing in important particulars, will be 
believed, and will do tardy justice to these raw 
recruits. To us, the wonder is that men untrained to 
arms, many having been only once or twice practiced 
in loading and firing, and facing an enemy for the 
first time in their lives, should have shown such pluck 
and coolness. 



Chapter V J 



JUR troops having all been withdrawn from the 
heights at about half-past four p m., the troops 
of the enemy in Pleasant Valley were advanced. 
Cobb's Brigade took possession of Sandy Hook with 
little resistance, the Union forces, 1,500 in number, 
having abandoned it on the 11th, leaving several hun- 
dred new muskets and other stores. The enemy now 
had complete command of the roads leading east from 
the Ferry. Jackson had, as we have related, driven 
in the garrisons at Winchester and Martinsburg ; Cobb 
that of Sandy Hook ; Keeshaw and Baeksdale those 
on Maryland Heights ; like sheep to a slaughter pen, 
all were driven to that fatal spot where they must 
surrender or die. Had there been a preconcerted plan 
to get as many of our troops together as possible, and 
deliver them bound hand and foot to the enemy, it 
could not have been better arranged. And Fkankun, 
with his army of 15,000 men, was less than " five 
miles away !" 

It will be remembered that we had two Brigades on 
Bolivar Heights, facing eastward, to repel the advance 
of Jackson, with a Battery at each extremity Colo- 
nel Miles' headquarters were in Bolivar, as was the 
hospital and another Battery. 



78 The Adventures of 

The morning of the 14th was employed by the enemy 
in cutting a road to the top of Maryland Heights, 
practicable for artillery ; and by two o'clock they had 
pieces in position which threw shells into Bolivar. 
The rebel General Walker, who had reached his 
assigned position on the evening of the 13th, 
opened fire from Loudon Heights, and Stonewall 
Jackson, who never failed to be "up to time" 
when he was needed, had Batteries planted at many 
points. But toward evening of this day McLaws, 
who kept himself every moment informed, by spies, 
couriers, signal parties, &c, of the condition of affairs 
in his neighborhood, heard what to us would have 
been the joyful tidings, that " the enemy," as they 
called it, that is, Feanklin' s army, had forced Cramp- 
ton' s Gap (the southern pass through South Moun- 
tain), and was entering Pleasant Valley, whence it 
could easily relieve Harper's Ferry, or assail their 
newly won position on Maryland Heights. This news 
filled the rebel commander with anxiety He instantly 
ordered reinforcements to General Cobb, in Pleasant 
Valley, and was making dispositions to meet the 
changed aspect of affairs, when, fortunately for him, 
but most unfortunately for the garrison, night came 
on and checked our advancing forces. 

All the evening of the 13th our men had seen the 
signalling of the rebels from the various heights, and 
knew they were concentrating their efforts for a final 
attack on the doomed garrison. On the morning of 
the 14th the signalling was continued, and Batteries 
were seen to be planted. And our troops were entirely 



One Thousand Boys in Blue 79 

unprotected and shelterless. Seeing this, the 9th Ver- 
mont, the 126th New York and Captain Potts' Bat- 
tery set to work at about half-past ten in the morning, 
and constructed a rude work of logs and earth, stuff- 
ing in tents, clothing, army blankets, anything that 
would break the force of a ball ; and dug a sort of 
trench or line of rifle pits. But for this precaution, 
which seems to have been taken without orders from 
the superior authorities, many more would have per- 
ished in the terrible storm of shot and shell that was 
afterward poured in upon them. Just as this extem- 
porized work was finished, and our men were prepar- 
ing their well-earned dinner, the first shot from Loudon 
Heights came plunging down among the cavalry and 
Quartermaster's teams, at the foot of Bolivar Heights, 
causing great commotion in that quarter. Some of 
the shells reached Bolivar Heights, but from so great 
a distance that their motion was slow, and they 
could be dodged. Our batteries replied with great 
spirit. 

" One shell exploded a caisson on the north end of 
Bolivar Heights, and sent up a beautiful cylindrical 
column of white smoke, sixty or seventy feet high. 
From Maryland Heights came shell which exploded 
before they reached us, showing a fleecy white cloud 
with a spiteful flash in its center, and giving our boys 
their first experience of ' bombs bursting in air.' "* 

All the afternoon, dense clouds of dust indicated the 
approach of the enemy on the Halltown and Charles - 
town roads, driving in our cavalry from the west. They 

* Lieutenant Kiciiardson's diary. 



80 The Adventures of 

attempted to place a Battery on the Halltown road, 
but shots from our guns dispersed them. " They 
then shelled the woods in our front, and our cavalry 
rushed out wildly, like frightened birds."* About five 
there was a gleam of hope among our ill-fated troops 
that succor was approaching. Firing had been heard 
all day toward the east and northeast ; and now two 
parallel lines of soldiers and cavalry, with sections of 
Batteries were seen advancing on the two roads near 
the Potomac ; might they not be our troops ? But soon 
came a check to any such hopes, in the shape of 
shells from the advancing bodies, to start up any 
game that might be concealed in the woods and 
ravines around us. At night the enemy advanced 
close in our front, driving in our pickets after a slight 
skirmish, from the low ridge and shallow valley at the 
foot of Bolivar Heights. On the left, on the little hill 
near the Shenandoah, which our men had cleared of 
woods on Sunday, we had two Regiments posted. The 
enemy charged on them with that characteristic yell, 
which afterward became so familiar to our ears, but 
which then sounded like the yelp of an animal. Our 
forces there were driven in, and that position was 
taken and two Batteries placed there. 

It was at this time that the cavalry, amounting to 
about 2,000, declared they would not stay to be sold 
to the enemy, but would escape at all hazards. Miles 
angrily forbade them to leave. For reply, they dashed 
out of the place, cut their way out by the Sharpsburg 
road, capturing 100 prisoners and a rebel wagon train, 
* Lieutenant Richakdson's diary. 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 81 

and escaped into Pennsylvania. But for this piece of 
gallantry, they too would have been victims of Miles' 
stupidity or treachery 

Gloomily the night settled down upon the soldiers. 
They lay down in ranks as they had stood ; every 
man by his fellow's side, grasping the arms that all 
felt were now useless ; and most true it was that 
"they bitterly thought of the morrow." "Cannon to 
the right of them, cannon to the left of them, cannon 
in front of them," aye, and cannon in their rear; 
every height crowned with guns, and all pointed 
toward the fatal hill and plain where our army slept, 
or waked, through that long night. A post fortified 
by nature as few places are ; furnished with all the 
munitions of war; and with 11,500 brave, earnest 
hearts to guard it, was about to be yielded up with 
scarcely a struggle, by a miserable sympathizer with 
secession. Especially was this a bitter night to the 
126th. Fresh from the recruiting camps where every- 
thing had been said to excite their patriotism and urge 
them to quit themselves like men ; they had found 
.themselves compelled, on the 13th, to abandon a posi- 
tion that they felt quite capable of defending ; and 
now, instead of winning glory on the battle field, they 
were to be shot down in their ranks, with little oppor- 
tunity of resistance ; or, what was infinitely worse, 
they might be carried to southern prisons, where, in 
torture and famine, their lives and their memories 
would rot. Bitter as these reflections were, they would 
have been far more so, could these fated men have 
foreseen that almost the whole blame and disgrace of 



82 The Advextures of 

that disastrous day, the 13th September, 1862, was to 
rest on the 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

If the morning dawned drearily on our garrison, it 
was not without its anxieties to the rebel commander. 
We have said that he knew what our soldiers did not 
know, that McClellax's victorious army was at 
hand, having forced the passes of the South Moun- 
tain. His duty was three-fold : to face the enemy 
coming through Crampton's gap ; to prevent the 
Union garrison from escaping and joining their friends 
at the gap ; and to hold the Weverton pass, at the 
south end of the South Mountain. He withdrew the 
Brigades of Kershaw and Babksdale, except one 
Regiment of the latter and two pieces of artillery, 
from Maryland Heights. Expecting an advance of 
McClellan's army through Pleasant Valley on the 
15th, he made a show of opposition there, drawing a 
line of troops, which he confesses was a thin one, 
across that valley But, as he says, "they did not 
advance, nor did they offer any opposition to my 
troops taking position across the valley." We can 
hardly account for the non-advance of Fraxklix's 
force on the morning of the 15th. Its van was thrown 
forward into Pleasant Valley the evening before, and 
if it had pushed onward toward Maryland Heights on 
that fatal morning, it seems as if they might have 
been recaptured. But this was a part of McClel- 
lan's army, which had a habit of stopping to rumi- 
nate on its laurels after a victory 

The morning of the 15th showed still more clearly 
to the 126th and the other Regiments how miserable 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 83 

had been the mismanagement of the commanding offi- 
cer. Not only had the heights, which were the key to 
the whole position, been insufficiently defended and 
unnecessarily abandoned, but even the little triangle 
between the two rivers and Bolivar Heights seemed as 
if left to be taken possession of by the rebels. Into 
this place, as to a stronghold, had come the garrisons 
of Winchester, Martinsburg and Sandy Hook ; here 
the new Regiments had been brought as if to defend 
it to the last extremity ; and yet, except the hastily 
constructed works which some of the troops threw up 
without orders, there was not a shadow of a fortifica- 
tion. A good wagon road lay at the foot of the 
bluffs, along the Shenandoah, unguarded ; the small 
hill which gave the enemy so merciless a position for 
their guns was insufficiently defended and easily 
taken ; no guard at the ravines prevented them from 
ascending the bluffs ; all seemed arranged for the 
accommodation of the assailants instead of the secu- 
rity of the assailed. 

As the mists arose from the mountains, the rebels 
began firing from the Batteries they had got into posi- 
tion the night before. The course of the shells from 
the heights of Loudon and Maryland could be traced 
by the sound before they struck, but the Battery on 
the little hill threw shells that could not be dodged. 
As one of the officers says, "the Hash, the whistling 
shriek and the explosion came all at once." Then 
another Battery opened from an eminence across the 
Shenandoah of about same elevation as the plateau 

of Bolivar. These were effective in our rear. 
6 



84 The Adventures of 

Our Batteries replied with spirit, killing and wound- 
ing, as we knew afterward, several of their men 
and some officers. Soon came shells from the guns 
on the Halltown road, our left front, from another 
on our right front, and from a third directly in front. 
"The Batteries on Maryland and Loudon Heights got 
our exact range, and sent shot and shell tearing in 
among us." Two in succession fall in Company B, 
killing seven and wounding others. One drops in 
Company H, tearing off the head of the 2d Lieutenant 
and wounding many privates. In Company D, one is 
killed and one wounded. But we cannot follow the 
sickening details. Shells from all directions crash in 
among the living masses. Our Batteries reply till the 
long range ammunition gives out, and Colonel Trim- 
ble, by order of Colonel Miles, displays a white 
flag. Our Batteries cease firing, and soon the enemy 
•ceases also. But before Trimble with his white 
"rag," as the soldiers call it, can reach the Battery 
on the left, it fires two shots, on which the enemy 
•opens again. Miles leaves his covert, and rushes 
down on foot with an aid, and when near Captain 
Phillips, Company D, orders him to raise something, 
anything white, in token of surrender. Phillips 

says, "For ^'s sake, Colonel, don't surrender us. 

Don't you hear the signal guns? Our forces are near 
us. Let us cut our way out and join them." Miles 
replies that the situation of things renders this impos- 
sible. He says, too, "they will blow us out of this 
in half an hour." Phillips still expostulates ; says 
that if, even with the loss of a thousand men, the 



Oxe Thousand Boys ix Blue. 85 

place with its invaluable stores can be held till relief 
comes, it ought to be done. Miles said, "Do you 
know who I am?" Phillips said, "I do; you are 
Colonel Miles," and turned to walk away, when a 
fragment of shell struck Miles' leg, tearing the flesh 
from the bone. Miles fell, and Phillips was heard 
to say, "Good!" "and the rest felt it if they did not 
say it." It was difficult to find a man who would 
take him to the hospital. Captain Lee, of Company 
A, while attempting to raise him, was hit by a piece 
of shell. This was a little after eight o'clock, a. m. 
Miles was taken to the hospital in an ambulance. 
The white flag in Colonel Trimble's hand, and one 
on our works, attracted the notice of the enemy, as 
did the cessation of our fire. At a quarter to nine 
their firing had ceased altogether. So fell Harper's 
Ferry 

General Jacksox rode along the union lines drawn 
up on Bolivar Heights. Generals A. P Hill and 
Julius White arranged terms of surrender, which 
were agreed on at ten a. m. Arms, accoutre- 
ments, ammunition, military stores, eveiything, Avere 
turned over to the enemy Swinton says: "Jackson 
received the capitulation of 12,000 men, and came into 
possession of seventy-three pieces of artillery, in, 000 
small arms, and a large quantity of military stores. 
But leaving tin 1 details to be arranged by his Lieuten- 
ant (General Hill), the swift-footed Jackson turned 
his back on the prize he had secured, and headed 
toward Maryland to unite with Lee, who was eagerly 
awaiting his arrival at Sharpsburg." 



86 The Adventures of 

The officers being allowed to keep their side arms, 
and the garrison their private property, the troops 
were paroled ; engaging not to serve against the con- 
federates until exchanged. 

Thus have we stated the bare facts. But as we are 
writing for those who are deeply interested in all that 
concerns the Regiment, we will go a little more into 
detail. 

There was, of course, much curiosity among our 
men to see the redoutable Stonewall Jackson and 
his troops. Many anecdotes had circulated among 
them of his stern, inflexible discipline, combined with 
an almost fanatic devotion. Believing himself heaven- 
led, he pressed forward in any enterprise with an 
unfaltering purpose, and his ardor communicated itself 
to his troops. If he had faith in himself, they had 
unbounded faith in him. Immediately after the sur- 
render, his troops, who had been massed on Bolivar 
plateau, were drawn up in line. Jackson, on a 
"clay-bank" colored (that is cream-colored) horse, in 
plain dress like a common cavalry-man, rode along 
their line, greeted by yells and cries of enthusiasm, 
the men tossing their hats high into the air ; to which 
he replied by lifting his cap as he rode along. The 
men astonished our soldiers by the poverty of their 
clothing and equipments, their sallow, hungry faces, 
their long, tangled hair and slouched hats, and their 
gaunt frames which seemed nothing but bone and 
muscle covered with a bronzed skin. Officers and men 
were alike ragged, filthy and covered with vermin. 
The officers said it was impossible to prevent this ; 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 87 

and so it undoubtedly was among men accustomed to 
depend for their every personal comfort on the service 
of slaves ; men who held labor to be a degradation, 
even if it was the labor of keeping themselves clean. 
{They were accustomed to say, they could tell "a 
Yank ' ' by the brightness of his musket. Their own 
were always rusty ) Our men wondered less at the 
rapidity with which they traveled from place to place, 
when they saw that they were unencumbered with 
knapsacks and that they carried no tents. A blanket, 
haversack and canteen ; that was their whole equip- 
ment except their arms. " Like greyhounds " they 
scoured the country, snatching and eating their food 
when and where they could get it, and going without 
when none was to be had. Ears of soft, green corn, 
roasted and eaten with a little salt, of which many of 
them had small bags preserved very carefully, were 
often their only food for days. Desertions must have 
been frequent, for the smallness of their Regiments 
impressed our men. They complimented our raw 
troops on their fighting on Maryland Heights, and 
said that ' ' three Brigades were opposed to us, and 
that they had never seen better firing." 

Jackson soon left with a large part of his force to 
join Lee at Sharpsburg. But the men who remained 
had much talk with our troops about the war. They 
treated the paroled prisoners with personal respect, 
but insisted that our conduct of the war had been a 
series of failures and would continue to be so ; and 
that all they wanted was to be let alone. They did 
not want our territory ; why should we invade theirs *■. 



88^ The Adventures of 

This was the burden of each man's argument ; and 
undoubtedly the motive that was continually urged on 
them by their leaders was, that they were fighting to 
defend their property, their homes and their families, 
from the ravages of a brutal invader. 

And now ensued a scene which to our liberty-loving 
young northerners was in the highest degree revolting. 

During the long sojourn of the union army at Har- 
per's Ferry, large numbers of slaves had escaped into 
our lines. The old and helpless and the little children, 
as well as able-bodied men and women, who thought 
the hour had come for which they had prayed and 
longed through many a weary year, the hour of free- 
dom, had gathered under the flag which to them was 
its starry symbol. Alas, in surrendering Harper's 
Ferry to the rebels, Miles re-surrendered these hap- 
less human beings to the slavery from which they 
fondly hoped they had escaped forever ! Throughout 
that dismal 15th, fierce-eyed, lank, half-savage men, 
armed with long, cruel whips, rushed in to claim 
"their property;" and with oaths and curses, drove 
before them from their new-found liberty into bondage, 
the helpless, despairing blacks. The crack of the 
whip, its cuts across the shoulders of the women and 
children who flagged ; the anguish, the speechless 
misery of those who lost in a moment the hope of 
their lifetime and almost their faith in a just God, 
formed a scene never to be forgotten. And it is 
dreadful to think that just such a scene ensued at 
each similar reverse which our army experienced !* 

* An incident which occurred about this time, shows that at least one 
chattel could take care of himself without the aid of a master. Jim, a col- 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 89 

At about nine a. m. on Tuesday, the garrison of 
Harper's Ferry left Bolivar Heights and took up its 
line of march for Annapolis, the men under their 
respective officers and in order. The sick and 
wounded remained in the general hospital under 
charge of Surgeon Vosbukgh and Assistant Surgeon 
Hoyt. The place was held by rebel cavalry, com- 
manded at first by General Stuart, and afterward by 
Colonel Thomas. They held the place as the right 
flank of their army during the battle at Antietam ; 
and evacuated it Friday evening, September 19th. 
Surgeon Hoyt states that the sick and wounded 
were kindly treated by rebel officers ; and protected 
amid the raids of citizens who thronged in, in pur- 
suit of escaped slaves. The rebels destroyed almost 
everything of a public nature. On Tuesday as our 
men were leaving, the drilling into the railroad 
bridge preparatory to blowing it up, was going on. 
The pontoon bridge, cars and government buildings, 
were destroyed on Thursday On Saturday the van 
of McClellan's army, approaching from Pleasant 
Yalley, entered the place ; the enemy having as we 
have stated, departed the previous night. 

ored "boy," one of the refugees in Harper's Ferry, had been employed on 
Bolivar Heights as a servant by Captain Phillips and Lieutenant Ricii- 
akdsox. When, on Sunday morning, it became evident that a surrender of 
the post was inevitable, these officers gave Jim a musket with ammunition 
and some necessaries, and told him he might escape if he could. Early on 
Monday morning, he contrived to cross the Potomac, crawled through the 
woods on Maryland Heights, and as his gun was an encumbrance, threw it 
away; wormed his way through the rebel pickets, and afterward through 
our pickets at South Mountain, and so on through Frederick to Monocacj' 
Station, where Lieutenant R. found him when on his way to Annapolis 
with the paroled prisoners. Once he had been seen and fired on by the 
rebels, but escaped them. 



90 The Adventures of 

It may be proper to say a few words here of him 
who was the immediate cause of all this disgrace and 
disaster, Colonel Miles. We would not needlessly dis- 
turb the ashes of even the dishonored dead ; but when 
necessary to the vindication of the living, it is a false 
delicacy that would withhold the truth. The brave 
line officers and enlisted men of the 126th fell after- 
ward, on many battle-fields, with the disgraceful sen- 
tence branded on their hearts, " Harper's Ferry 
cowards !" A few, and but a few, and some of them 
scarred and maimed, have survived the many battles 
in which they afterward fought gloriously ; and they 
are compelled to read, in a history intended for immor- 
tality, these words : " Colonel E. Sherrill, 126th 
New York Volunteers, being severely wounded, his 
Regiment broke and fled in utter rout, and the remain- 
ing Regiments soon followed the example, alleging an 
order to retreat from Major Hewitt, who denied hav- 
ing given it.* They were rallied after running a short 
distance, and re-occupied part of the ground they had 
so culpably abandoned, but did not regain their breast- 
work, and of course left the enemy in a commanding 
position." [The accuracy of the whole account is 
exemplified by a sentence which follows : "At two 
o'clock the next morning, Ford, without being farther 
assailed, abandoned the heights, spiking his guns," &c. 
The heights, according to all the accounts, rebel and 
Union, were abandoned at four and a half, p. m., on 
the 13th, the day of the fight at the breastwork. 

* Major Hewitt acknowledged before the Commission that he gave the 
order, under instructions from Miles that, if very hard pushed, he should 
spike his guns and retreat to Bolivar Heights. 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 91 

McLaws says : " By four and a half, p. m., we had 
entire possession of the heights."] 

But a careful examination of all the accounts seems 
to prove that to Miles, and not to the 126th, was 
chargeable the disgraceful abandonment of Maryland 
Heights, as well as the surrender of Harper's Ferry 
He made no examination, either in person or by his 
engineers, of the heights, and directed no fortifications. 
He put in command there a scheming politician, 
utterly unacquainted with military science, and gave 
him no instructions to examine or fortify the position. 
He supplied him neither with intrenching tools (except 
ten axes) nor with Batteries ; nor with troops, except 
his own Regiment and a few Marylanders of doubtful 
loyalty, who had fled to the heights from some 
unknown quarter. Knowing that both armies, the 
confederates and our own, were approaching, he made 
no attempt to inform himself of the movements of 
either ; (whereas the enemy had signal parties on 
every height, and knew every movement of friend and 
foe.) When, on the 12th, he found that the garrison 
at Sandy Hook was driven in, and that Ford would 
immediately be attacked, he grudgingly dispatched a 
Regiment of perfectly raw recruits to his assistance ; 
but scarcely had they started from camp when they 
were unaccountably recalled, and marched back to 
Bolivar Heights, where they were detained some hours, 
giving the enemy time to bring up a large force from 
Pleasant Valley to the top of the mountain, and then 
they were ordered to the heights again. He ordered 
Fokd, if too hard pushed, to spike his guns and aban- 



92 The Adventures of 

don the heights ; instead of commanding him to hold 
them " if he had to withdraw every man from Bolivar 
to do it." 

Bnt a defense has been set up that he interpreted 
too literally Halleck's order to hold Harper's Ferry 
to the last extremity (This is supposing him to be a 
fool ; for any sane man could see that if Maryland 
Heights were taken, Harper's Ferry must fall.) But tak- 
ing even this view, how was that post itself defended % 
A few Batteries were placed here and there, and some 
trees cleared from the bluffs, but not a breastwork, 
not a trench, not a rifle-pit was made by order of 
Colonel Miles, during the whole siege. When the 
cavalry, on the 14th, resolved to cut their way out, 
Miles sternly forbade them. "He paroled, on the 
thirteenth, sixteen rebel prisoners, authorizing them to 
pass out of our lines into those of the enemy." 
"Another rebel, an officer named Rouse, who had 
been captured and escaped, being retaken, was allowed 
a private interview with Miles, and thereupon paroled 
to go without our lines. He, still under parole, 
appeared in arms at the head of his men, among the 
first to enter our lines after the surrender /" 

Looking at all the circumstances, does it not appear 
as if the enemy were allowed, nay almost invited, to 
bring every engine of destruction to bear upon the 
devoted garrison, on the fatal 15th, in order that the 
surrender might seem to be unavoidable? And it was 
unavoidable. Certainly, under the circumstances, 
Miles was obliged to raise the white flag. He and 
the garrison were utterly at the mercy of the enemy. 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 93 

Death for all, or surrender, was the alternative. It 
was true, as Miles said, "they would all be blown 
out of that in half an hour." If his plan really was 
what his conduct indicated, he had gained his pur- 
pose. Greeley, in his work, from which we have 
quoted, calls him either a fool or a traitor. We say, 
what Colonel Stevens said of him to Colonel Rich- 
ardson, at the first Bull Run battle, "he was 
DRUNK." 

He perished miserably After his fearful wound, he 
was borne to the hospital, and three of our surgeons 
watched him alternately, an hour at a time, and did 
all in their power to alleviate his agony, until his 
death. He died in torture unutterable. His body was 
placed in a rude coffin (the b^st that could be 
obtained) and carried to Baltimore. His spirit went 
to its dread audit. 

A dashing sensational writer in the New York Times, 
of September, 1862, David Judd by name, pretends 
to give an account of the engagement on Maryland 
Heights. His description is just such a mixture of 
truth and error as might be expected from one who 
confesses his position to have been at McGrath s 
Battery (Avhere, at all events, he had good company), 
more than a mile from the scene of action, and sepa- 
rated from it by a dense wood. We will criticize 
some of his statements. He says " the enemy tried to 
flank us on the rigid, but were repulsed by a handful 
of Maryland men." The right of our position was a 
precipitous rocky slope, and quite unassailable by the 
enemy "Colonel Siikuuill," he says, "dismounting 



94 The Adventures of 

from his horse, and with a loaded revolver in each 
hand," &c. Colonel Sherbill was not mounted while 
on the heights, except on the logs of the breastworks, 
and did not dismount from them until shot. However, 
at the distance of a mile and a quarter, and through 
a perspective of thick forest and underbrush, the 
sapient correspondent is excusable for mistaking a log 
for a charger. He says, " the enemy succeeding in 
turning our left flank, we were obliged to fall back 
for some distance," &c. The enemy did not succeed 
in turning our left flank, while we were at the breast- 
works, but were repulsed with the loss of many men. 
He says, " First Lieutenant Samuel Barras, Acting 
Adjutant of the 126th, showed so much coolness while 
endeavoring to rally his wavering companies, as to 
attract the attention of Colonel Miles." Adjutant 
Barras being mostly at the Battery, or the spring 
near it, during the action, had for companions this 
correspondent and several superior officers who should 
have been on the heights. How much coolness he 
showed while there is better known to this correspond- 
ent and those officers than to the brave young recruits 
who were so green as to imagine it their duty to fight 
the enemy, and not seek personal safety beyond the 
reach of bullets. 

He is right in one statement : " Who gave the order 
for evacuation, I am unable to say ; but every soldier 
was ready to stigmatize its author as a coward or a 
traitor." But he is in fault when he adds : "And 
yet it may have been best, under the circumstances. 
Had more troops been drawn from Bolivar Heights, 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 95 

for the defense of the large guns, our position there 
might have been so much weakened that we could not 
repel an attack in that direction." Our artillery on 
Maryland Heights, if properly managed, could have 
checked the advance of the enemy to Bolivar Heights, 
as effectually as it did the May preceding. 

This correspondent is more correct in his account of 
what followed. He says : " Sunday morning came, 
but with it no signs of the enemy Our guns and 
camps on the mountain remained just as we left them." 
[A slight error. A detachment of the Garibaldi 
Guards and Vermont troops went up on Sunday and 
brought away the light guns that were left on the 
heights.] One rifled six-pounder and one twelve- 
pounder Napoleon guarded the bridge, and prevented 
an attack from Sandy Hook. Colonel Trimble's Brig- 
ade, consisting of the 32d and 60th Ohio, the 125th 
and 126th New York, 9th Vermont and Bjgby's Bat- 
tery, with a detachment of Maryland troops, occupied 
the extreme left. Hour after hour passed, until two 
o'clock, Avhen they opened a furious fire from Loudon 
and Maryland Heights and Sandy Hook with Howit- 
zers. Citizens and soldiers sought shelter where they 
could. Our artillery replied with much spirit, Cap- 
tains McGrath and Guaham, of the 5th Artillery, 
silencing the Loudon Batteries. The enemy opened 
two more guns on the Shepardstown and a full Battery 
on the Charleston roads. Heavy cannonading was 
brought to bear on us from five different points. Yet 
we held our own manfully, until it closed at sunset. 
About dusk the enemy in our front opened a musketry 



96 The Adventures of 

fire on our left, replied to by the 32d Ohio, 9th Ver- 
mont and 1st Maryland. It continued some time, 
when we were obliged to contract our lines, the rebels 
having turned our left flank. An attempt, at about 
eight o'clock, to storm Rigby's Battery, which did 
fatal execution (among the enemy), signally failed. 
Our men slept on their arms. During the night the 
125th New York fell back to a ravine nearly at right 
angles to our line of defense, and the 9th Vermont 
changed position so as to support Rigby's Battery 
The enemy opened fire on Bolivar Heights at five 
the next morning, which was replied to until our long- 
range ammunition gave out. Their Batteries were so 
arranged as to enfilade us completely. To hold out 
longer seemed madness. A murmur of disapprobation 
ran along the lines when it was found we had surren- 
dered. Captain McG-rath burst into tears, and said, 
'Boys, we've got no country now.' Other officers were 
equally grieved, and the soldiers were enraged. Yet, 
what else could be done ? The rebel Batteries had 
opened on us from seven different directions. 

" I afterward learned from rebel officers that the 
forces beleaguering us were not far short of 100,000 ; 
probably about 80,000. General D. H. Hill's army, 
consisting of several Divisions, was posted on Mary- 
land Heights ; Walker, with several Brigades, on 
Loudon. Those directly in front (west) of us were 
commanded by Stonewall Jackson and A. P Hill. 

"As soon as the terms of surrender were completed, 
A. P Hill and Jackson rode into town ; old Stone- 
wall dressed in the coarsest of homespun, and dirty 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 97 

at that ; in appearance no way to be distinguished 
from the mongrel, barefoot crew who follow his for- 
tunes. I had heard much of the decayed appearance 
of the rebel soldiers ; but such a looking crowd ! 
Ireland, in her worst straits, could present no parallel. 
Yet they glory in their shame. The articles surrend- 
ered were many guns, and six days' rations for 12,000 
men. But few horses were taken, the cavalry having 
secured them." 

Some remarks in a letter from Lieutenant Seamans, 
written just after the surrender, are so much to the 
point, that, at the risk of repetition, we will make 
brief extracts : 

" As near as I can understand the geography of the 
country, the only approach to Maryland Heights from 
Frederick (he means from Pleasant Valley) is through 
Solomon's Gap, a few miles north of the lookout. 
This is a very narrow ravine, and easily defended. 
The rebel forces commenced pressing through this some 
time on Wednesday (Thursday ?), and nothing was 
done to check their advance until Friday * * * On 
the 14th Loudon Heights was occupied with a rebel 
Battery, where we should have had one. There we 
had been idle for twO weeks, knowing the enemy was 
at Winchester, because our forces had evacuated it ; 
and then the rebels advanced upon the south side of 
the Shenandoah with their battery, and secured a 
splendid position ; one we could and should have had 
without opposition five days before. By this you can 
see, knowing the position of the ferry and the heights 
on the east and south, that they had two as formidable 



98 The Adventures of 

places as nature could make, and I assure you they 
were well used. 

" While our forces were on the heights, Friday after- 
noon, General White was also retreating from Mar- 
tinsburg, before a heavy force, and supposing Miles 
had, from his long familiarity with the place, a per- 
fect knowledge of its strong and weak points, he gave 
up the command to him. Saturday passed away, and 
on Sunday we had the fire from the position we were 
forced to abandon to them, and from Loudon Heights, 
and three batteries on the Martinsburg road. * * * 

" 'Twas a strange scene for a Sabbath day Our own 
Batteries were belching forth fire and smoke, and 
missiles of death. * * * With the neighing 
of horses, the confusion of orders, the discharge 
of our artillery, and the hissing and screeching of 
shot and shell discharged at us, 'twas a strange 
medley for a Sabbath day's worship. That night 
we lay uncovered in our cold wet trenches. Our 
acting Brigadier, Trimble, requested Miles to let us 
cut our way out, but was peremptorily refused. The 
Colonel of the cavalry also made the same request, 
and he was refused ; but in disobedience to orders, the 
cavalry did cut their way out safely * * * yy e 
could have followed without heavy loss. And now to 
show the full measure of iniquity * * * On Friday 
night I was officer of the whole line of pickets, about 
one and one-half miles in extent. Station No. 1 was 
on the Martinsburg road, about one mile out ; there I 
had twenty-five men. Station No. 2 was inside that, 
at four corners where the road turns to go to Win- 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 99 

Chester ; and still inside this I had some twenty-five 
smaller stations, running from the corner of the camp 
to the west half a mile, then turning south and 
extending to the railroad leading to Winchester, and 
three stations on the Winchester railroad about one- 
fourth of a mile. About two o'clock on Friday, eight 
paroled rebel prisoners were sent to station No. 2, 
where they should have gone, and there having no 
pass from Colonel Miles they were sent back again. 
After they were passed to this post, they had seen all 
our pickets that were on the route to Winchester, and 
therefore could have done us no further damage by 
being passed through that station after receiving their 
pass. Instead of this, Colonel Miles, after giving 
them a proper pass, sent them the whole length of the 
picket line to the west, and so down to the railroad, 
past all the pickets, to Winchester. And now for the 
result : On Sunday night, within that same picket 
line, there was a battery planted that did fearful exe- 
cution," etc., etc. * * * Then follows an account 
of the fearful shelling Sunday morning. 



Chapter Y J J 



|T was a sad march for the paroled Eegiments 
from Harper's Ferry to Annapolis. It was a 
retrograde movement, which is always unplea- 
sant ; their destination was unknown to them ; they 
were disappointed men. After enlisting with bright 
anticipations of serving through the war, they were, 
after three weeks service, and from no fault of their 
own, prisoners on parole, to be sent they knew not 
whither. That one hundred-mile march was a long 
and weary one. With no provisions but the two 
day's rations allowed by the enemy, and two more 
received at Monocacy, which consisted of "hard 
tack" and uneatable "live bacon,' ' and compelled to 
sleep at night on the ground, in one instance where 
a cavalry fight had occurred a day or two before, and 
the effluvium from dead animals was pestilential, their 
condition was not enviable. On the 17th they heard 
the guns at Antietam, and saw Regiments marching 
off briskly to the scene of action. But for Miles' 
stupidity or faithlessness the// might still have been at 
Harper's Ferry, relieved by the army of the Potomac; 
perhaps driving the enemy back into "Virginia ; per- 
haps preventing the battle of Antietam. These reflec- 
tions did not sweeten the long toil of marching. On 



102 The Adventures of 

Thursday, the 18th, they reached the Monocacy, and 
had the relief of bathing in its cool, clear waters, 
after which they marched to Annapolis, the sick and 
the baggage going by the cars. Henry T. Antis, 
hospital steward, took charge of the sick of the 126th, 
who reached Annapolis Friday forenoon, and took np 
their quarters in a piece of woods a mile and a half 
west of the city. The rest of the paroled men reached 
there Sunday night, tired enough after their long 
march and night exposures. 

At Annapolis they found refreshment. Bathing in 
the bay, catching fish, and digging oysters and crabs 
was great relief and amusement. The sea, with its 
wonders, was a novelty to most of them, which they 
enjoyed to the full. And here they got good rations : 
coffee and sugar, fresh beef, potatoes, beans and 
onions, with pepper and salt, and good cooking uten- 
sils, seemed to them very great luxuries. The troops 
spent Monday and Tuesday mending their garments 
and looking about the old and strange city Several 
of the buildings are two centuries old. In the Capitol, 
which is a large building, they visited the identical 
room, the Senate chamber, in which Washington 
resigned his commission. Here they found a large 
historical painting commemorating that event, by 
which it appears that the furniture of the room is 
much the same now as it was then. The City Hotel, 
also 200 years old, and built of bricks brought from 
England, was pointed out ; also General Washing- 
ton's head-quarters, and many other interesting locali- 
ties. 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 103 

While here, they were visited by Adjutant-Gene- 
ral Thomas, and other officers of high rank, all 
very curious about the Harper's Ferry disaster. And 
here the Lieutenant-Colonel of the Regiment, James 
M. Bull, who had received his commission just 
before the Regiment left, and had leave of absence 
to settle up his private business and prepare 
for service, joined his Regiment. Dr. Peltiee 
had been dispatched from Harper's Ferry to Balti- 
more for medical stores on the 4th of September, had 
procured them and was returning, when the rebels 
got possession of Frederick city and cut off all com- 
munication between east and west Maryland. He had, 
therefore, been unable to return, and was met by and 
joined the army at York. 

Many soldiers who had been prisoners in Belle Isle 
were here, in the usual miserable condition of such 
prisoners. 

Among the incidents mentioned in Lieutenant Rich- 
ardson's diary, is the brutal conduct of some paroled 
Ohio soldiers. A sutler, who had a rude store fifty 
by twenty-five feet, made of rough boards, kept a 
large stock of provisions which he sold to the sol- 
diers, also furnishing them with warm meals, and all 
at fair prices. These Ohioans, upon a very slight pro- 
vocation, broke into the store, scattered all its contents 
among the crowd, tore the store to pieces, and used 
the lumber for firewood. This is what is called by 
some lawless Regiments "cleaning out a sutler," but 
seemed to our New York boys downright oppression 
and robbery 



104 The Adventures of 

On the 23d of September, the officers of the Regiment 
received their commissions from the Governor of New 
York ; time not allowing them to be made out before 
they left the State ; and the following morning the 
11,000 troops were marched to the Bay, to take passage 
in transports for Baltimore. Too few of these were 
provided, and they were crowded to suffocation, mak- 
ing the passage to Baltimore exceedingly unpleasant, 
and somewhat dangerous. After much rolling and 
pitching, and occasionally stopping the engines, they 
at length arrived at Baltimore toward evening, and were 
marched through the city to the Northern Central 
railway Their destination they understood to be Chi- 
cago, where they were to be armed and sent to fight 
Indians in Minnesota, being forbidden by parole to 
fight against the southern confederacy. 

In passing through Baltimore they had an oppor- 
tunity to witness the divided feeling which character- 
ized that city, and the whole State of Maryland. 
Rebel sympathizers (who were only kept quiet by 
certain black tubes which frowned ominously down 
upon the city from Fort McHenry and other elevations 
around) put as much contempt into their faces as they 
were capable of showing, which was not a little. 
Others cheered them heartily, thus showing what spirit 
they were of. But what especially struck the paroled 
men, was the solicitude of many professed Unionists, 
to obtain from them an admission that Colonel Miles 
did his duty patriotically ; that the surrender could 
not have been avoided. As no such admission could be 
obtained from the soldiers, the questioners were a good 



Oae Thousand Boys in Blue. 105 

deal chagrined and disappointed. Colonel Miles was in 
fact a Marylander, and no doubt a southerner at heart. 
The cars which were assigned to the troops were 
plain boxes, w T ith rough plank seats running all 
around. The rations corresponded with the sumptuous 
cars, and were excessively disgusting to the men who 
had just had a taste of civilized life at Annapolis. 
But at Pittsburg, where they arrived at three in the 
morning, the generous loyalty and kindness of the 
titizens made them forget the perils and troubles of 
the way. To be sure the first sight of that city was 
dismal enough. "Lurid flames from the tops of the 
tall chimneys served to make the deep darkness 
visible." But beneath this cloudy canopy they found 
noble, loyal, generous hearts. The sick were supplied 
with delicacies, and carried to hospitals, where they 
were carefully tended by woman's hands until fit to 
be sent back to their Regiments. Long tables were 
set in a very large public building, at which 1,000 or 
1,200 could be supplied at once ; and the city poured 
forth its abundance for these hungry and tired prison- 
ers. While they feasted, the ladies, who waited on 
them at table, filled their canteens with water for their 
journey Thus Pittsburg treated all loyal soldiers 
who traversed her great thoroughfare during the war. 
The telegraph would announce their approach ; and 
whether it was day or night ; whether from New 
England, New York or Pennsylvania, or the far 
west, the " boys in blue " were welcomed, cheered, 
refreshed and sent on their way rejoicing. A glorious 
record for the iron city. 



106 The Adventures of 

The feast in the hall was wound up with music, the 
band playing, and the glee club singing patriotic 
songs. After looking at some of the enormous guns 
cast at Pittsburg, and destined for our forts, the troops 
took the cars (box freight cars) for Chicago. 

In these a quiescent band might have suffocated ; 
but Yankee freemen love a free atmosphere, and 
these soon got it by the use of hatchets which let 
in daylight and fresh air. How the railroad com- 
pany liked these extemporized windows, we have no 
means of knowing ; probably they found them less 
agreeable and profitable than the soldiers did. The 
worst of their ride was their enforced hunger ; for 
not even the memory of Pittsburg fare could save 
them from that ; and their rations were uninviting 
enough. All day they traveled through Ohio and 
passed into Indiana in the night. In this State they 
received most unusual and welcome demonstrations of 
sympathy, and what was almost as pleasing, pies, 
cake, cheese, biscuit and other dainties which a sol- 
dier knows how to appreciate, and enjoys without the 
fear of dyspepsia before his eyes. Saturday, the 27th 
of September, saw the cars running down by their 
own momentum, the long, straight incline to the 
marshy ground south of Lake Michigan, and they 
arrived at Chicago just one month from the day they 
reached Sandy Hook on the Potomac. A varied expe- 
rience had they gone through in four short weeks ! 

The 126th were marched through the city and out 
to Camp Douglas, a hollow square surrounded by 
barracks. Fatigue and the darkness of a cloudy night 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 107 

prevented their realizing the condition of things 
(although one of their senses made them suspect it) ; 
and when ordered by those who were supposed to 
know what ought to be done, to lie down, they 
obeyed, although their bed was earth and their cover- 
ing the clouds. But the morning disclosed a scene of 
unexpected horrors. The camp had been crowded 
with rebel prisoners from Fort Donnelson and else- 
where, who had been recently exchanged, and left it 
empty of everything but filth, rats and other vermin 
not to be named to ears polite, which Burns called 
"crawlin' ferlies," and the Union soldiers dubbed 
"gray backs." How human beings could have existed 
in such quarters, nobody but a southern rebel knows ; 
and how the authorities at Washington could con- 
demn to such a pestilential prison-house paroled 
prisoners who had been guilty of no crime, seems 
utterly unaccountable. We boil with indignation at 
the remembrance of Andersonville, Belle Isle and the 
Lib by prisons, and we cannot be too indignant when 
we think of them. But some indignation must also 
arise at the carelessness that would condemn thousands 
of young men, many of whom had been tenderly nur- 
tured, and most of whom had friends to love and care 
for them, to a camp which would have been an 
unhealthy stable for cattle. But here the parallel, if 
there is one, between the Chicago barracks and south- 
ern prisons, ends. Our men were not forced, like the 
prisoners at Andersonville, Belle Isle, etc., to continue 
to occupy these quarters in their unclean and unwhole- 
some state. Nor, being northerners, did they do so. 



108 The Adventures of 

They, especially the New York and Vermont Regi- 
ments and some of the Ohio troops, belonged to a 
race which thinks it more degrading to be filthy than 
to work ; and to work they went at once. Brooms, 
brushes, soap and quicklime, were soon brought and 
put to use. Barracks were scraped, swept, scrubbed 
and whitewashed. Cook houses were renovated. By 
a culpable remissness in the commanding officer at the 
camp, carts were not furnished to carry off the impuri- 
ties, and they had to be buried on the spot ; a most 
unwholesome procedure. The sandy, saturated soil 
was strewed with quicklime ; bed ticks were dealt out 
and, filled with prairie hay, made tolerable beds ; 
bunks were put up and old ones repaired and cleansed. 
The men were marched to the lake to bathe ; clothes 
were washed ; and in a few days the camp was com- 
paratively decent. But poison lurked in the soil, 
which was two or three feet of sand resting on ' ' hard 
pan ;" and the rains and hot sun drew forth the 
miasm, and strong men began to suffer in health. 
Doctor Hoyt, who was on duty with the Regiment 
from the 30th of October until the 19th of November, 
writes in his diary under the latter date: "During 
the stay at Chicago, the sick list was a large one, and 
the mortality greater than at any time while in the 
service. It would be safe to state that the daily 
average sick was, 'in quarters,' sixty; in hospital, 
forty ; in addition to those in general hospital in the 
city. On the 4th of November, six Captains and ten 
Lieutenants were off duty, and this would be a fair 
average so far as officers were concerned. I attribute 



Oxe Thousand Boys ix Blue ±QQ 

this great amount of sickness to the condition of the 
camp, and the lack of proper exercise on the part 
of officers and men. The parole, also, had a demor- 
alizing influence on the men." 

It is proper to state that the kind attentions of seve- 
ral ladies in Chicago did much to mitigate the suffer- 
ing of the soldiers ; those of whom we have the names 
being Mrs. Miles, Mrs. Horatio Gf. Stone, Mrs. 
Stearns, Mrs. Hoyt, Mrs. Wheeler. 



Chapter VI 



,AMP Douglas being the residence of our troops 
for two months, and the scene of rather memor- 
able experience, merits a more extended notice. 
It lay four square, and was regularly, though roughly 
built, near Lake Michigan, between which and it ran 
a street called Cottage Grove avenue. The barracks 
surrounded hollow squares, and the different Regi- 
ments had each its own range of barracks. Those of 
the 126th were in the southwestern part of the camp, 
and with those of the 111th New York, formed the 
four sides of a square. The whole camp was large, 
containing seventy or eighty acres ; and, if properly 
drained, would not have been an unhealthy locality, 
for it was swept by all the winds of heaven. Lake 
breezes from the east and prairie winds were enough 
to purify even rebel quarters, had proper care been 
taken to remove the accumulations of filth, as well as 
to cleanse the surface of the ground with lime, before 
our troops were put there. Why the troops were 
denied the use of carts and teams, although they 
earnestly requested them, and the necessity of them 
was obvious, we know not. Our American way of 
attending to matters in the gross and neglecting details, 
was shown in many ways during the war. But we 



112 The Adventures of 

were inexperienced, and had everything to learn ; and 
we did learn a great many things before the war 
ended. 

About sixty rebels, mostly sick, occupied a portion 
of the camp. There were also other hospitals, sutlers' 
stores, guard-houses, stables, head-quarters of officers ; 
in short, everything usually found in a large encamp- 
ment. The quarters were made comfortable with coal 
fires. 

Gfeneral Daniel Tylee, who "won his spurs" at 
the first battle of Bull Run, had command of the post, 
and his head-quarters were on the side of the camp 
next the lake. (He, however, found the city a more 
pleasant and salubrious residence than his head- 
quarters. ) 

A war of extermination was declared against the 
rats, who disputed possession of the barracks (and 
especially of the cook houses) with the soldiers, and 
did not cease while the latter remained there. The 
peltry of these "small deer" would have made the 
fortune of a Parisian glove manufacturer. This inter- 
necine war had one advantage, that it furnished excit- 
ing exercise for the men, which was healthful ; for 
one cause of the sickness among the soldiers was 
undoubtedly the want of regular exercise. The line 
officers and soldiers deemed it a violation of their 
parole of honor to do any military duty whatever, 
until they should be exchanged. The terms of the 
surrender and the conditions of the parole, though 
understood at Washington, had not been communi- 
cated to the regimental commanders or line officers. 



Oxe Thousand Boys tx Blue. H3 

This culpable omission was the cause of much trouble. 
Newspapers stated and reiterated the statement that 
paroled prisoners were prohibited from doing camp or 
garrison duty 

Rebel officers, before they left Maryland, had industri- 
ously encouraged the idea among our troops that their 
capture absolved them from all obligation to the United 
States government ; and a set of lawyers in Chicago, of 
more than doubtful loyalty, did their best to foster this 
opinion among the enlisted men. Therefore, when 
orders came from Washington that the men must be 
drilled and do camp duty, there was a general feeling 
of resistance. Not that there was any objection to the 
exercise, for anything was preferable to their enforced 
indolence ; but to break a parole of honor would be 
to incur personal disgrace, and put themselves in per- 
sonal danger. However, the company officers had a 
consultation, and decided to obey the order, but under 
protest to General Tyler that by the cartel, as they 
understood It, they had no right to do military duty ; 
but having confidence that the government would not 
order them to break their parole, they would conform 
to its requirements, and do all in their power to induce 
the men to drill ; that tiny would assure the men 
that if they again fell into rebel hands the officers and 
not the enlisted men would be held responsible for 
this violation of parole, if it were one ; and therefore, 
if their officers took this risk, the men ought certainly 
to raise no objections. The men of the 126th were 
finally persuaded by such arguments, and although a 
few in Company H stood out awhile, some timely 



114 The Adventures of 

arrests, and the firm united stand taken by the line 
officers, soon brought order and submission. The feel- 
ing of the men is expressed in their letters home, 
written at the time. H. Ferguson, Sergeant in Com- 
pany F, in a letter to his father, dated October 20, 
1862, says : " Well, father, we have finally commenced 
drilling. Yon would have been amused to see our 
Regiment yesterday, when called out to drill. We 
were brought out in line, and about half the Regi- 
ment* swore they would not drill. They were imme- 
diately taken to the guard house, and kept till this 
morning, when they agreed to drill, and to-day 
the whole Regiment has been drilling. I thought, if 
our officers had no fear of drilling, why need I stand 
out ?" This military exercise was conducive to health 
in many ways. It gave the troops exercise ; it gave 
them a motive to exertion ; and, as one of them says, 
" It made us feel like soldiers again, "f The frosts, 
which set in in the latter part of October, did much 

* An over statement. 

f General Tyler sent to Washington and procured a copy of the terms 
of capitulation, which we here insert, and which, on the 26th of October, 
were communicated to the men. There is nothing in them forbidding mili- 
tary duty by the paroled troops. It is very strange that the terms were not 
made public at once. As to the cartel between General Dix, United States 
Army, and General Hill, Confederate States Army, see Rebellion Record, 
Vol. 5, Doc. 103, page 341. Article 4 is the one we supposed applied to us. 

COPY OF ARTICLES OF CAPITULATION OF HARPER'S FERRY. 

" Harper's Ferry, Va„ Sept. 15th, 1862. 
"Terms of capitulation this day entered into between Brig.-Gen'l Julius White, of the 
United States Army, commissioner on the part of the United States, and Maj.-Gen'l 
A. P. Hill, of the Confederate States Army, commissioner upon the part of the Con- 
federate States : 
" I. The garrison of Harper's Ferry, including all the troops at present under command 
of Col. D. S. Miles, with all munitions of war, will be surrendered to Maj.-Gen. A. P.Hill, 
commissioner appointed by Major-Gen'l Jackson, of the Confederate States Army. The 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 115 

for the health of the camp, by fettling the miasma,, 
and by November there was a decided improvement in 
the appearance of the men. 

But to go back a little. The situation of the 126th 
at Chicago, in the first part of their stay there, was 
in no respect more trying than in having to bear the 
imputation of cowardice on Maryland Heights. Every 
newspaper they saw libelled and slandered them, and 
screened their superior officers. They knew that no 
Eegiment did its duty better there, or suffered more 
than theirs. To quote from a letter written by Lieu- 
tenant Lincoln at the time: "It is plain that our 
Regiment did all that was required of it, and in a 
perfectly satisfactory manner, for there were several 
Regiments who had had a year's experience in war, 
and yet we, a green Regiment, who had only had 
our guns a few days, were taken across the river and 
put in the advance, where fighting was thickest and 
the position most important. We found no fault with, 
this, for we were ready and willing to do anything 
required of us ; but after doing it, and doing it well, . 
to be robbed of the credit of it by slanderous reports; 

officers and men to be paroled not to serve against the Confederate States until regularly- 
exchanged. The officers to be allowed to retain their side arms and personal property. 

" II. It is also agreed, upon the part of the two commissioners, that these terms of sur- 
render do not include those soldiers of the Confederate States who, having been regularly 
enlisted in the service of the Confederate States, have deserted the same and taken service 

in the United States Army. 

" A. P. HILL, Maj.-GenH, C. S. A. 

" JULIUS WHITE, Brig.-Gen'l, U. S. V. 

" Brig.-Gen'l White proposed the following, which is not admitted, viz : Provided that 
no person shall be considered a deserter whose prior service against the United States has. 
been compulsory. Brig.-Gen'l White therefore protests, in the name of the United States,, 
against any construction of the terms of this capitulation, other than as proposed by him~ 

" A. P. HILL, Maj.-Gen'l, C. S. A. 
"JULIUS WHITE, Brig.-GeiCl, U.S. K" 
8 



116 The Adventures of 

circulated by Regiments (and officers) who had not 
courage to do their duty in time of danger, seems to 
xis unjust and unreasonable. There may have been 
individual instances of cowardice, but that any consi- 
derable portion of the Regiment behaved disgracefully 
is utterly false. Captain Phillips discharged his 
duty satisfactorily to all. Always cool and ready for 
any emergency, he is peculiarly fitted for command," 
etc. These false reports had preceded the Regiment 
to Chicago. The Fair grounds, near Camp Douglas, 
were a rendezvous for volunteers, and many Illinois 
recruits were gathered there. When these recruits 
taunted our men with the epithet, "Harper's Ferry 
cowards !" it was more than flesh and blood could 
bear. They took the redress of their wrongs into 
their own hands, hands which had strong sinews and 
hard knuckles, as the taunting Illinois boys found to 
their cost, and soon taught them better manners. The 
Illinoisians complained to General Tyler, who, on 
learning the facts, dismissed the complaint, and jus- 
tified the New York men. But the Illinois boys 
revenged themselves by circulating in their own State 
the report that the 126th were disorderly and quarrel- 
some, a report which spread far beyond Chicago. 
We have carefully examined the diaries and letters 
describing camp life at Chicago, and find no evidence 
of lawlessness on the part of 'the 126th, except this 
rough handling of those who insulted them. The con- 
trary is shown by the fact, which can be proved by 
the regimental order books, that the 126th was con- 
stantly called out to patrol the city, gather stragglers 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 117 

from the camp, and to guard those under arrest for 
mutiny and disorder. We have before us a letter 
dated Chicago, October 25, 1862, and marked "confi- 
dential," addressed to Lieutenant-Colonel Bull, of 
which the following is a copy : 

Sie : I have detailed the 60th Ohio Volunteers to do guard 
duty to-morrow, but have great doubts whether they will turn 
out, though they may, as it is their turn. Will you hold your 
Regiment in readiness to take their place if they should fail. I 
write this by direction of General Tylee. 

Yours very truly, 

FRANK J. BOND, 

A. A. A. a. 

This shows the confidence that was placed in the 
126th by the superior officer. We have also the con- 
solidated daily morning reports of the 126th, and find 
under the head of arrests and confinements from Sep- 
tember 29th to October 14th, but six arrests reported 
in the 126th. After this came the disturbance about 
drilling, and on one day twenty-nine are reported as 
arrested or in confinement, but on the following day 
only six. 

But it has been said that many of the paroled pri- 
soners deserted while in Chicago. It is true that 
many men went home,* and among them several from 
the 126th, but not with the intention to desert, as was 
proved by the fact that most of these so-called 
deserters returned to their Regiments after they had 
been exchanged. In fact, when we read the accounts 

* It was the mistaken idea that the parole forbade their drilling, more 
than the unhealthincss of the camp, that made many go home. 



118 The Adventures of 

of the sickness which prevailed in camp, the wonder 
is, not that several left, but that so many stayed 
there to fall victims to it.* Most of our men, how- 
ever, felt like Sergeant Ferguson, who wrote : " You 
need not expect me home until I can come honorably, 
and not afraid to look a man in the face." So they 
stayed, and many never left, for they sickened and 
died there. In the consolidated morning reports we 
find that on the 19th of October, 180 (officers and pri- 
vates) are reported as sick in the 126th alone. 

During the three weeks that the men were idle in 
camp, they resorted to various amusements to keep 
up health and spirits, playing ball, sparring with 
gloves, pitching quoits, jumping and wrestling, and 
dancing in the evenings. The 126th entered much 
more into such amusements than their neighbors, the 
111th, and in consequence suffered much less from dis- 
ease. Another exercise was putting out fires. Incen- 
diarism was rife among the Illinois and Ohio troops, 
who thought it fun to burn barracks, regardless of 
consequences. Night after night the New York troops 
packed their things, and had guards posted to watch 
for fires. We find by the "order book" that 
detachments of the 126th were often detailed to watch 
for and arrest incendiaries. The old Regiments, espe- 
cially the western ones, were also constantly tearing 
down the fence that surrounded the camp, rendering 
it easier to stray to the city (a forbidden privilege). 
"They pulled down most of the high board fence 
around the camp-grounds, and 200 men were detailed 

* Dr. Peltier remembers prescribing for 500 patients in one day. 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 119 

to put it up again." No sooner was it up, than the 
lawless rowdies tore it down again, split up the boards 
and set the barracks on fire, which burned thirty rods 
of them before the engines from the city could come 
to put them out. One entry in a Sergeant's diary 
says : "Our Regiment received orders to-night for all 
to stand guard." This looks as if they were confided 
in. Indeed there is much evidence that by their clean- 
liness, and obedience to orders, they were gaining the 
favor of their officers. General Tyler noticed the 
New York camps, and complimented them ; and a 
pass to visit the city was scarcely required by one of 
the 126th. But to receive peculiar favors from officers 
is not a way to make a Kegiment popular with the 
insubordinate. We mentioned, page 103, that some 
of the older troops liked to indulge in what they 
called "cleaning out a sutler," and explained what 
this term meant. Two or three sutlers had opened 
stores in camp, but the Ohio troops had made raids 
on them and "cleaned them out." But when one 
who had established his store between the 126th New 
York and the 60th Ohio was attacked, the officers of 
the 126th ran, armed, to his rescue, but in their turn 
were attacked with clubs and brickbats, most of which 
passed over their heads and hit the rioters on the 
other side. The sutler was saved, but the rioters 
vowed vengeance against those 1 ! who aided him, and 
swore to burn out the New York troops, obliging the 
latter to keep a constant watch against fires. In spite 
of all vigilance, a great many rods of barracks were 
burned down. 



120 The Adventures of One Thousand Boys in Blue. 

The few relbels who had been left in barracks died 
or got well and were removed before the middle of 
October. But the same culpable negligence which 
marked the conduct of the authorities toward our own 
troops, was shown in their neglect of the bodies of 
the dead in the rebel barracks. In some instances 
they were left in these rat-infested places without 
burial. The consequences were too horrible for detail. 
Such things prove a most unpardonable remissness 
somewliere. 

A very strong effort was made by the officers of the 
paroled troops to have them removed from their 
almost deadly quarters at Camp Douglas, to some 
more salubrious spot. Surgeon Hammond visited 
Washington and Albany for the purpose, and had 
personal interviews with the Secretary of "War and 
Governor Morgan, and actually obtained an order for 
their removal to New York State; but for some cause 
or other, this order was revoked. Perhaps some con- 
tractor in Chicago who was making "a good thing" 
of having the troops there, was answerable for this ; it 
is just possible that political motives were at work 
(New York Regiments were voters when in their own 
State) ; whatever the cause, no change was made, and 
the poor boys in blue continued to sicken and some 
of them to drop into unhonored graves in Camp 
Douglas. 



p 



HAPTEN I ^ ' 



\~N the 19th of November, notice was received of 
the exchange of the New York troops, paroled 
at Harper s Ferry, who were to proceed to Wash- 
ington, and be armed and put on duty The joyful 
news was carried about the camp in advance of the 
official promulgation of the order, and barrack after 
barrack became jubilant with cheers and mutual con- 
gratulations. Clothing, canteens, knapsacks and haver- 
sacks were drawn, and all was cheerful activity. On 
the 23d, orders were received to start on the 24th, at 
three p. m., by railroad, and in passenger cars, with four 
days rations, and coffee in canteens. When they were 
carried to Chicago it was in freight cars. A silent 
inference was drawn that the government now regarded 
them as men; and they received the announcement 
with lusty cheers. At dross parade that evening, when 
the order was to be read officially by the Adjutant,, 
each man came out in his best array Many of the 
sick appeared with them, their lank, jaundiced faces 
lighted up with pleasure ; and three times three were 
given with a will. They were going to the front ; to 
fight the enemies of their country ; to redeem their 
names from disgrace. The hated Camp Douglas was to 
be left forever ! Small reason had they to regret 



122 The Adventures of 

leaving it. They went there strong, active, vigorous 
young men ; they found there filth, vermin, and a 
noisome atmosphere, that brought fever, jaundice and 
diarrhoea, which laid strong men on their beds of 
suffering, from which some never rose again. Many, 
too sick to be removed, had to see their comrades go 
and leave them behind. More than one hundred of 
this one Regiment were thus left. 

The troops left Chicago at three and a half in the 
afternoon. At Toledo hot coffee was furnished by the 
railroad company At midnight they reached Pitts- 
burg, two months from the time of passing through 
there before. As usual, all are cordial in praise of 
Pittsburg, where they were bountifully supplied with 
every comfort ; not as if from a sense of duty, but as 
if from love to Union soldiers and the Union cause. 
The bands played, glee clubs sang, the Chaplain made 
a speech. No complaints, even from attendants, of the 
unseasonableness of the hour, or the difficulty of feed- 
ing so many. All felt themselves welcome; and this 
was the glorious testimony to Pittsburg throughout 
the war. 

Pittsburg was left before daylight, and the cars 
wound their way up the tunneled mountain ridges of 
Pennsylvania to their wintry summits ; thence into the 
genial valley of the Susquehanna, and so on to Balti- 
more, where a Thanksgiving dinner was furnished 
them at the Union Rooms. A Thanksgiving, indeed, 
to these freed prisoners ! The loyal people of Balti- 
more were truly loyal and liberal ; but the soldiers 
say: "There is only one Pittsburg!" 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 123 

In Washington the troops spent the morning visiting 
public buildings, which seemed magnificent, although, 
as a whole, the city disappointed them. One says : 
" It was more of a shabby country place than I 
expected to see." (In fact, the city has disappointed 
many besides these soldiers. Great outlay of money 
on public buildings and their grounds, and little out- 
lay on anything else, makes a shabby town. Poorly 
paved, or unpaved, streets, sprawling muddy or dusty 
avenues, mean shops and poor boarding houses, spoil 
a city which, from its situation and the amount of 
money spent upon it, might be the finest on the con- 
tinent.) 

The Regiment was assigned to Casey's Division, 
22d Corps (Heintzelman' s), and was ordered to Camp 
Chase, on Arlington Heights. There they found the 
125th, who had preceded them a day or two, and who 
furnished them coffee and food, thus returning the 
hospitality which the 126th showed them at Harper's 
Ferry, when they came in tired and hungry from 
Shepardstown. No fuel, except twigs and sticks, could 
be found ; the night was cold ; rolled in their one 
blanket apiece, with mother earth for bed and the 
clouds for coverlet, they tried to forget their troubles 
in sleep.* 

November 29, they drew tents and pitched them, 
and had calls from acquaintances from the north. 

* While at. Arlington Heights, Lieutenant Baeras was dismissed from the 
service for being absent from his post without leave, and for drunkenness. 
Major Phillips had before preferred charges against him for cowardice on 
Mainland Heights, for drunkenness, and for conduct unbecoming an officer 
and a gentleman. 



124 The Adventures of 

November 30, the Chaplain preached, and at evening 
there was dress parade. Here Major Baibd was duly 
notified of his dismissal from service, and Captain 
Phillips was appointed acting Major of the Regiment, 
which here received its new colors. On the 2d 
December the men received arms and accoutrements, 
and were ordered to Union Mills, to do picket duty 
along Bull Run, on the outer defenses of Washington. 
On the 3d they were marched to Alexandria, where 
they saw vast numbers of "contrabands," and whence 
they went by rail to Union Mills. They climbed a 
long steep hill ; built huge fires of logs ; and, their 
tents not having arrived, slept on the ground near the 
fires. Next day wall tents arrive for the officers and 
"A" tents for the enlisted men ; and, there being no 
teams, the men carry them up the hill on their should- 
ers. Before half the tents are up, night comes on, and 
many sleep again on the ground, unsheltered. Decem- 
ber 5th, another move. The men are ordered to a low 
hill east of their first camp, where they pitch their 
tents in a heavy snow storm. The snow melts as it 
falls, and the men work in the mud and slop. There 
are no means of warming the tents, but ditches are 
dug around to drain them. On a little straw spread 
upon the soaked and " sticky "' soil of the " Old 
Dominion," the men seek rest. Fortunately, they had 
brought from Chicago some bedding, sent by friends 
at home, or their sufferings would have been extreme. 
One Sergeant says : "It makes a fellow think of 
home, to sleep on the ground these frosty nights ; 
but we have to come to it." We have dwelt on 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 125 

these points to show those who know little of the pri- 
vations and hardships of a soldier's life that it is not 
all what a colored woman called " brass buttons and 
glory." A little glory is purchased by a vast amount 
of hard toil, sleepless or restless nights, and dreary 
days. Still further, to illustrate this, we will make an 
abstract of a page of Lieutenant Richardson' s diary : 
December and January, cloudy, cold and raw, were 
sickly months for us. The unhealthy camp at Chicago 
had sown the seeds of disease, that now developed 
themselves to an alarming extent. Small-pox, measles 
and mumps prevailed among all the Regiments here, 
and many deaths followed ; but the measles was more 
fatal than any other malady, for it left its victim in so 
weakened a condition that, generally, pneumonia super- 
vened and proved fatal. Such a case was that of W 
T. Lamport, son of W H. Lamport, of Canandaigua, 
who died of measles and pneumonia combined ; and 
his sorrowing comrades, while conveying his remains 
to a point whence they could be shipped home, met 
the father just coming to visit his son ! Few fathers 
are called to part with such a son. Manly and intel- 
ligent, he enlisted from patriotism ; and his parents, 
from like motives, gave him to their country ; and the 
sacrifice was sealed by his death, at the early age of 
eighteen.* 

* Without his consent, we copy from Lieutenant Richardson's diary 
another short passage, -which tells its own story : 

Journal— T>w. 6. " I got my tent up, and a sheet iron stove I hrought 
from Arlington Heights. Also got a tick filled with straw, and anticipated 
a good night's rest; but by night I had several men sick, among them 
W T. L. I went to the surgeons, but they had no accommodations for the 



126 The Adventures of One Thousand Boys in Blue. 

sick. I then got a large supply of wood cut for my stove, placed young L. 
and another in my bunk on my bed ; then spread blankets under the bunk, 
and placed two more sick there, and fixed a little place on the floor in front 
for myself; but found that my servant (a genuine Uncle Tom, about forty- 
five years old), whom I had kept hard at work all the time, in the storm, 
was sick, so gave him the place I had reserved for myself ; sat up on the 
woodpile, made tea for the sick, and dozed away the night. In the morning 
I took L. to the hospital tent," &c, &c. 



p 



HAPTEN X 



JT^DNION" MILLS is so named from flouring mills 
^gybrmerly worked there ; Bull run furnishing the 
< §3> water power. "It is, in fact, no place at all ;" 
there being but three houses at the station, and some 
farm-houses scattered about the country The Orange 
and Alexandria railroad crosses Bull run, near the 
mills, on a trestle- bridge, which was frequently 
destroyed by rebels and rebuilt by our armies; and 
was in a dilapidated state when our troops were there. 
There were a good many earthworks on the hills 
around, which were erected by Beauregakd ; and, with 
their famous guns, did good service for the rebels by 
checking McClellan's advance one whole winter. Here 
our men found a good many barracks, built of logs, 
and pretty comfortable, which had been occupied by 
the rebels in the winter of '61-2. Across the run, the 
men found scattered fragments of lace and crinoline, 
and broken bottles and hampers, which told of luxury 
the preceding winter, and also that female society had 
enlivened the rebel camp. It lies southwest of Wash- 
ington, twenty-three miles from Alexandria, and three 
or four miles from Centreville. The battle-fields here 
have one feature of frightful interest, viz., the unburied 
or half buried skeletons of horses and men everywhere 



128 The Adventures of 

to be seen. In some instances the head and feet, in 
others the hands, or, sometimes, a single upraised 
finger were visible. Sometimes a ghastly skeleton sat, 
propped against a tree, just where he died. "Unwept, 
unhonored and unsung," without even a coffin to pro- 
tect their poor remains from insult and violence, here 
lay the hope of many a proud house ; the joy of 
many a fond mother ! 

Bull run is a small stream, easily swelled by 
rains, and crossed by several fords. One of these, 
Blackburn's, was the scene of General Tylee's feat 
(and defeat) at the first Bull run battle, when, fancy- 
ing that the enemy would run if seriously menaced, 
he commenced firing at them across a stream, — thus 
developing our situation and disconcerting General 
McDowell' s plans ; a mile above this is Mitchell' s 
ford, and four miles farther, on the turnpike from 
Centreville to Warrenton, is the famous "stone 
bridge," where the storm of battle raged so fiercely 
on the fatal 21st of July, 1861. Going down the run 
from Union Mills there are other fords, the last of 
which is Woody ard ford, just before the stream unites 
with the Occoquan at Wolf run shoals. Thorough- 
fare Gap and Manassas Gap are both in view from 
the heights around the mills. The country had been 
thickly wooded, but savage work had been done 
among the trees by both armies to obtain fuel and 
timber. Heavy slashings were numerous in front of 
forts and rifle-pits. The soil is poor, but abounds in 
springs and "runs" of water. Captain Wheeler 
says: "One near our camp rejoices in the name of 



Oa'e Thousand Boys in Blue. 129 

Johnny run." Bull run is a tortuous stream, finding 
its way among ravines, hills, and huge rocks ; render- 
ing the labors of the picket-guard stationed along its 
course exceedingly severe. The men detailed as 
pickets were obliged to be out from twenty-four to 
forty-eight hours in cold, wet or snow T , without tents, 
and often without fires. Marching back and forth 
between the stations, the more distant of which were 
from four to eight miles from camp, their tedious 
watch was rarely broken by an adventure, yet must 
never be intermitted. Captain Wheeler writes, under 
date of December 7th: "Laid out our picket line 
from Union Mills to Blackburn' s ford ; remained out 
twenty-four hours. After this, our line was from 
Union Mills to Woodyard's ford, and we were out 
forty-eight hours. * * It looked very gloomy, 
wading through the snow out through an unknown 
place to unknown danger ; but, after a while, it was 
looked at merely as our business, and preferred by 
the men to camp guard." Not much respect had 
these pickets for the "sacred soil" of Yirginia, 
"which," says Lieutenant Seamans, "we used to 
scrape from our boots in disgust." Such exposure, 
after their Chicago experience, would naturally bring- 
on disease ; and pneumonia, and typhoid soon claimed 
many victims. 

On the 10th of December Colonel Sherrill, his 
wound nearly healed, appeared in camp, and was 
greeted with the warmest enthusiasm. 

Dec 11. — Th<* monotony of camp life was broken by 
an odd exploit of Colonel iVUtassy, of the 39th New 



130 The Adventures of 

York, commanding the Brigade, who seems to have 
had a genius fertile in invention. Wishing to recon- 
noitre the railroad toward Manassas, he determined to 
send a railway train for the purpose, which was made 
up of, first a car made of boiler iron with port holes 
on all sides, furnished with a piece of artillery and 
plenty of shell ; then the engine, and then platform 
and box cars. Captain Aikins and Lieutenant Rich- 
aedsojst, with forty men were detailed to accompany 
the expedition. Colonel d'UTAssY, a detail from the 
artillery to serve the gun, some pioneers, a telegraph 
operator with a portable battery, and the infantry, set 
forth in the afternoon and proceeded to Bristoe station, 
taking observations on the way, but at Bristoe found 
the track so encumbered with the ruins of cars and 
property destroyed in the raid on General Pope the 
August before, that they could not proceed, but 
returned to camp at eleven o'clock in the evening. 
No good was done by this - singular reconnoissance, 
nor, as it happened, any harm ; but had they met the 
enemy or roving bands of guerrillas, the little Hunga- 
rian Colonel, might have wished himself and his 
unwieldy apparatus back within our lines. 

Dec. 12. — Another adventure. The Regiment had 
orders to join General Sigel and part of his Corps 
on the way to Fredericksburg. Accordingly they set 
forth on a terribly muddy road, reached Fairfax sta- 
tion, built fires and prepared to be comfortable, when, 
at eleven at night, came an order for all to march 
back again except two Companies, C and K, who were 
left to do provost duty at Fairfax. Rather hard 



One Thousand Boys in Blue 131 

marching along the railroad track in the night, cross- 
ing bridges on the ' ' stringers, ' ' but they reached 
camp again at daybreak. While at Fairfax, a tele- 
gram came from the War Department for Gfeneral 
Si gel, and Colonel Bull sent Sergeants Wheat' 
and Copp, of the 126th, on cavalry horses, to over- 
take him and deliver it, which they did, but return- 
ing, were set upon by guerrillas at night, lost their 
horses and themselves barely escaped capture. 

The reason that picket duty was excessively severe 
while the army lay at Unipn Mills, was not only the 
length of the picket line, the coldness and wet of the 
weather, and the rough nature of the country, but 
that there were so few able bodied men fit for the 
work. The 151st Pennsylvania, of 800 men ; the 39th 
New York, 400 ; and the 126th, between 600 and 700, 
performed the service mostly ; but as many were sick, 
and- many on extra or daily duty, it left so few to 
picket and protect the long line, that the men were 
obliged to go on every other day. And a day meant 
twenty-four hours. 

The usual routine of a soldier's life while at Union 
Mills was : 1st. Rise at reveille, dress and take his- 
place in the street of his Company to answer to roll 
call. 2d. Prepare for breakfast. This preparation' 
consisted of putting one or two day's rations in his 
haversack, according as to whether he was to remain 
on picket one or two days ; packing knapsack, roll- 
ing blanket and strapping it neatly to knapsack,, 
cleaning his gun thoroughly, blacking shoes and belts,, 
brushing clothes and burnishing buttons and brass 
9 



1-32 The Adventures of 

plates. 3d. Breakfast ; after which guard-mounting 
and dividing the troops into detachments for picket 
duty, and sending the pickets to their posts and sta- 
tions, where they relieve those who have preceded 
them, and get instructions from them. 

The most important object of the picket line was to 
prevent any communication which evil disposed per- 
sons might try to carry on between rebel Virginia 
and Washington. Another object was to guard against 
attacks. Sentinels stood within hearing of each other 
along Bull Run, with the strictest orders to let no one 
pass or repass unless sent by the General command- 
ing. In the rear of this line was another, where two 
sentinels were posted together, at longer intervals, to 
assist the front line in case of emergency ; and in the 
rear of this, there was still a reserve force to be called 
on in case of attack or difficulty Each sentinel 
remained on guard two hours, and was then relieved 
by one, and then a second, from those in the rear, so 
that he was strictly on the watch one-third of the time 
that he was on picket ; and must observe and care- 
fully report everything by signals previously agreed 
upon. At the reserve posts, bough houses were built, 
which were sometimes warmed by tires, and so were 
often quite comfortable. 

In order to reach his post, or beat, the picket often 
had to travel five, and even seven or eight miles 
and then commence his two hour watch. Then, when 
relieved, he went to the rear, warmed and dried him- 
self, boiled his coffee in his pint cup, toasted his meat 
on a forked stick, and managed his hard crackers as 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 133 

"best he could. (This was not luxurious living, but 
fatigue and hunger gave it a relish which many a 
sluggard at home might sigh for in vain.) Then he 
might rest two or three hours, and then he must take 
another turn at the front. When the twenty-four or 
forty-eight hours for which he was out expired, he 
marched back to camp, washed, dressed, cleaned gun 
and accoutrements, and had dinner, after which came 
writing letters, washing clothes, cutting wood, and the 
inevitable drill ; then everything must be made nice 
and presentable for a dress parade at sunset. The 
precision and dexterity required at dress parade can 
only be attained by months of study and careful 
practice ; but when the details are all mastered, and 
the discipline is perfected, nothing can be more beau- 
tiful than the military evolutions of a large body of 
men, all seemingly actuated by the same will.* 

After dress parade, supper ; then news, gossip, 
reading and letter writing, and at "tattoo" all must 
prepare for bed, by placing clothes, arms, everything, 
where they can be seized and put on at a minutes' 
warning. Then came "taps,'' when lights must be 
put out, and silence reign in camp, until, if no night 
disturbance happens, "reveille" calls all from bed to 
their various duties once more. Such is soldier-life in 

* What a picket's duty was may be illustrated by an extract taken at 
random from G. Ikvtno Rosk's diary : " January 27th — On picket. 2!»th — 
Relieved. :»lst— On Brigade guard. February 1st — Relieved. 2d — On 
camp guard. M — Relieved. 4th — On picket at Blackburne ford. 5th — 
Relieved. 7th— On Brigade guard. Klh— Relieved. 10th— On picket." 
And so on. This extract shows how often the poor fellows were called to 
this twenty-four or forty-eight hours service. At another time he records : 
" Cold, and a foot of snow." And again : " Snow melts, and deep mud." 



134 The Adventures of 

camp. With regard to the camp itself, we will say a 
few words, although it is a little out of place. A 
camp is usually laid out in streets, like a village ; and 
in a Regiment of ten Companies there will be ten 
streets, with twenty rows of tents, beside those of the 
company, staff and field officers. A guard is daily 
posted round the camp, commanded by a Lieutenant, 
called officer of the guard, and over him is a Captain, 
called officer of the day, whose duty lasts twenty-four 
hours, and who is responsible for the neatness, good 
order and quiet of the camp. The men are ordered 
to their posts and duties by drum and bugle calls, 
which they learn to distinguish and understand. (In 
a cavalry Regiment the horses learn the calls, and 
obey them readily. ) The ' ' streets ' ' are kept tidy by 
sweeping. Not a scrap of paper or "whittling" must 
be seen by the inspector. 

Between the 24th and 30th of December occurred 
one of the rebel Stuart's famous "raids," so disas- 
trous to us, and carrying such comfort to the half-fed 
confederates. He was absent from Richmond several 
days, burned a number of bridges on the Alexandria 
railroad, and captured or destroyed large quantities 
of national stores. With a large cavalry force, cross- 
ing to Falmouth, on the Rappahannock, he got to 
the rear of the army of the Potomac, whereupon the 
cavalry of that army moved round to the west, threat- 
ening him. On this, Stuart with his "merry men" 
dashed through the outer lines of the defenses of 
Washington, and passing between the capital and 
Fairfax station, where large quantities of military 



Oxe Thousand Boys in Blue. 135 

stores and forage were collected, attacked the sta- 
tion ; but meeting a stubborn opposition he hurried 
northward, and, finding a telegraph station, sent some 
saucy messages to the war department at Washing- 
ton ; broke through the lines again, and got back to 
the Rappahannock with his plunder. On learning the 
advance of Stuakt, the fords were immediately 
guarded by detachments of the 126th New York, and 
151st Pennsylvania. These detachments marched on 
the double quick, and were halted on a commanding 
ridge, between Woodyard ford and Fairfax station, 
to watch for the enemy The night was clear and 
bitter cold. The men, heated with their march, had 
no blankets and must build no fires. Their suffering 
was extreme, nor were they rewarded by even a sight 
of the nimble-footed enemy Slocum's (12th) Corps 
were also out on Stuakt' s track, and part of the 
126th were watching for him at Union Mills and at 
Centreville, but "his foot was on his native heath;" 
he knew every gorge and defile of the mountains, 
while our boys were in a strange land. This was the 
secret of the success of many rebel raids. 

Feb. 27. — A detachment of Pennsylvania Reserves, 
temporarily attached to the Brigade, and encamped 
near it, became fractious and refused to do duty, 
whereupon General Hays called out the 126th, and 
ordered them to disarm the insubordinates, who were 
condemned to fatigue duty in the rifle-pits ; the 126th 
standing guard over them while they worked. This 
soon brought them to terms ; but the incident was 



136 The Adventures of 

pleasant to our boys, showing them the confidence 
placed in them by superior officers. 

On the 8th of March, Brigadier- General Stoughton 
was kidnapped by the guerrilla, Mosebt, in an exceed- 
ingly dextrous manner. The General's whereabouts 
were betrayed by a Miss Ford, the famous rebel spy, 
who carried with her a pass commanding all the con- 
federates "to obey, honor and admire her." Moseby 
got within the lines of pickets near Fairfax Court- 
house by stationing one of his own men as a sentinel 
between two of our pickets, where he learned the 
countersign from the patrol. He thus got in with 
twenty-nine men, went, as he says, to Fairfax village, 
rode right up to the General's quarters, took him out 
of bed and brought him off. He says : "I walked 
into his room, and, shaking him in his bed, said, 
'General, get up.' He said, 'What does this mean?' 
I said, 'It means Stuart's cavalry are in possession 
of this place, and you are a prisoner.' " The guards 
were kept silent by a pistol pointed at their heads. 
Moseby claims that at the same time he got thirty 
other officers and privates, and fifty-eight horses.* 

On the 24th of March the Brigade was ordered to 
Centerville, so called from the main thoroughfares of 
travel centering in it. It lies only four miles from 
Union Mills ; was a thriving place before the war, 
but desolate enough as our army found it. "Farms 
once worth their thousands, now a mere common ; 
houses and barns pulled down ; fields and gardens 
dug up into rifle-pits and redoubts ; everything laid 

* See Moseby's report. 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 137 

waste. One can now stand on the commanding ridge 
where the forts are, which forts are connected by 
trenches or rifle-pits so deep a Regiment can he 
marched through them with their heads even with the 
surface of the ground, and look away across the 
bloody plains of Manassas to the Bull Run Mountains, 
and over them to the Blue Ridge, which rises in 
majestic grandeur high over all. Thoroughfare Gap 
and Manassas Gap, already historic, are in full view ; 
and Loudon Heights can be seen with distinctness. 
This has been nature's paradise almost, but now it is 
nature' s common on which have been ' let loose the 
dogs of war.' "* 

Doctor Hoyt mentions another splendid estate north 
of Centerville, of over 1,000 acres, and a noble though 
antiquated mansion, owned by Lewis Machin, for 
many years clerk of the United States senate, and 
still firm in his adherence to the government, although 
two of his sons joined the rebel army At the first 
Bull Run battle, Mr. Machin with his family occu- 
pied the mansion, witnessed the fight, and threw open 
his doors for the reception of wounded Union soldiers. 
When our forces fell back upon Washington the rebels 
occupied his farm, and, to escape them, he sought 
safety within our lines. When Doctor Hoyt saw the 
place, April '63, it was occupied by colored persons, 



*" Last Saturday we took horses and rode over the old Chantilly battle- 
ground. You will remember that the one-armed old war horse, General 
Kearney, was killed in that fight. We saw the spot. The Chantilly estate 
is one of the finest places I ever set eyes on ; 1,300 acres in the farm. The 
mansion has been burned, and the fences in places riddled with bullets." 
—[Lieutenant Lincoln's letter.] 



138 The Adventures of 

who were vigilant in guarding the property Mr. 
Machltst, with part of his family, was in Baltimore. 
His library, one of the finest in the State, he was for- 
tunate enough to save. 

Doctor Hoyt writes, under date of March 24: "This 
morning the Regiment left for Centerville. Vermont 
troops to supply our place at Union Mills. Arrived 
at Centerville at two p. m., and immediately set to 
work arranging a new camp. All the stores, lumber 
and other camp equipage are to be brought from Union 
Mills. We find the 39th, 111th, and 125th New York 
Volunteers encamped here, our Regiment being placed 
on the extreme right of the line. The seriously sick 
were left at Brigade hospital, and a new Brigade 
hospital is being arranged here prior to their removal 
hither. 

Of their camp, when arranged, Lieutenant Lincoln 
says, May 18 : "I speak upon the authority of Gfene- 
xal Abercrombie, who has been in the service forty 
years, when I say it is probably the nicest camp in 
the whole army. I can't begin to tell you one-half its 
beauty Arches and all kinds of ingenious devices 
decorate almost every street and corner. You can 
hardly see a tent, the evergreens are so thick." 
Pretty well for boys who were out on picket or guard 
duty from two to four nights in a week. 

The beauty and order of the camp attracted numer- 
ous visitors, among whom were many ladies, gene- 
rally the wives of officers. No pains were spared by 
General A. Hats, who had been in command of the 
Brigade since January, to make their stay with the 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 139 

army agreeable. A deserted rebel mansion, near the 
camp, was fitted up for the reception of guests ; and 
here Mrs. Hats often entertained large evening parties 
of ladies and officers. Here, like the revelers on the 
eve of "Waterloo, 1 ' they often "chased the glowing 
hours with flying feet," good music being furnished 
by the regimental bands. Horseback excursions to 
various points of interest in the neighborhood gave 
additional zest and variety to life in camp. 

Great attention was paid to the various forms of 
military discipline. The men were drilled several 
hours a day Every diary, as well as their letters, 
record the praise bestowed upon subordinate officers 
and men by superior officers for their perfection in 
military evolutions, and for their faithfulness in picket 
and guard duties. It was the boast of the 126th that 
neither Stuakt, Moseby, or any other raider, ever got 
through their picket lines. Dr. Hoyt says, April 2d : 
"The Brigade is under constant drill, and fast being 
educated in the school of the soldier. The Regiment 
is in fine condition and most excellent spirits. Very 
few sick. 1 ' Extract from an anonymous letter from 
one of the 126th Regiment, dated April 12, 1863: "I 
would not be at home for the wealth of the Empire 
State. It would kill me ! And this is the spirit of 
the army. If we fail to sustain the cause of our 
government, the hope of constitutional liberty through- 
out the world goes down, and I never wish to see 
that. But, mother, we will not fail. In the course of 
time the arni}' will come home ; and, whether I am 
alive or dead, .you will be proud to say that your son 



140 The Adventures of 

did not stay at home, nor prove recreant in the hour 
of his country' s peril ; but stood up for the flag. 
This country (Centreville) is full of beautiful springs 
and running streams. If it were not for war's deso- 
lations it would be a beautiful country." 

Every day, almost, there were rumors either of a 
contemplated advance of the Brigade or of the 
approach of the enemy We constantly meet, in the 
diaries, such entries as this : ' ' This morning, at an 
early hour, orders were received for the Brigade to 
hold itself in readiness to move at a moment's notice. 
The rumor is that the entire 22d Army Corps is to 
leave the defenses of Washington, and join the Army 
of the Potomac." "The whole Brigade called out at 
four a. m., and in line, under arms, to guard against 
any surprise. Picket lines strengthened," etc., etc. 

The constant arrival in the Union camps of refugees 
from rebeldom, in a most deplorable condition, is 
mentioned in many diaries. At first all were admitted 
and their wants supplied, and the tide of fugitives set 
in strongly and steadily toward our lines. But at 
length it was found that while many were worthy of 
commiseration and relief, many more were spies, 
adventurers and dealers in contraband articles, who, 
after getting inside our lines, would reach Washing- 
ton, and then, from their knowledge of the country, 
elude the vigilance of the pickets, and get back to 
the confederacy with valuable supplies and informa- 
tion. The most stringent orders, therefore, were sent 
from Washington forbidding any refugees to pass our 
picket lines on any pretense whatever. Touched with 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 141 

their forlorn condition, fleeing from an impoverished 
confederacy, and now homeless and starving, the 
pickets often shared their rations with them, and 
General Hays repeatedly sent wagon loads of provi- 
sions and medicines ontside of our pickets to the 
hovels where these poor creatures would congregate, 
sometimes ten or fifteen in a hovel. This was a relief ; 
but after all, the suffering must have been extreme, 
and constituted no inconsiderable part of the wretch- 
edness brought upon the southerners by the insane 
and wicked leaders of the rebellion. And it will be 
remembered that this was not confined to Centreville 
nor to Virginia ; wherever a Union camp was estab- 
lished, there was the same dreadful experience. 

The following extracts from Dr. Hoyt's diary will 
be of interest : 

April 21st. — Brigade reviewed to-day by General Hays. 
Order of Brigade: Right, 125th New York Volunteers; left, 
126th; right center, 111th New York Volunteers; left center, 
39th* ; right Battery, Keystone ; left, 9th Massachusetts ; day 
pleasant ; affair passed off creditably. 22d. — General Abercrom- 
bie, superseding General Casey, took command of the Division 
in the field.f May 3d. — The battle of Chancellorsville is being 
fought, and we distinctly hear the heavy guns at this place. 8th. — 
During the progress of the battle the Division has been in com- 
plete readiness to move at a moment's notice. 12th. — For six or 
eight days the Brigade has been engaged digging rifle-pits and 
throwing up earthworks on our front as protection against attack. 

* It is interesting to note that the 126th, 125th, 111th and 39th New York 
Regiments were companions throughout almost the entire war. 

\ Extract from Captain Wiikki.er's diary : " I wish to record here a con- 
versation which took place on the 13th, at the review, between General 
Abercrombie and General Hays, who were inspecting the Regiment. 
General A. : ' The Regiment seems to be very uniform.' General H. : ' You 
will always find them all right, and, besides, they have a good record; they 
are the Regiment who did the fighting at Harper's Ferry.' " 



142 The Adventures of One Thousand Boys in Blue. 

But we must glance at matters in other parts of 
Virginia ; and to connect our narrative with that of 
the Army of the Potomac, we will give a rapid out- 
line of Hooker's movements in the winter and spring 
of 1862-63. 



p 



HAPTEN XT 





^HILE the 126th, in their camps at Union Mills 
and Centreville, were guarding the approaches 
to Washington, and receiving military instruc- 
tion and discipline, stirring events were taking place 
in other parts of Virginia. Burtstside' s heroic but 
unfortunate attack on Fredericksburg, where 12,000 
brave men rushed on death at the command of a 
noble and high-minded man, but an inexperienced 
military leader, who, so far from seeking the command, 
had accepted it with genuine modesty and reluctance, 
took place in the early part of December. In the lat- 
ter part of January, Buristside was relieved, and 
Hooker placed in command. Hooker employed two 
months in perfectly organizing and disciplining his 
forces, and in April, 1863, the army was superior in 
numbers and efficiency to any ever seen on this con- 
tinent except McClellan's grand army in the spring 
of '61. It numbered 120,000 infantry and artillery, 
12,000 cavalry and nearly 400 guns. Hooker sent out 
several cavalry expeditions to destroy bridges, rail- 
roads and telegraph lines, one of which got near 
enough to Richmond to see the smoke of its chimneys. 
Hooker's position was at Falmouth, on the north 
side, and Lee's at Fredericksburg, on the south side 



144 The Adventures of 

of the Rappahannock. Hooker decided to cross with 
his army and give battle to the enemy at Chancellors- 
ville, a little to the west of Fredericksburg. The 
crossing was effected with masterly ability, eluding 
Lee's vigilance, and so strong a position was gained 
that Hooker, elated with success, affirmed that he 
held Lee with one hand and Richmond with the other. 
This assertion he confirmed with so strong an expres- 
sion as even to shock some of the army officers, too 
well used to irreverent language. But ' ' man proposes, 
God disposes," says a French proverb. Whether 
Hooker's great confidence made him incautious, or 
whether he lacked the ability to manage the vast 
enginery of an army in the field, or whether, as some 
think, the Gfod of armies would rebuke his presump- 
tion ; from whatever cause, certain it is, the battle at 
Chancellorsville by no means answered its brilliant 
plan and commencement. Our losses, as well as those 
of the enemy, were frightful. Lee's army was not 
captured, nor did ours secure a foot-hold south of the 
Rappahannock. The army fought gloriously ; but 
somehow its leader seemed to "lose his head." Cer- 
tainly this Chancellorsville campaign added nothing to 
the reputation of "fighting Joe Hooker." The most 
noticeable event of the battle, and the severest loss to 
the enemy, was the death of the redoubtable Stone- 
wall Jackson, killed by his own men, who, in the 
darkness of evening, mistook him and his party for 
"federals." 

After this action, Hooker withdrew his forces to the 
north of the river auain, and the two armies lav for 



Oxje Thousand Boys in Blue. 145 

some time confronting each other as before. About 
the 1st of June, it became evident that Lee was plan- 
ning some important expedition. The time was well 
chosen. His army was flushed with success, and had 
been heavily reinforced ; while the Army of the Poto- 
mac was reduced by the mustering out of 20,000 nine 
month's and two year's men, as well as by its losses at 
Chancellorsville. Lee was evidently aiming at the She- 
nandoah Valley ; but possibly this was a feint to draw 
Hooker from his position, on which he would make a 
dash on the Capital. He sent a large force, consisting 
of McLaw's and Hood's Divisions of Longstreet' s 
Corps, to Culpepper Court-house, keeping A. P 
Hill's Corps at Fredericksburg in order to mask his 
designs. Hooker sent out large parties to reconnoitre 
and ascertain the enemy's position, as well as to des- 
troy railways, bridges and depots. Two Brigades of 
General Pleasonton's cavalry, under General Btjford, 
made a reconnoissance to Culpepper on the 9th of 
June. A fight ensued, lasting several hours, in which 
many were killed on both sides, among others, Colonel 
Davis, who led our men across from Harper s Ferry 
to Maryland Heights on the 12th of September. But 
the most important result of the reconnoissance was 
the capture of papers disclosing the design of Lee, 
which was to advance into Pennsylvania. Hooker 
instantly prepared to move northward, keeping the 
line of the defenses of "Washington lest the enemy 
should be tempted to attack it if unguarded ; and at 
the same time keeping his cavalry on his left to har- 
rass the flank of Lke's armv Ewell, who knew the 



146 The Adventures of 

whole country, advanced by rapid marches to the 
mouth of the Shenandoah Valley. Martinsburg was 
defended by a small garrison, Berryville by one of 
3,000 troops, and Winchester by 12,000 men under 
Mileoy Mileoy and his brave band gallantly 
defended his post for a while, strengthened by the 
troops from Martinsburg and Berryville, but the rebel 
force far outnumbered his, and he was obliged to fly 
His fault was in attempting any defense against such 
tremendous odds. The three posts, with valuable 
stores and several thousand men, fell into the enemy's 
hands. A few thousand escaped. The confederate 
army now seemed "master of the situation." Hold- 
ing the Shenandoah Valley, Maryland and Pennsyl- 
vania seemed at its mercy. Government took the 
alarm. The President called on Maryland for 10,000 
men, Pennsylvania for 50,000, New York for 20,000, 
Ohio for 30,000, and Western Virginia for 10,000. The 
Governors of these States echoed the call and appealed 
to the people, but for a time the response was feeble. 
Even Pennsylvania, which was most threatened, could 
not be made to believe the fact. That class of its 
inhabitants who had scarcely decided whether war 
had broken out or not, could not be aroused to a 
sense of danger until they saw their cattle and horses 
flying southward, urged on by southern bayonets. 
Nor was this demonstration long wanting. Jenkix's 
cavalry preceded the main rebel army, dashed across 
the Potomac through Maryland to Chambersburg, 
seized cattle, horses and other property, and went 
back over the border, carrying into slavery all the 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 14 7 

negroes they could catch. General Ewell crossed 
into Maryland, and through to Chambersburg, the 
garrison at Harper's Ferry retiring before him to 
Maryland Heights ; Early's Division pushed on to 
York ; Johnson's to Carlisle ; Imboden moved up as 
far as Cumberland ; A. P Hill's Corps and Lee's, 
with Longstreet' s, united at Hagerstown and went 
on to Chambersburg. Hooker delayed no longer to 
cross the Potomac. His army was divided into seven 
Corps : The 5th under Major-General Meade ; the 
11th under Major-General Howard ; the 12th under 
Major-General Slocum ; the 1st under Major-General 
Reynolds ; the 3d under Major-General Sickles ; the 
6th under Major-General Sedgwick ; and the 2d, 
which now included the 3d Brigade, of which the 
126th New York was a part, under Major-General 
Hancock. Hooker's forces were inferior in number 
to those of Lee, therefore when he reached Maryland 
Heights, and found there 10,000 idle men, he tele- 
graphed to Halleck, the Commander-in-Chief at 
Washington, for permission to add these troops to his 
army Halleck, who had a sort of mania on the 
subject of the importance of keeping a garrison at or 
near Harper's Ferry, refused to grant Hooker's 
request, and Hooker, in what certainly seems like an 
undignified pet, instantly resigned his command. Per- 
haps it was the first time in history that an army of 
100,000 men changed its leader on the very eve of an 
imminent battle. Yet the resignation was accepted, 
and, to his utter astonishment, Meade was put in 
command. But such was the temper of our army, so 
10 



148 The Adventures of 

thoroughly did patriotism actuate its subordinate offi- 
cers, and even its rank and file, that even such a 
change as this was made without the slightest confu- 
sion or interruption of plans. Hooker's farewell to 
his army, and recommendation of his successor, were 
in the best spirit. Meade's order, on assuming com- 
mand, was full of unaffected modesty. The army was 
too much used to such changes to be overcome with 
surprise, and not a delay of an hour occurred. 

We resume extracts from letters and diaries written 
at Centreville, passing over the period from May 12th 
to June 15th, which contains little that is new. 

June 15. — General Lee was moving north with a 
large army, and the Army of the Potomac was slowly 
moving between him and Washington. General Hook 
ee's head-quarters were at Fairfax Court-house. The 
11th and 1st Army Corps bivouacked on the night of 
the 14th one-fourth of a mile from the camp of the 
22d Corps, and lit up the night with innumerable 
camp fires. The 1st, 3d and 5th Corps also passed 
through the camp, as, in fact, did most of the Army 
of the Potomac. Captain Bassett says : ' ' Imagine 
the road running by your house filled with troops 
from one side of the road to the other, and reach- 
ing twenty miles ; then imagine a baggage and 
ambulance train reaching twenty miles farther, follow- 
ing the troops, and about a hundred bands playing ; 
and fancy them all passing your door in a very dusty 
time, on the windward side of your house, and your 
house a cloth one, and the 'fly' of it open, and the 
wind blowing very hard toward it, and you will have 



Oxe Tiroes and Boys ix Blue. 149 

a slight idea of what we have seen since Sunday 
To-day has been very hot, and a good many soldiers 
fall dead by the wayside with sun stroke. * Probably 
we could not have had a better position to see the 
Army of the Potomac. Most of the Regiments seemed 
small, but the men all seemed in good spirits. Stone- 
man's and Pleasanton's cavalry were a splendid lot 
of men, and had excellent horses." 

Doctor Peltier says: "June 20.— Lee is reported 
to be at Thoroughfare Gap, and advancing. The 2d 
Corps arrived here last night. June 21. — Heavy can- 
nonading going on northwest of us It is thought to 
be at Snicker' s Gap, twenty-five miles from here. The 
2d Army Corps moved out from here yesterday after- 
noon, toward Thoroughfare Cap; and Stahl's cav- 
alry, about 10,000, went out in the direction of the 
cannonading to help Hooker. To-night the rebels 
have been whipped and driven into Ashby's Cap. It 
was principally a cavalry fight. June 24. — Well, we 
have received the order to march to-morrow Our 
Division is broken up, and toe go into the 2d Corps 
of the Army of the Potomac. There is a great scamp- 
ering of the ladies now (officers' wives). A good-bye 
now to ease and comfort. Now come duty and dan- 
ger, hardship and hard-tack. June 25. — We have 
over 100 men (in the Brigade) unfit to march. Doctor 
IIoyt goes with them to Washington. June 2S. — On 
horseback, about twelve miles from Frederick, M;irv- 



* A surgeon writes jocosely to a friend : " I tell you this army is a big thing, 
come to get it all together ; and takes a vast many mules, Brigadier-Gene- 
rals, and ambulances to run it." 



150 The Adventures of 

land. We left Centerville Thursday, three p. m., and 
Friday reached Edward's Ferry. We are in the 2d 
Corps, 3d Division, 3d Brigade. We have slept on 
the ground three nights ; one, in the rain. Monocacy- 
* * * Doctor Hott is not with us, and I have to 
work hard, and get very tired. But I lie down on 
the ground, shut my eyes, and that is the last I know 
till five o' clock in the morning ; then up, boil my lit- 
tle coffee, eat a couple of army sponge calces, give a 
dose of opium or quinine to the sick, jump into the 
saddle, follow at the rear of the Regiment, wait on 
every man that tires out, and if very sick give him a 
pass to ride in an ambulance. This is a beautiful val- 
ley ; and I tell you it is a relief to get out of Yirginia 
into a civilized country again. * * * I suppose 
this is Sunday with you, but it has been a kind of 
4th of July with us. * * * While we lay at 
Centerville, Hooker's army called us "band-box sol- 
diers," but our boys have beaten every Regiment in 
the army in marching. * * * June 30, Uniontown. 
— We marched thirty-six miles yesterday, and we did 
not start till nine or ten a. m. It was an awful 
march, and during the last five miles the boys 
dropped down by hundreds, utterly exhausted, but 
they are all here this morning. Doctor Hott overtook 
us yesterday." 

Doctor Hott says: "June 25. — For the past ten 
days all has been life in and around Centerville. One 
after another the different Corps of the Army of the 
Potomac have passed through our camp. In the 
meantime, our cavalry have been active, pressing back 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 151 

Lee's cavalry, and for the moment exposing his con- 
dition and movements. The battle of Aldie has been 
fought, within hearing of our camp, and large numbers 
of prisoners brought within our lines. Lee evidently 
contemplates invasion and soon the two armies must 
meet in deadly strife. * * * The last Corps of the 
army has passed us, and still no order for us to 
move." Captain Wheeler writes: "In the 3d Corps 
there were two women, Mary and Ann, Mary on 
horseback, having been appointed Sergeant by Gene- 
ral Kearney, and Ann in an ambulance. They are 
in Zouave dress ; said to be very brave and present on 
all the battle-fields. It is said that at the battle of 
Fredericksburg they were in the front. " 

It was on the 24th that the welcome order to move 
arrived. The Brigade was ordered to join 3d Divi- 
sion of the 2d Army Corps, Hancock's; and consti- 
tuted the 3d Brigade of that Division. The sick were 
sent to Alexandria and Washington ; surplus baggage 
was disposed of; shelter-tents drawn, and everything 
arranged for a move On the 26th they marched to 
Gum Springs, where they joined Hancock's Corps; 
thence to Edward's Ferry, where they crossed the 
Potomac on pontoon bridges ; thence to Sugar Loaf 
Mountain ; and so on to the Monocacy, whose waters 
afforded the Regiment such refreshment on their 
weary march from Harper's Ferry the September 
before. On the night of the 30th the boys got a little 
rest, then started again, went around Frederick city, 
through Libert), to Uniontown, at least thirty-three 
miles; which, says Captain Whheler, is "the hardest 



152 



The Adventures of 



marching ever recorded of the Army of the Poto- 
July 1st, the Brigade reached Taney town, 



mac 



55* 




UNION MOVEMENTS ON GETTYSBURG. 

where they heard heavy cannonading in the direction 
of Gettysburg. For the great battle there had begun. 

* Extract from General Order Book. 

" Head-quarters, 2d Army Corps, 
June 29t7i, 1863. 

" [Circular.] The Major-General commanding the Corps thanks the troops 
of his command for the great exertions they have made this day in achieving 
a march of full thirty miles.* 

" This severe labor would have only been exacted of them from urgent 
necessity. 

"It was required bj r the Major-General commanding the army, who has 
expressed his appreciation of the manner in which the duty has been per- 
formed. 

" By order of Major- General Hancock. 

"W. G. MITCHELL, 

"A. D. C. and A. A. A. G." 
* Hancock afterward stated the distance as thirty-three miles. 



One Thousand Boys in Bluk. ]53 

The advance of Lee's army under Ewell and Hill, 
and the advance of ours under Reynolds, the latter, 
with his cavalry supported by the 1st Corps, were 
measuring their strength in that first conflict that cost 
the gallant Reynolds his life. On the 2d of July the 
tired troops of the Brigade were formed in line of 
battle to the left of the cemetery at Gettysburg. 

And here ends many a diary The blank pages in 
the latter part of these little books tell each its affect- 
ing story of those who laid aside the recording pen 
on the night of the 2d of July, and before the dawn 
of the ' ' glorious ' ' 4th had laid aside their brave 
young lives, and "slept the sleep that knows no 
waking," on the deadly field of Gettysburg. 

This book being intended, in part, to give informa- 
tion respecting the details of army life ; and the march 
from Centreville to Gettysburg being a specimen of 
many army "tramps," our readers will, perhaps, like 
a more detailed account of it. 

The 126th, with the rest of the Brigade prepared to 
march from Centreville by storing surplus baggage in 
an old church, leaving a small guard over it with 
General Abeiiokombie. But the disappearance of our 
pickets was a signal to guerrilla parties, who captured 
some cars of stores from a train bound to Alexandria ; 
and to save those in the church from the same fate, 
they were burned by order of General Abekcuombik. 
He, with the guard, then went on and overtook the 
army at Edward's Ferry 

During the two days march to that point it was 
rainy, and articles which had been deemed indispensable 



154 The Adventures of 

began to be intolerably heavy The road was strewn 
with shirts, socks and drawers in a way that wonld 
have sorely grieved the careful sisters, mothers, and 
sewing circles who had provided them, while coats, 
blankets, paper and envelopes, and even precious 
trinkets, were sacrificed to ease the sore and weary 
■shoulders of the wayfarers. 

Strict orders were issued, and generally obeyed, to 
respect private property on the march. Colonel Shek- 
eill endeared himself greatly to officers and men at this 
time, by careful attention to their welfare and jealousy 
of their rights. The fording of streams was a very 
severe part of the journey, for the sand and gravel 
filled the shoes and "ground" the poor feet sorely 
Especially the march of thirty-three miles on the 29th 
of June, in alternate rains and scalding sun, with 
blistered feet and soaked clothing, was a terrible 
experience. Every superfluity and many necessaries 
had been thrown away before, but on this day not an 
ounce was retained that could by possibility be spared. 
Gun and cartridge must be carried. All else was 
dropped. 

One incident showing the superiority of spirit over 
matter may be mentioned. On nearing villages, colors 
were unfurled and bands played lively airs. Instantly 
new life would pervade the exhausted troops. Guns 
which had been carried "any way" were brought to 
position, limping steps became firm and cadenced to 
the music ; the line straightened itself and the men 
were soldiers all over The village once passed, the 
music would cease, the flags were furled, the men 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 155 

drooped and limped again, and crawled along through 
rough field or stony highway, faint, hut still obedient 
and onward. 

Arrived at Union bridge they thought, "surely we 
shall halt here." But no. Their commanders knew 
that a battle was imminent somewhere ahead, and on 
they must go twelve miles farther. Through the ' ' long, 
long, weary day" no pause had been made for a 
meal ; the men ate their hard-tack as they walked ; 
and women and children from the houses on the road- 
side, came forward with food and pails of water and 
cups to refresh the boys in blue. Never were cups of 
cold water more blessed. But the spirit of even a 
loyal soldier cannot sustain the body under every 
thing, and in that evening march from Union bridge 
to Uniontown, even the strongest men dropped from 
the ranks by scores and slept where they dropped. 
But surely at Uniontown they may rest. Not so. As 
soon as they arrive, the order comes that the 126th is 
detailed for picket duty that night. (Band-box soldiers, 
indeed !) They stumble along to a wood and take 
position, when the order is countermanded, and they 
sleep where they are, undisturbed. 

June 30th. — The stragglers come up ; loyal men and 
women bring cooked rations and delicacies ; the men 
are mustered for pay (as usual on the last day of each 
two months), and they rest that day 

(Pity the former day's march had not been divided.) 

July 1st. — At Tamytown the men expected to fight, 
fur Meade had selected that place, or one very near 
it. as tin 1 probable battle-ground. To the intense dis- 




MAP of the BATT LE 

OF 

shoiyuiy Positions held* 
JULV l?T2?&3? 1863. 

Union Ij hies. 
Con(falci>ate 

Srahi of I Mite 



p 



HAPTEN 7^ I J ' 



gjlESCBIPTIONS of the battle of Gettysburg have 
£££■ been nearly as numerous as those of Niagara ; 
w but who has succeeded in giving a vivid impres- 
sion of the one or the other \ When so many have 
failed, some of whom were eye-witnesses of parts of 
the conflict — no human eye could embrace the whole 
— it would ill become us to attempt to describe Get- 
tysburg. We shall simply follow the fortunes of the 
126th N. Y. Volunteers ; and if this course takes us 
into the most exposed positions and the hottest con- 
flict of the terrible three days, we must ' ' accept the 
situation," and tell the story as best we may 

Gettysburg ! How that small village, with its rural 
cemetery, where generations of men lived quietly, and 
were gathered in peace to their fathers, has swelled 
in importance, till its name has become historical ; a 
companion name to Bunker Hill and Yorktown ! 

No plan of Stuart or of Lee, of Hook Kit or of 
Meade, marked it as the site of the greatest battles 
of the war, the turning point of the rebellion! The 
spot where He " who stilleth the raging of the sea, 
the noise of its waves and the tumult of the people," 
said to the great wave of rebellion that rolled up into 
the lo}'al north, threatening government, religion and 



158 The Adventures o$ 

social institutions, "Thus far shalt thou go, and no 
farther; and here shall thy proud waves be stayed." 
On that 30th morning of June, 1863, both armies were 
advancing toward each other ; yet neither knew of the 
other's approach. "As unconscious (says a great 
writer) of the imminent shock as are two summer 
clouds charged with storms, and moving upon oppo- 
site winds silently toward each other. Three days of 
battle there were ; one on the outlying hills, west and 
northwest of the town ; and two along the slopes and 
rocky crests, south and southeast of Gettysburg. * * 
Battles between the men of the tropics and the men 
of the temperate zones ; battles in which principles 
were contending in the air, while men were fighting 
on the ground." 

But we must leave Mr. Beechee's truthful poetry, 
or poetical truth, and proceed with details. 

When Lee learned the advance of Hooker's army 
into Maryland, and that it was threatening his line of 
retreat through Cumberland Valley, he gave up his 
design of striking at Harrisburg ; and ordered Hill 
and Longsteeet to march from Chambersburg across 
the South Mountain to Gettysburg, and Ewell to 
countermarch from York and Carlisle to the same 
point. This, Gettysburg, was a highly important 
place for Lee to secure ; for, holding it, he could 
command the South Mountain passes toward the 
Potomac. Meade, in entire ignorance of Lee's plan, 
and not knowing the importance of Gettysburg to the 
enemy — for he had never seen the place — had formed 
a plan to offer battle on the line of Pipe creek, a 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 159 

branch of the Monocacy, near Taney town. Accord- 
ingly the 6th Corps, or right wing of the army, had 
been ordered to Manchester ; the 2d Corps to Taney- 
town, where Meade proposed to fix his head-quarters ; 
the center, composed of the 5th and 12th Corps to 
Hanover and Two Taverns ; and the left wing, com- 
posed of the 1st, 3d and 11th, which would come 
nearest the line of the enemy's march, were ordered 
to Gettysburg, under command of General Reynolds. 
General Bufokd, a cavalry officer of the army of the 
Potomac, reached Gettysburg, with his cavalry, on the 
30th of June, and immediately began reconnoissances 
toward the west and north, to discover Lee's army 
That same morning Hill was approaching Gettysburg 
from the west, followed by Longstreet' s Division. 
Neither force knew that the other was advancing. On 
this morning Buford, who was holding a position on 
the Chambersburg road, was suddenly attacked by the 
van of Hill's army Buford manoeuvred very skill- 
fully to check the enemy until Reynolds should 
join him with his forces, namely, the 1st (his own 
Corps) and the 11th. At ten o'clock Reynolds came 
up, with the 1st Corps, under General Wadswortii, 
and the 11th, under General O. A. Howard. The 
country between Gettysburg and the South Mountain 
range rises into swells or ridges, running north and 
south ; one of them, named Seminary Ridge, being 
more than half a mile west of the village. Our forces 
occupied the latter, and the confederates one further 
west. Our plan does not permit us to give the jiarti- 
culars of the spirited and bloody actions of the first 



160 The Adventures of 

day of the month and of the battle. Reynolds, see- 
ing the great importance of keeping the rebels from 
gaining the commanding heights near Gettysburg, 
rushed to the support of Bueord, and was leading 
his men with great gallantry, when he fell, mortally 
wounded. Fresh forces came up on each side through 
the day ; many prisoners were made on both sides ; 
the carnage was fearful ; the Unionists fought like 
men repelling an invader from their own soil ; the 
rebels, like men in a hostile country, cut off from 
retreat, who must conquer or perish. For more than 
half the day success was with us, but the rebel Divi- 
sions, from northwest and west, came up faster than 
ours, until they outnumbered us two to one. Our 
forces were obliged to retire, some of them to Ceme- 
tery Hill, south of the village, which they reached in 
good order, and joined the troops already placed 
there by General Howard ; but those who retreated 
to Gettysburg were less fortunate, for that village was 
occupied by the confederates under Ewell, who cap- 
tured a large number of our men.* The troops on 
Cemetery Hill received a welcome reinforcement that 
evening, of the 12th and part of the 3d Corps. Han 
cock arrived most opportunely, in advance of his 

* Professor Jacobs says : " But, though the enemy attacked us with two 
men to our one, our left was able, from morning until three in the afternoon, 
not only to hold its own, but to drive back the enemy in their fearful 
charges, and, in an effort of General Archer (rebel) to flank and capture 
one of our Brigades, they captured him and his whole Brigade. * * * 
Early in the morning, the hills around Gettysburg had been carefully 
examined by General Howard and his signal officers. It was his prudent 
forethought that sent Steinwehr to occupy Cemetery Hill, thus providing 
for the contingency that happened three hours after," etc., etc. 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 161 

Corps, in the afternoon, having been sent by General 
Meade on learning the death of Reynolds. His per- 
sonal magnetism and self-possessed bravery, did much 
to restore order among the troops, and inspire them 
with fresh enthusiasm. He reported so favorably to 
Meade of the position our forces had gained and held 
on the hill and ridge south of Gettysburg, that Meade 
instantly decided to forego his own half-formed plan, 
and ordered all the different Corps of our army to 
this place. Indeed it seemed formed by nature for a 
defensive battle-ground. An abstract of Swinton's 
description, with our map, will, we think, give a good 
idea of it to any thoughtful reader. 

The Gettysburg ridge is an irregular, interrupted 
line of heights and hills, running due south from the 
town of Gettysburg. At the town the ridge bends 
back, eastward and southward, in a crotchet formed 
by Cemetery and Culp's Hills. This eastern branch 
commands the portions available for the enemy at the 
north and northwest. Along its eastern base runs 
Rock creek. From Cemetery Hill, the line runs 
southward three miles, in a well defined ridge, which 
there terminates in a high, rocky and wooded peak, 
named Round-top. Little Round-top, or Weed's Hill, 
is a bald spur of the other. (Thus the whole range 
is in the form of an irregular syphon ; its curve 
toward Gettysburg, its longer leg running directly 
south, and its shorter, southeast, from Cemetery Hill.) 
The whole ridge is four miles in extent, but so curved 
that while the line of battle on Cemetery Ridge must 
face westward, that on Cemetery and Culp's Hills must 



162 The Adventures of 

face north and northeastward. To the west, the ridge 
falls off into a cultivated and undulating valley, which 
at this time waved with golden harvests ; and at the 
distance of about a mile is a parallel ridge of inferior 
height, sometimes called Seminary Ridge, which the 
rebels occupied in the second day's battle. The rear 
of these ridges slopes gradually, affording excellent 
cover for trains and reserve troops. The Emmittsburg 
road winds from northeast to southwest between 
Cemetery and Seminary Ridges, running, in fact, 
rather upon the eastern flank of the first, and then 
after crossing the valley, rising on the western slope 
of the other. 

We have seen that on the first day of the conflict, 
the enemy being strengthened by the constant arrival 
of his Divisions from south and west, and onty parts 
of our 1st and 11th Corps having arrived, the rest 
being many miles from the scene of action, the day 
went against us, many thousands being killed or 
taken prisoners. However, they sold their lives or 
their liberty dearly as possible, and the reverse was 
compensated to us by the superior position into which 
we were in a manner forced. When General Meade 
arrived at one o'clock on the morning of the 2d, on 
learning the condition of things and the nature of the 
ground, he was more than satisfied with it, and imme- 
diately continued the work begun by Generals Han- 
cock and Howard, of placing the several Corps as 
fast as they arrived, in order of battle. 

What strange scenes were passing beneath the mid- 
night moon, as, veiled in heavy clouds, she hung over 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 163 

Gettysburg Cemetery on that short July night ! How 
ruthlessly does war trample over what is dearest in 
life, and what is most sacred in death ! To the sleep- 
ers there, the rattle of the artillery, moving into posi- 
tion, and the neighing of the war horse among their 
marble tombs, of course were nothing; but to friends, 
if any were left in the vicinity, how rude must have 
seemed the desecration. But this was death's carni- 
val. The great reaper was now gathering in harvests, 
compared to which the few sleepers in that cemetery 
were as the grains that drop from the wheat-ear in 
the early summer to the myriads that crowd the gra- 
nary in the autumn. 

The same kind Providence which held back Andek- 
son's Corps of Lee's army the day before, thus pre- 
venting the small force we had in the field from being 
entirely crushed, now caused Lee to spend the whole 
precious forenoon, and until after four in the after- 
noon of the second day, in preparation, thus giving 
time to our different Corps, which were making forced 
inarches from various distant points, to reach it in 
time to he placed in order on the ridge, and partici- 
pate in the strife. Well might Lee pause in view of 
the vastly changed circumstances since the previous 
evening, when his elated troops were loudly boasting 
in the streets of Gettysburg that tiny had destroyed 
or captured a huge part of our army that day, and 
would have the rest to-morrow. Instead of parts of 
two Corps, with whom they had fought on the first 
day, here was nearly every Division of our army, and 

the rest rapidly coming up. Stretching along the lofty 
11 



164 The Adventures of 

ridge in his front were Division after Division, Corps 
after Corps, from near Little Round-top on the sonth, 
to the heights near Gettysburg on the north ; and 
thence around toward Rock creek, beyond the Balti- 
more turnpike on the southeast ; while on the heights, 
above the ranks of men, frowned nearly 100 cannon. 
Howabd, with part of the 11th, and Doitbleday, with 
part of the 1st Corps still held their post on Ceme- 
tery Hill, the highest point in the continuous range, 
and the key to the whole position ; part of the 11th 
Corps, and the 12th, under Slocum, occupied Culp's 
Hill, fronting northeasterly, and guarding against sur- 
prise from Rhodes or Ewell ; the right of the 12th 
resting on Rock creek. Next to Howard on his left 
on Cemetery Ridge, — an exposed point because without 
any natural defenses, — was placed Hancock with the 
2d Corps (of which it will be remembered the 126th 
formed a part) ; and next to that, the 3d, under 
Sickles, was ordered to take position. Stkes, with 
the 5th, was near Cemetery Hill. The 6th Corps, 
under Sedgwick, was more than thirty miles away 
the evening before ; but by severe marching got 
on the ground at four p. m, when the 5th was 
ordered to the left, toward Little Round-top. When 
Meade rode out toward the extreme left of our 
line to post the 5th, he found the line, which he sup- 
posed continuous along the ridge, broken by the 
advance of Sickles' Corps several hundred yards 
toward the enemy Meade attributes this movement 
on General Sickles' part to a misunderstanding of 
his orders. It seems more probable that Sickles, 







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Prepared by Col.W.H. Payne. 



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One Thousand Boys in Blue. 165 

finding the portion of the ridge on which he was 
placed, somewhat depressed, and seeing in front of 
him that swell of land upon which the Emmittsburg 
road runs, thought best to abandon the line which 
Meade had indicated and occupy the one in his front, 
lest the enemy should get it, and command his posi- 
tion.* It seemed an act of heroism, and was viewed 
by the rest of the army with astonishment, but it was 
undoubtedly ill judged. "His right Division, under 
General Humpheeys, was thrown forward several hun- 
dred yards beyond Hancock's left, which was to sup- 
port him," leaving a wide gap there. His left line 
continued to a point called "Sherfy's peach orchard, 1 ' 
then ran back obliquely through a low ground of 
wheat fields and woods toward Round-top. Thus 
there was a "salient angle" at the peach orchard, a 
weak point ; and an opportunity afforded by the 
oblique stretch toward Round-top to enfilade that 
line. 

Lee's forces were disposed in the best manner pos- 
sible to him, on the inferior ridge, called Seminary 
Ridge, about a mile in front of and nearly parallel to 
ours. Loxgstkeet, with the Divisions of Hood and 
MoLaws, were on their extreme right, which brought 
them lacing Round-top and Cemetery Ridge, and, of 
course, facing, also, the slight ridge that Sickles 
occupied. Hill's three Divisions continued their line 

* "The object of General Sickles' moving to the front, I could not con. 
eeive. 1 recollect looking on and admiring the spectacle. * * Hut I 

soon saw it was going to involve a fight in front of our line, * * and 

I thought it would be disadvantageous to us." General Hancock's testi. 
monv. 



166 The Adventures of 

from the left of Longstkeet far enough to front the 
whole remainder of Cemetery Ridge. Ewell, with 
his three Divisions, held from the Seminary, round 
through Gettysburg village, and so on at the base of 
Cemetery Hill, ending in front of Sloctjm, on Culp's 
Hill, which was the Union right. Their line stretched 
over five miles, partly concealed by woods. Lee, too, 
had a powerful artillery force of at least 120 guns. 

Meade, seeing the position of Sickles, remonstrated 
with him. "I will change it if you disapprove," said 
Sickles. "The enemy will hardly give you time for 
that," replied Meade; and, sure enough, a flight of 
shells from the other side soon made a change impossi- 
ble. It seems evident from General Lee's report, that 
Sickles' position invited attack, as a weak point. 
He says : "In front of General Longstreet (i. e, , the 
place occupied by Sickles), the enemy held a position 
from which, if he could be driven, it was thought our 
army could assail the more elevated ground beyond, 
and so reach the crest of the ridge." Lee's practiced 
eye saw, doubtless, the thinness of Sickles' line, and its 
distance from support, and this determined his plan of 
attack. As we have said, heavy skirmishing was going 
on through the forenoon and a while after, between the 
lines of the two armies. At two o'clock the enemy 
opened a terrific cannonade, which was known to be 
the prelude to an assault. The 126th, who, with the 
remainder of the 2d Corps, had arrived that morning 
at eight o'clock, were supporting two batteries toward 
the northern extremity of Cemetery Ridge, in front of 
Meade's head-quarters. From this point the scene 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 107 

was now most animated. Staff officers galloped swiftly 
to and from head-quarters, with dispatches and orders. 
Shot and shell, fortunately aimed too high, whizzed, 
shrieked, and burst just beyond the crest of the ridge. 
Under cover of this fire, Longstkeet made a tremen- 
dous attack on that front of Sickles' line which ran 
from the angle at the Emmittsburg road and another 
road back to Little Round-top. At the same time 
Hood's Division attempted to pass between Sickles' 
left and Little Round-top. This hill, which is bald 
and unsightly, and covered with huge boulders, was 
occupied by us merely as a signal-station. But when 
this attempt was made to turn Sickles' left, the 
importance of gaining possession of the hill was appa- 
rent to the commanders of both armies. Most oppor- 
tunely, just as the enemy was advancing to seize it, a 
Division of Svkes' Corps came up, under Vincent, 
and was ordered to its defense. And here ensued one 
of those terrible hand to hand struggles which, as 
well as the subsequent one on Culp's Hill, reminds us 
of the fierce contests in ancient warfare to secure or 
recover the body of a fallen hero. But with this 
difference. Here was added the modern enginery of 
Avar; bullet and bayonet, shot and shell. Whatever 
was savage or terrible in ancient and modern warfare 
was here combined. Batteries were dragged up the 
precipitous steeps by hand; men fought at the veiy 
muzzles of the guns, and were literally blown from 
before the cannon's mouth; muskets were clubbed and 
bayonets crossed ; our Regiment, who heard the uninter- 
rupted firing, describe it not as the rattle of musketry 



168 The Adventures of 

— rather it was a continuous roar, rising and swelling 
and shaking the earth, like the surf on the lbeach in 
a great storm. Both sides performed prodigies of 
valor ; but the close of the struggle left us in posses- 
sion of the corpse-strown sides and summit of Little 
Round-top. 

All this time a furious contest was going on at the 
angle of the peach orchard which we have spoken of, 
and the line running back from it. Sickles' inces- 
sant cry for more men ! more batteries ! was answered 
by reinforcement after reinforcement sent by Meade 
to "patch" his columns, but it was in vain. The 
line was broken. Sickles, badly wounded, was borne 
to the rear. But all that men could do was done by 
Humphreys and Birney to prevent being flanked. 
Hancock, who took command when Sickles was 
wounded, ordered up various detachments of the 2d 
Corps. The enemy had broken through our line in 
more places than one, and the cry came again for 
succor. The 3d Brigade of the 3d Division of the 2d 
Corps, including the 126th Regiment, heard at length 
the welcome order, ' ' Fix bayonets ; shoulder arms ; 
left face; forward march!" and instantly moved 
rapidly for a mile southward toward Round-top, then 
were faced westward toward a shallow ravine grown 
up with trees and bushes, through which were flying 
the routed Excelsior Brigade, driven by Barksdale's 
Bridage in McLaws' Division of Lonostreet's Corps. 
The 39th New York were held in reserve, but the rest 
of the Brigade, namely, the 125th on the left, the 
126th in the centre, and the 111th on the right, were 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 169 

formed in line, and, with shotted guns and gleaming 
bayonets, charged down the slope into the bushes 
swarming with the triumphant foe. Soon, from thou- 
sands of muskets, poured death-volleys into either 
rank, which withered before that consuming fire. Yet, 
with their comrades falling thick around them, cold 
and still, or writhing in the death-agony, our men 
pressed on till they passed through the low woods 
and bushes to the open space beyond, where the 
enemy made his most desperate effort to repel our 
advance. At this critical moment our line wavered, 
when a voice that our boys had heard before was 
heard cheering on the enemy It was Barksdale, 
the same whom they fought on Maryland Heights, 
who now, with oaths and imprecations, was urging on 
the rebels. A low cry, "Remember Harper's Ferry!" 
was heard in our ranks, and swelled into a shout 
from hundreds of voices. Remember Harper' s Ferry ! 
rose above the roar of musketry and the clang of 
arms. The venom of that old taunt, "Harper's Ferry 
cowards !" which had so long burned in the veins 
of this noble Regiment, now excited them to fuiy- 
Barksdale fell with curses on his his lips, pierced 
by musket balls. With bayonets fixed, the 3d 
Brigade rushed on, closing up their ranks thinned 
by shot and shell, and driving before them the 
late exultant enemy Nothing could restrain them, 
nothing could resist them. Scores of their foes were 
killed or wounded ; many in craven fear fell on 
their faces and threw up their hands in token of 



170 The Adventures of 

surrender.* But when it was discovered that their 
own forces had retreated or surrendered, and that 
ours filled the valley, a battery was opened upon our 
front at fearfully short range, gashing the ranks with 
ghastly rents ; but such was the excitement caused by 
the cry that had electrified them, that it seemed as if 
they eagerly poured out their heart's blood to wash 
away that old stain upon their honor. Nor did they 
halt until ordered, and then in perfect alignment, 
carrying back with them through that valley of death 
some pieces of our artillery which had been taken by 
the foe, and one brass gun taken by Captain Scott, 
with his command and a part of Company A. Colonel 
WiLLAEDf fell, part of his head being carried away by 

* Some of them kept this position till they saw the backs of our men ; 
when they seized the muskets they had dropped and deliberately fired into 
our ranks. A few who were seen to do this were bayoneted on the spot ; 
but all the others were treated as prisoners of war. 

f Colonel George Lamb Willard was born August 15, 1827, in the 
city of New York, and early manifested an ardent desire for an appoint- 
ment as a cadet to the Military Academy at West Point, but his friends 
looked with disfavor upon his purpose, and he was sent to a relative in 
Ohio to become a practical business man. 

Soon afterward the Mexican war broke out, and he enlisted in the 15th 
Ohio Volunteers, under Colonel Geo. Morgan, and was appointed a Ser- 
geant in his Company. He was under General Scott in the movement on 
the city of Mexico, and his Company was one of the first to scale the walls 
of Chepultepec Castle, and for his gallantry on that occasion he was, on 
recommendation of General Scott, appointed a Brevet Second Lieutenant 
in the 8th United States Infantry, June 28, 1848; was promoted Second 
Lieutenant August 2, 1848; First Lieutenant December 31, 1853; Captain 
September 27, 1861 ; and Major of the 19th Infantry February 19, 1862. 

He served with the 8th United States Infantry in the early part of the 
war, and through the Peninsular campaign of 1862, as its commanding 
officer a portion of the time, when, obtaining permission from the Secretary 
of War, he returned to Troy and was instrumental in raising a second* 

* Colonel Willard had raised the 2d New York Volunteers, or Troy Regiment, and was 
appointed its Colonel, but was not permitted by the war department to retain the command 
of volunteers while an officer in the regular army. 



One Thousand Bors in Blue. 171 

a cannon ball ; and Colonel Shereill took command 
of the Brigade, and the brave Lieutenant-Colonel Bull, 
of the Regiment.* 

Nor is it too much to say that this charge of the 
3d Brigade changed the fortune of the day on that 
part of the field, hurling back the columns which had 
forced themselves through our lines at that point, and, 
combined with other successes on our side, giving the 
3d Corps opportunity to form on the ridge, where it 
should have been posted at the beginning. The 
enemy at night held possession of the advanced line 
assumed by Sickles, which certainly was not worth 
the sacrifices that had been made by us to retain it ; 
but the gaining of which was regarded by them as a 

volunteer Regiment, the 125th New York Infantry, and was commissioned 
and mustered its Colonel, with rank from August 15, 1862. 

Colonel Willaed commanded the 3d Brigade 3d Division 2d Corps in 
the movement on Gettysburg, until killed by a piece of a shell while making 
a charge on the enemy in the afternoon of the 2d day of July, 1863. He was 
just emerging with his Brigade from some woods and bushes through which 
he had driven the enemy, when the fatal shell carried away a portion of his 
head and face. His body was taken from the field by his faithful attendant 
Joshua Wiseman, an old soldier of the 8th Infantry, and forwarded to his 
late home in Troy. His funeral was attended by the appropriate military 
escort, the members of the Common Councils of Albany, Troy and Lansing- 
burgh, and by an immense concourse of citizens. 

Colonel Willard was a brave and gallant officer and an estimable citi- 
zen, and he proved bis devotion to his country by the sacrifice of his life to 
its service on the field of battle. 

*In this gallant and almost desperate charge fell IIexky "W Willson, a 
son of Jaked Wii.lson, Esq., of Canandaigua. His sprightly conversa- 
tion, obliging manners, genial spirit and versatile talents, which he was 
ever ready to employ for the service or amusement of others, endeared him 
to his comrades; and his unflinching bravery commended him to his supe- 
rior ollicers. Such a man could not but be feelingly missed, and sincerely 
mourned. 

It is hoped that this slight tribute to the memory of a personal friend 
may be pardoned. 



172 The Adventures of 

signal triumph over us. Its saddest consequence to 
us, next to the terrible loss of some of our best and 
bravest, was that we were forced to leave our dead 
and wounded between our lines and those of the 
enemy. * 

The Brigade held its position until dark, when it 
marched back to Cemetery Hill, a little to the right 
of its former position. 

On the right of our curved line, near Culp's Hill, 
there was a fierce struggle in the evening between 
E well' s Division and Slocum's Corps for the posses- 
sion of that elevation. For some time the contest was 
doubtful, both sides using their batteries with fearful 
effect, the cannoniers fighting, as Engineer Hunt says, 
when unable to use their guns, with handspikes, ram- 
mers, and even stones. But a Brigade of the 2d 
Corps coming up, decided that contest too in our 
favor, enabling us to keep our line intact at that 
point as well as at Round-top on our left. The only 

* Respecting the enemy's losses in this conflict, Swinton says : " A ter- 
rible price had been exacted for the success he had won. General Barks- 
dale, the impetuous leader of the boldest attack, was mortally hurt and lay 
within the Union lines, and many other confederate officers were killed and 
wounded." A Richmond Inquirer correspondent says (in an article of 
remarkable candor) : " I have heard several officers say that they have never 
seen the enemy's dead cover the ground so thickly, not even at the first 
Fredericksburg fight, as they did on that portion of the field over which 
McLaws' troops fought." (It will be remembered that Barksdale was in 
McLaws' Division.) An officer, Morgan, who witnessed, from Little 
Round-top, the long line of our men that went down with fixed bayonets 
and firm step into the woods and bushes of the ravine, and who heard the 
terrific roar of musketry while they were engaged there, and then saw the 
line, of only half its first length, but still firm and unflinching, that strug- 
gled up the other side, " stormed at by shot and shell," describes the spec- 
tacle as one of the most imposing of the day. 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 173 

part of the line assumed by Hancock and Meade for 
our operations which the enemy wrenched from us on 
this bloody Thursday, was our extreme right, where 
Culp's Hill comes down to Rock creek; and had he 
gained this earlier in the day it might have been dis- 
astrous to us, for it might have enabled him to attack 
us v ' in reverse ;' ' an attack which, after our grievous 
losses, 20,000 in the two days' fight, we might have 
found it diffieult, if not impossible, to repel. But 
night came opportunely to prevent the enemy from 
following up this success. 



Colonel James JA. ^ull, 

Of the 126th Regiment New York Volunteers, was one of the 
most loyal, brave and patriotic spirits that rushed to the defense 
of our flag in the hour of our country's peril. For the cause he 
sacrificed a cherished and lucrative profession, and gave himself 
to the work of raising men and means with indefatigable earnest- 
ness. Espousing the cause of his country with his whole heart, 
he advocated it with the eloquence of conviction, and maintained 
it during the war with undaunted courage. The line officers in 
his Regiment, as well as his superior officers, bear witness that he 
never flinched from duty, but that whenever called upon he was 
ready, at a moment's notice, for the most daring or desperate ser- 
vice. His enthusiasm communicated itself to his men, and often, 
when others hesitated, his Regiment rushed forward, and, by 
their very impetuosity, snatched victory where defeat had seemed 
inevitable. 





Ht...:.-tfAI: ,n ,jl.i t L. i nL.126 N.Y.Vol. 



COMMANDING .1? BRIG,3°DIV 2° CORP:- 



Chapter y^lll 



^DN the evening of the 2d of July the Union officers 
gx held a council, and unanimously agreed that the 
& line of "battle they occupied was the best that 
could "be chosen, especially considering the decimated 
condition of their forces ; and that, to use an expres- 
sion afterward coined by Grant, "they would fight 
it out on that line." Indeed, as we look at it now, 
it seems strange that Lee should have decided to 
attack that fortified hill ; especially with our ill suc- 
cess in a similar case at Fredericksburg, to warn him 
against it. But Lee evidently over-estimated the 
advantage gained over us in driving back Sickles' 
Corps ; and, besides, he knew that behind our extreme 
right flank an entering wedge had been forced which 
he trusted would be driven home. But Meade 
attended to that little matter, as we shall see. 

At the risk of repetition we will let one or two of 
the men tell the story of the second day's fight in 
their own way It will be found that they add some 
incidents. 

Extract from Adjutant Browns Account — somkwiiat condknskd. 

" We are in the '2d Corps (General Hancock's), 3d Division 

(General Hays'), 3d Brigade (Colonel Willard). July 1st, we 

marched through Taneytown and halted, at eleven p. m., within 



176 The Adventures of 

six miles of Gettysburg. At three a. m., July 2d, wearied and 
sore, we took up our line of march. It was rainy and had rained 
every day of our march. Many of the men were foot-sore. At 
eight a. m. we had reached the extreme front and halted near the 
Cemetery, but soon moved farther to the left. On our right lay 
the village ; in front a little valley, bordered on the further side 
by woods. We were on a crest of ground. Rickett's Battery 
was on our right, at first, and other Batteries disposed around. 
Our position had, as it were, no flanks ; front all round, and we 
could move to any point without marching three miles ; to do the 
same thing the enemy must march ten miles. We had here the 
advantages the rebels had heretofore possessed, the ground rece- 
ding from us on every side. In our front was a low stone wall, 
and an old rail fence, of which we hastily constructed breast- 
works. As we were on the crest, every form was clearly denned 
against the sky. Bear this in mind. 

" The enemy began a lively cannonading, doing little damage, 
and we retained our position nearly all day. The battle was 
progressing around, but in our front was comparative quiet. The 
3d Corps, under Sickles, was on our left, and sustained a repulse. 
A Battery was captured by the rebels. The 3d Corps was driven 
back. The enemy advanced with triumphant yells. The 3d 
Corps wanted help, and the 3d Brigade was ordered to ' fall in.' 
This was half an hour before sun-down. The Brigade, under 
Willaed, left-faced and marched a mile to the gap formed by the 
defeat of a portion of Sickles' Corps. * * * Then, upon 
the evening air, rang out the last word I ever heard Colonel Wil- 
laed speak : ' Forward !' And here, one word as to the temper 
of the 126th. Once before they had done bravely, but had been 
maligned ; and the most infernal lies told by those who should 
have had their honor in their keeping. * * * A general 
order had been issued convicting them of ' cowardice,' of ' mis- 
behavior before the enemy,' the soldier's unpardonable sin. The 
Regiment panted to remove that stigma. Colonel Sheeeill said 
to me : ' I want to lead these boys once more !' And every one 
was determined that half, aye, that the whole Regiment should die 
on the field, but that their record should be clear ; and those who 
so cruelly lied about them can have the satisfaction of knowing 
that their falsehoods drove the 126th to even more certain death 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 177 

than that which would have awaited them. Raising the battle- 
cry Harper's Ferry ! they threw themselves upon the enemy as 
the floods sweep through a valley. The rebel line was broken in 
less time than it takes to write it. Backward, over the hill, fled 
the host that a moment before was victorious, pursuing ; and 
above all the roar could be heard the shout : ' Boys, remember 
Harper's Ferry !' 

" Passing too far, our Brigade was suddenly opened upon by a 
rebel Battery, with grape and canister, at very short range. Now 
the carnage was fearful. Colonel Willard was instantly killed ; 
Colonel McDougal had two horses shot under him, and was 
wounded. Colonel Sheeeill assumed the command, and as the 
rebels were gone out of sight, withdrew the Brigade a few rods, 
to be out of range of that terrible Battery. We had beaten the 
rebels (at that point) and recaptured our Battery. Harper's 
Ferry was avenged, but at what a fearful loss. That night we 
slept on our arms." 

[Extract from a Letter of Lieutenant K. A. Bassett.] 
" As soon as we arrived, eight a. m., the 39th were deployed 
as skirmishers, and the rest of our Brigade, consisting of the 
125th, 111th and 126th, supported a couple of Batteries on the 
right of the line of battle. After a little, Companies B, H and 
K charged upon an old stone barn and cleared it of sharp-shooters, 
who had been picking off our gunners, when J. K. 1' Huson was 
killed and three of our Company wounded. 

" Toward night the battle raged furiously ; the rebels got the 
best of us and captured one of our Batteries. Our Brigade was 
ordered down to retake it. We drew ivp in line of battle and 
charged across the ravine, which is covered with a thick growth 
of trees and bushes, and up the hill on the other side, and took 
the Battery, under a terrific fire of grape, canister, and shell, 
driving the rebels oft' at the point of the bayonet, a great deal of 
the time within one rod of them, our comrades falling thick and 
fast around us. Still on swept the gallant 3d Brigade. Yes, 
the gallant .">d Brigade, uh'a.i Harper's Ferry cowards. When 
we started on the charge, I occasionally glanced my eve toward 
the colors, and noticed that they were kept about a rod in front 
of the line of battle ; but while we were crossing the ravine, I 



178 The Adventures 01 

noticed they faltered, and finally fell ; directly they were raised 
again and Avent on. I then knew that my dear brother had fal- 
len. The boys were falling all around me and appealing to me 
for help, but I could only give them words of encouragement, 
and charge on. In looking over the field after the battle, I found 
my brother, dead ; shot first through the thigh, and then through 
the heart. 

" I have not time to give many particulars, neither do I feel 
inclined to say much at present ; my heart is too full and sad to 
say anything ; and I do not know what to say to console the 
afflicted, for I am as sorely afflicted as any one. 

" We expect to give the rebels another time to-morrow. There 
are ten killed and twenty wounded in Company B. Promotions 
are rapid now a days. If you come, you will find many of our 
boys in hospital, with Doctor Peltier and Chaplain Harrisox." 

[Extract from a Speech of Major Richardson at a Reunion.] 

* * * " And when at Gettysburg, on the 2d of July, we went 
to the rescue of the 3d Corps, and met the advancing rebels at the 
muzzles of their muskets and the points of their bayonets, and 
were checked for a moment in the death struggle, — the cry, 
' Remember Harper's Ferry !' rang out along the line ; and every 
living man, with fatal resolve, sprung forward with new effort, 
and the rebel ranks fell prostrate where they stood, killed, 
wounded or captured. Then it was that Barksdale bit the dust." 

"All niglit," says Adjutant Brown, "some of the 
officers and men were, by special permission, employed 
assisting the Surgeons in hunting for the dead and 
wounded.* 'Twas a dark, cloudy night, and the 

* Nothing could be more dismal and appalling than searching over a 
battle-field in a dark night for a friend or comrade. To turn up one dead 
cold face after another to the glimmering light of a lantern, and see it 
marred with wounds and disfigured with blood and soil, the features, per- 
haps, convulsed by the death-agony, the eyes vacant and staring, — surely 
that friendship must be, indeed, stronger than death which would prompt 
+o such an office, yet it was often undertaken, and even by women ! Dis- 
mal, too, the sight of the dark battle-ground, with lanterns twinkling here 
and there, " like the wisp on the morass !" 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 179 

search was difficult. General Barksdale begged 
Lieutenant Wilson, of Company A, to bring him 
off, but our own men must be seen to first. He was 
brought off next morning, and lived but a short 
time."* "The survivors of the 126th lay encamped 
all night in a belt of scattering timber, to the right of 
their former position, supporting a Pennsylvania Bat- 
tery. Colonel Shereill was in command of our Bri- 
gade, and Lieutenant- Colonel Bull of our Kegiment."f 
On the morning of the 3d Lee found that if he had 
carried our advanced line, he had only brought him- 
self face to face with a far more formidable one on 
the ridge in the rear of it. 

Meade, knowing the importance of dislodging the 
enemy, who had effected an entrance into our lines at 
the right of Culp's Hill, massed some powerful guns 
near that point in the night, and at four in the morn- 
ing saluted the foe with a terrific cannonading. Some 
detachments of the 2d and 1st Corps, who had rushed 
to the aid of the 3d the afternoon before, now returned 
and commenced a savage struggle for the ground the 
eneni} T had gained. For four hours the battle raged 
fiercely here. A part of the 126th were deployed as 
skirmishers, and charged on an old fence to rid it of 
sharp-shooters who were picking off the artillery men. 
Until ten a. m. the battle surged round Culp's Hill, 
the rest of the lines remaining quiet, except some 
firing directed towards our left. At half past ten we 
had regained the lost ground, by enfilading their 

* Others say, however, that Barksdale died the same night. 
f G. I. Rose's diary. 

12 



180 The Adventures of 

attacking lines, and all became quiet save the con- 
tinuous cracking of skirmishers' rifles in front.'* 

Early that morning Captain Scott had been detailed, 
with Captains SniMEE,f Wheeler and Hebent>eein t , 
and their respective commands, as skirmishers, to 
skirmish with the enemy posted in front of Cemetery 
Hill. This is admitted by all to have been the severest 
service the Regiment was ever engaged in. Three of 
these Captains were killed, and Captain Scott, the 
survivor, received two bullets through his clothing. 
Lieutenant Brown, of Company C, was severely 
wounded, and many of the rank and file were killed 
and wounded. 

On the enemy's side, preparations were evidently 

* As skirmishing is a most important feature in war, and as few unmilitary 
people have a correct idea of it, we will insert some descriptive notices of 
this peculiar mode of warfare. So important is it, that skirmish drill is part 
of the training in every well drilled organization. The men are trained to 
use every wile and manoeuvre to conceal their own persons, while they 
watch every opportunity to pick off their antagonists. To run with a dodg- 
jng, irregular, zigzag motion, so as to foil the eye of a marksman ; to crawl 
like a reptile among vines and bushes ; to hide behind trees, or rocks and 
stones, or in rifle-pits ; to keep the eye steathily but steadily fixed upon the 
foe ; in short, to imitate in every possible manner the cunning of the savage 
or the beast of prey, these are the accomplishments of the skirmisher. No 
trick is thought disgraceful ; no stratagem to throw the enemy off his guard 
is thought unmilitary, if only successful ; and, when he takes his murderous 
aim, the skirmisher is fully aware that, at the same moment, an unseen foe 
may be taking equally fatal aim at him. 

In such deadly work were the skirmish parties of the two armies engaged 
on this forenoon, cheered on by their officers, who rode boldly among them 
in defiance of the sharp-shooters, General Hays being specially conspicuous. 

f Captain Shimer was killed while lying down in line, with the men of 
his Company to the right and left of him. As he raised his head an instant, 
it was struck by a sharp-shooter's bullet. Four soldiers near him rolled him 
upon their guns, and, waiting an opportunity when the enemy had just fired 
their pieces, they seized their guns, with the body resting on them, and hur- 
ried to the rear. He was buried the next morning on Cemetery Hill. 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 181 

making for some supreme effort. On our side reigned 
the stillness of expectancy. Suddenly, at twelve min- 
utes to one, two signal shots were fired. Instantly, 
from 130 rebel guns, came a storm of shot and shell 
heavy enough, as it seemed, to Mast everything that 
had life on the opposing hillsides. Our gunners 
sprang to their pieces, and soon eighty guns sent 
back a murderous reply. Words are powerless to 
convey an idea of the tremendous uproar of more 
than 200 cannon, sending through the air every 
variety of missile, grape and cannister, shell and 
chain-shot, bolt and slug, with whirr and hiss, and 
screech or rumbling thunder, mingled with the shouted 
orders of the Captains, and the sudden death cry of 
wounded artillery horses. Only a Milton could find 
and put language together that would give even a 
faint idea of the "confusion worse confounded" of 
such a scene, which, Heaven grant, may not be wit- 
nessed again on this poor war-cursed planet. 

" Immediate in a flame 
All heaven appeared ; but soon obscured with smoke 
From those deep-throated engines belched, whose roar 
Emboweled with outrageous noise the air, 
Disgorging foul chained thunderbolts, and hail 
Of iron globes. * * Infernal noise ! 

War seemed a civil game to this uproar; 
Horrid confusion heap'd upon confusion rose ; 
Bolts amid the air encountered bolts 
Hurled to and fro in jaculation dire. 

Now storming fury rose, 
And clamor such as heard till now was never. 

* * Dire was the noise of conflict: 

* * * Overhead the dismal hiss 
Of fiery darts in flaming volleys flew, 

And flying, vaulted either host with fire."* 

* Paradise Lost ; book VI. We have taken some liberties with the blind 
bard. 



182 The Adventures of 

"During this outburst the troops crouched behind 
what slight cover they could find, thankful for the 
rude breast- works they had made in the morning ; 
but the musket was tightly grasped, for each man 
knew what was to follow ; knew that this storm was 
but a prelude to a less noisy, but more deadly shock 
of infantry " Pickett's Division had come up in the 
morning, and was appointed to lead the grand attack 
upon our lines. Many of our batteries lost very 
heavily, especially the Keystone; and volunteers were 
called from the 126th to help work the guns. Several 
of this Regiment were also killed. ' ' In the emergency 
a dispatch was sent to General Meade that they could 
hold out no longer. General Meade mounted his 
horse, dashing through the dreadful storm of iron 
missiles. On coming up to the batteries he cried out: 
' Men, you must hold these Batteries ! Stand by your 
guns, though every man should perish at his post !' 
He remained among them awhile, riding from Battery 
to Battery, until the crisis had passed, and they were 
relieved. General Meade's head-quarters were in a 
small house, sixteen by twenty feet, situated on the 
Taneytown road; which during this cannonading was 
once under one of the most murderous fires. Every 
size and form of shell of English and American manu- 
facture, shrieked, moaned, and whistled, as many as 
six in a second, and burst near the head-quarters. 
Horses reared and plunged in terror. One fell, and 
then another, until sixteen lay dead and mangled ; 
and many with their heads only dangling in the 
halters where they were hitched. Soldiers, at this 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 183 

point, were torn to pieces in the road, as they were 
passing, and died with that peculiar yell that blends 
the extorted cry of pain with horror and despair."* 

We shrink from such details ; and yet it is well to 
know what this war was ; a war between civilized and 
enlightened men on both sides ; equally familiar with 
the "devilish enginery" of modern warfare. To such 
enginery was opposed, here, and at Fredericksburg, 
and at Petersburg, and in the Wilderness, and on 
countless other fields, not ramparts of iron and stone, 
but the flesh and bones of the very flower of our 
country's young manhood. By every drop of their 
sacred blood ; by every tear wrung from the heart of 
mother and sister ; by every gray head brought to the 
grave in sorrow, and every desolated home, let us 
pray that such a strife may never be witnessed again ! 

This grand "artillery duel" was kept up for an 
hour and a half, their fire being directed principally 
at the left center of our line. Meade, becoming fully 
satisfied that the object of Lee was to demoralize our 
soldiers by the severe fire as well as to drive them 
back from their line, and perhaps silence the artil- 
lery, after which they could charge effectually upon 
us, thought proper to hasten their assault, and save 
our ammunition, by practicing a slight ruse. He 
ordered our artillery to slacken, and then cease firing, 
thus causing the enemy to believe that he had silenced 
our guns. The ruse was successful, and the grand 

* The above extract is from an anonymous lecture on the battles at Get- 
tysburg. We do not vouch for its entire accuracy ; but it is spirited, and 
probably correct in the main. 



184 The Adventures of 

assault began. Seminary Hill, which had seemed as 
vacant of troops as that mountain side which Roderick 
Dhu's whistle peopled so mysteriously with his armed 
followers, suddenly became alive with serried files of 
soldiers. Never was "battle's magnificently stern 
array" more imposingly displayed than in the grand 
charge of the third day at Gettysburg. A mile and a 
half in front, three lines deep, with bayonets set, and 
firm step cadenced to the music, in full view of our 
expectant army, they swept down the slope into the 
valley 

" 'Twere worth ten years of peaceful life, 
One glance at their array." 

Pickett's veteran Corps of Virginians, freshly 
arrived on the field, led the van ; Pettigkew' s Caro- 
lina troops followed, with other Divisions to the num- 
ber of at least 18,000 men. Even those upon whom 
they were advancing with deadly intent, could not 
withhold their admiration. One of our officers writes : 
"Their lines advanced steadily, as at a dress parade. 
Beautiful, gloriously beautiful, did that vast array 
appear in that lovely little valley"* Our infantry 
had been charged not to waste a shot, but to reserve 
their fire until they could make it "tell" on the foe. 
But our artillery, double shotted, was less reticent. 
With murderous aim it "tore great holes" in their 
ranks, which "closed right up," and moved unflinch- 
ingly on. Hancock, who, on that day, had the gene- 
ral command of the 1st, 2d and 3d Corps, says: "It 
looked, at first, as if they were going to attack the 

* Bassett. 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 185 

center of my line, but after a little they inclined 
somewhat to the left, as if their object was to march 
through my command and sieze Cemetery Hill, which, 
no doubt, loas their intention. They attacked with 
wonderful spirit ; nothing could have been more 
spirited. The shock of the attack fell upon the 2d 
and 3d Divisions of the 2d Corps, assisted by a small 
Brigade of Vermont troops, together with the artillery 
of our line ; these were the troops that really met the 
assault. No doubt there were other troops that fired 
a little ; but these were the troops that really with- 
stood the shock of the assault and repulsed it. The 
attack of the enemy was met by about six Brigades 
of our troops, and was finally repulsed after a terrific 
contest at very close quarters, in which our troops 
took about thirty or forty colors, and some four or 
live thousand prisoners, with great loss to the enemy 
in killed and wounded. The repulse was a most 
signal one, and decided the battle. 1 '* 

At the risk of repetition, we will quote again from 
letters written at the time. Captain Bassett sa} r s : 
"Friday, the 3d, the ball opened at daylight, with 
tremendous crashing. Our Regiment were deployed 
as skirmishers ; charged on an old barn and rid it of 
sharp-shooters ; we skirmished all the forenoon, and 
lost three Captains ; and many men killed in Com- 
pany B. 

We were, then drawn up again to support a Battery 
tin our right, when such an artillery dud as was 
scarcely ever known took place, lasting about two 
* Hancock's testimony. 



186 Tbe Adventures of 

hours. Our batteries finally almost entirely ceased 
firing, which led the rebels to believe they had 
silenced them. Directly two lines of battle came out 
of the woods and advanced on a charge. This was 
the grandest sight I ever saw. They reached about a 
mile across the plain ; but they were mistaken about 
our Batteries being silenced ; for they opened upon 
them with grape and cannister, and gave them a 
lesson they will long remember. When they were 
within musket range, our infantry charged to meet 
them, and gave them too warm a reception, for the 
first line nearly all threw down their arms and gave 
themselves up as prisoners. * * * We 

(i. e., our Regiment) also captured seven stands of 
colors, among which was one battle-flag, belonging to 
a North Carolina Regiment, with the names of twelve 
battles on it ; among which were Harper' s Ferry, 
September, 1862, and Maryland Heights.* When the 
boys saw this there was some cheering, you may 
guess. General Hats took it by the staff and trailed 
it behind his horse, and rode along the front of our 
Brigade, the boys vociferously cheering. This closed 
up Friday's fighting." "The Regiment did not learn, 
until the fight was nearly over, that the brave and 
gallant Colonel, then in command of the Brigade, had 
fallen, mortally wounded, during the hottest of the 

* This is a mistake. We copy, from Adjutant Brown, a correct state- 
ment : " Captain Morris Brown, Jr., of the 126th, captured, with his own 
hands, a stand of colors, upon which were the following inscriptions : 
Sheppardstown, Malvern Hill, Manassas Junction, Sharpshurg, Harper's 
Ferry, Manassas, Cedar Run, Mechanicsville, Hanover, Ox Hill, Cold Har- 
bor, Frazer's farm. It was taken, I believe, from the 14th North Carolina. 
Our Regiment alone captured Jive stands of colors." 



One Thousand Boys in Blue 187 

fight."* This was Colonel Sheerill : "than whom," 
says Colonel Bull, who succeeded to the command 
of the Brigade after Colonel McDougal of the 111th 
New York was wounded, ' ' a braver man and more 
faithful soldier never existed, "f 

Captain (now Major) Richardson, one of the 
most cautious of narrators, writes: "On the 3d, the 
enemy made the most desperate effort of the war ; 
and there was undoubtedly the heaviest cannonading 
ever known on this continent ; perhaps, in the world. 
The enemy advanced on our center, where our Brigade 
lay in three lines, when we opened on them with 
grape and cannister, reserving our infantry fire until 
they came within twenty rods, when we poured our 
volleys from rifled muskets so hotly that, although 
most desperately rallied by their officers, they came 
no nearer than twenty rods without breaking. They 
finally fell back in a rout, leaving the ground so 
thickly strewn with their dead that one could walk 
for rods on their dead bodies. 

"On the 4th we had skirmishing, and lost severely 
from their sharp-shooters. Colonel Sherrill, com- 
manding the Brigade, fell, mortally wounded, on the 
3d, and died next morning. Colonel McDougal, of 
the 111th New York, next in command, was wounded, 
and the command of the Brigade fell on Lieutenant 



*»■■ 



* Andkews' diary. 

f We liavi: before us a paper giving an account of the funeral honors 
paid to Colonel Siikiuull in Geneva, to which place his body was brought 
for interment, Did our limits permit, we would gladly enrich our book 
with it ; for he, to whom these honors were paid, richly deserved them. See 
Appendix. 



188 The Adventures of One Thousand Boys in Blue. 

Colonel Bull, Captain Coleman commanding the 
Regiment. (Major Phillips was at Washington dan- 
gerously ill.) Our Regiment lost sixty killed and 200 
wounded, but they drove the enemy every time, took 
twice their number of prisoners, and killed and 
wounded at least their own number. The Regi- 
ment took a stand of colors, with seven battles 
inscribed on it, among them 'Harper's Ferry.' It 
also took several battle-flags. 

" Our victory was complete. The enemy have fallen 
back. All of us are in good spirits. This battle is 
the greatest of the war, and, I think, the last great 
battle, if we are prospered a few days longer." 

If there is some repetition in the above extracts, the 
reader must excuse it. The battle of Gettysburg was 
worth a good many descriptions.* 

* Medals of honor were subsequently presented to Sergeant Geo. H. 
Dore, Company B, 126th Regiment New York Volunteers, and Private 
Jerry Wall, Company B, 126th New York Volunteers, who captured 
colors in the battle of Gettysburg. 



Chapter ^ J Y 



HE Sanitary Commission ! Like tlie bow in the 
cloud after the storm, this blessed commission 
hovered on the retreating clouds of war, bringing 
relief and hope to thousands of sufferers. It was its 
office to receive, at the various stations, the vast car 
loads of supplies sent by sympathizing friends all 
over the country to the wounded and sick, and to dis- 
tribute them to the camps where they were needed. 
We stayers at home knew that every city, village and 
hamlet poured out from its abundance (or its poverty) 
with unstinting hand whatever was known to be 
needed by the sufferers ; but none except those who 
at the great depots received the vast supplies, had any 
idea of the magnitude of the work of the Sanitary 
Commission. Those avIio wish a detailed account of 
its proceedings after the Gettysburg battle, should read 
a letter from a Secretary of the commission, J H. 
DoroL.vs, to F Law Olmsted, its general secretary, 
dated August, 1863, and now published in the Rebel- 
lion Record. He states that the largest store in the 
village of Cfettysburg was used as a place of deposit. 
This became the center of the busiest scene he ever 
witnessed in connection with the commission. Car 
load after car load were emptied here; "till the store 



190 The Adventures of 

was filled, the sidewalk monopolized, and the street 
encroached on. These supplies were the outpour- 
ings of a grateful people. This abundant overflow 
of the generous remembrance of those at home to those 
in the army, was distributed in the same generous 
manner as it was contributed. Each morning the sup- 
ply wagons of the Division and Corps hospitals were 
hefore the door, and each day they went away laden 
with such articles as were desired to meet their wants. 
If the articles needed one day were not in our posses- 
sion at the time, they were immediately telegraphed 
for, and by the next train of cars thereafter, they 
were ready to be delivered. Thus, tons of ice, mutton, 
poultry, fish, vegetables, soft bread, butter, and a 
variety of other articles of substantial and delicate 
food were provided for the wounded, with thousands 
of suits of clothing of all kinds, and hospital furniture 
in quantity to meet the emergency It was a grand 
sight to see the tender care of the people for the 
people's braves. It was a bit of home feeling ; home 
bounty brought to the tent, and put into the hand of 
the wounded soldier. I feel grateful that I was per- 
mitted to participate in such a work." * * 
" With the transfer of our material to town (Gettys- 
burg), the irregular organization was changed to a 
permanent working basis. Doctor W Fitch Cheney, 
who arrived on the 10th, was placed in charge of the 
camp. He brought with him, from Canandaigua, 
seven assistants, Messrs. Latz, Cooley, McGtUINkess, 
Chesebeo, Blakely, Sherwik and Feeshotje. * * 
Cooks had arrived, a large shed for a kitchen was 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 191 

built, and full preparations made for feeding any 
number. * * * A store tent was placed near the 
hospital tent, and given into the charge of two New 
York ladies, whose long experience * * made them 
familiar with all the requirements of this camp. * * 
During the ten days subsequent to our establishment 
here, over 5,000 soldiers, Union and rebel, received 
food here. * * This lodge was continued until all 
the wounded capable of being removed were transferred 
from the Corps hospital to the general hospitals of 
New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Harrisburg and 
York." 

The labors of the commission were those of inquiry 
and relief. The labor of inquiry required constant 
visitation of the hospitals, and consultation with the 
medical officers as to the kind and amount of relief 
needed ; and that of relief consisted in issuing from 
the store-house supplies in bulk to the hospitals, and 
also in removing all patients capable of removal. 
Twenty-four camps of the Avounded, spread over an 
area of eight miles, and containing 5,452 persons, were 
of the confederates. These, from a lack of Surgeons 
among them, had to be cared for, in a measure, by 
our Surgeons and nurses. Mr. D. adds: "The labor, 
the anxiety, the responsibility imposed upon the Sur- 
geons after the battle of Gettysburg, were, from the 
position of affairs, greater than after any other battle 
of the war. The devotion, the solicitude, the untiring 
attention to the wounded on their part, were so 
marked as to be apparent to all who visited the hos- 
pitals. It must be remembered that these same offi- 



192 The Adventures of 

cers had endured the privations and fatigues of the 
long forced marches with the rest of the army ; that 
they had shared its dangers, for one medical officer 
from each Regiment follows it into battle and is liable 
to the accidents of war ; that its field hospitals are 
often, from the changes in the line of battle, brought 
under the fire of the enemy ; and that, while in this 
situation, the Surgeons are called upon to exercise the 
calmest judgment, to perform the most critical and 
serious operations, and this quickly and continuously. 
The battle ceasing, their labors continue. While other 
officers are sleeping, renewing their strength for fur- 
ther efforts, the medical staff are still toiling. They 
have to improvise hospitals from the rudest materials, 
are obliged to 'make bricks without straw,' to sur- 
mount seeming impossibilities. The work is unending 
both by day and night, the strain upon the mental 
and physical faculties unceasing. Thus, after this bat- 
tle, operators had to be held up while performing the 
operations, and fainted from exhaustion when they 
were finished. 

"While his duties are as arduous, his exposure as 
great, and the mortality from disease and injury as 
large as among other staff officers of similar rank, 
the Surgeon has no prospect of promotion, of a brevet, 
or an honorable mention to stimulate Jiim. His duties 
are performed quietly, unostentatiously He does his 
duty for his country' s sake ; for the sake of humanity 
The consciousness of having nobly performed this great 
duty is well nigh his only, as it must ever be his 



Om: Thousand Boys in Blue. 193 

highest, reward. The medical corps of the army is well 
deserving this slight tribute.'' 

We insert this tribute with the more pleasure, that 
none better deserved it than the Surgeons of the 126th 
New York. 

"The 2d Corps hospital was on the banks of Eock 
creek (partially), in tents. It contained about 4,500 
wounded, of whom 1,000 were rebels." But this was 
a secondary arrangement, as will be seen by a private 
letter of Doctor Peltiek, written at the time: "After 
our first day's fight I worked in the hospital till three 
in the morning ; slept an hour on the ground, 
among the wounded ; was awakened by an awful 
cannonading, the shells flying all around us. This 
frightened the wounded, and was not very agreeable 
to us who were not wounded. It lasted about an 
hour, and in the afternoon we made preparations to 
move our wounded to a less exposed situation, about 
two miles down in the woods. We had hardly com- 
menced when another shower of shells came over into 
our midst. Our hospital was struck, but no one was 
hurt, though the shells filled the air over our heads. 
The oldest soldiers said they never saw such terrific 
cannonading. It was during this that our Division 
made their gallant charge," &c. From another letter 
from the same: "I was with the Regiment when the 
first battle opened, but was ordered back to duty as 
operating Surgeon. Had to pass through a hail-storm 
of shells, to get to the hospital; were soon shelled 
out of that, and have now been in the woods forty- 
eiirht hours, with the wounded." 



194 The Adventures of 

Chaplain Harrison, of the 126th, who, like other 
Chaplains, was much employed in hospitals, and in 
caring for wounded on the fields, writes: "July 4th. 
Two hundred and forty-six of our Regiment are killed 
or wounded. The battle-field is covered with the slain. 
The hospitals overflow with wounded. Scores are cry- 
ing for help. All over the field ghastly corpses stare 
at you." "July 6. Ordered to follow the Regiment. 
The sick and wounded to be removed." This was 
made necessary by the tremendous rains of the 5th 
and 6th July The tents were overflowed and every- 
thing movable carried away by the water. The 
severely wounded were in actual danger of drowning, 
and had to be dragged out ; others walked, crawled 
or "wriggled" out, as they best could. The Sanitary 
Commission was most serviceable at this time. 

In the details of battles, it is mournful to read of 
numbers killed and wounded, and our sympathy is 
apt to be confined to such sufferers. But in this con- 
test of ours a new feature was added to the horrors of 
" grim-visaged war." Incredible as it seems, there is 
yet no doubt that the spite felt toward northerners 
by their southern enemies was wreaked upon the 
prisoners that fell into their hands. And there is 
also overwhelming evidence that cruelty to our prison- 
ers was part of a system which was to render our sol- 
diers unserviceable in case they should, by exchange, 
be placed in position where they might be called on 
to fight the rebels again. We do not wish to dwell 
on this painful subject; but our attention is called to 
it by a letter written by a poor fellow who was one 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 195 

of the victims ; taken prisoner at Gettysburg. As a 
specimen of the uncomplaining spirit with which the 
enlisted men bore their hardships, we will insert it 
here. 

Anxapolis, Md., August 31s£, 1863, 
Lieutenant R. A. Bassett, 

Dear Sir: I embrace this opportunity to write to you, being 
the very first one I have had, for I have been lying on Belle 
Island and Libby Prison hospital since the 21st of July, most of 
the time on Belle Island. After you gave me a pass on the field 
at Gettysburg, on the 2d of July, to go to the rear, I went a little 
to the rear of the line, and was not able to go any farther than 
the well, about half way to the road, and lay there until just in 
the edge of the evening, and, feeling some better, I thought I 
could get to the hospital, but our right was driven back just at 
that time, and just as I got to the road our artillery were chang- 
ing position, and I, not being able to get out of the way, got 
struck with the end of the pole, and they picked me up and put 
me in the Battery ambulance with one of the wounded men of 
the Battery, and they took us to a stone house in rear of where 
the Batteries were planted on the new line, across a small brook. 
Shortly our men regained their old position on the right, and the 
Batteries were moved again to the front. We were well cared 
for by the people of the house, and the doctor dressed the Bat- 
tery man's leg and my back, and said we must make ourselves as 
comfortable as possible. After dark our cavalry pickets were' 
posted at the house, and at midnight they got orders to report 
to their Company at daylight, so they ordered an early breakfast. 
When it was ready, they woke me up to eat with them. As soon 
as one of them had done breakfast, lie went out on the stoop, and 
came hurrying in and spoke to the other one. Says he, the 
rebel cavalry are upon us, we will go and give them a brush, 
and oft' they went, but soon came back and told me to make for 
our trains as fast as possible, so we started through the woods 
for the train. About the time we got in the center of the woods, 
nine rebel cavalry came dashing down on them, and they, seeing 
they stood no chance, put spurs to their horses and away they 

13 



196 The Adventures of One Thousand Boys in Blue. 

went, firing their carbines as they went, killing one and wounding 
two of the rebels, but the two cavalry of ours got off all right. 
They went to the house, but the artilleryman was so bad they 
could not get him on the horses, so they left him. This was just 
at daylight. They took me to their reserve picket post, and kept 
me there until about ten o'clock, then moved us to the rear of 
Gettysburg. Early Friday morning we started for the Potomac, 
and went three days without anything to eat, and when we did we 
only got half a pint of flour and a little piece of fresh meat. After 
we got to Williamsport I found John Btjllis, of Company H, 
and Cady, of Company K. After we got to Belle Island, a few 
more from the Regiment. There was old Stboup, of Company 
E, and Smith, of Company H, Madison, of Company E, and an 
ambulance driver by the name of Nittt. Most of them are still 
starving on Belle Island. Three of us came away on the hospital 
boat, and thank our lucky stars that we got here alive. When 
with the Regiment I weighed 160 pounds, now I weigh 123^. I 
saw harder times at Richmond than I have time to relate. The 
suffering of prisoners is horrible to think of, much more to par- 
take of. I will give you a full account of our usage as soon as I 

hear from you. 

Yours truly. 

R. B. SUTTON, 

Co. B, 126*A 1ST. T. S. Vols. 

E. T. Mattiiewsok, a private in Company D, was 
a victim of the rebel cruelty of which we have spoken. 
He was a fine young soldier, eighteen years old, and 
after passing through several battles, was taken by 
Mosby, imprisoned at Belle Isle and Libby, and died 
in hospital January 27, ' 64. 



C HAPTEI^ 




IN the third day's fight at Gettysburg, Lee massed 
his columns (as we have seen) against our left 
'W center on Cemetery Hill, consisting principally of 
the 2d Corps, by which, mainly, he was repulsed. 
The other Corps of the army were held in reserve 
in their positions along the ridge ; and it was undoubt- 
edly Meade's intention that the repulse of the enemy's 
grand charge should be followed by an assault of our 
whole reserve line. General Meade says: "As soon 
as their assault was repulsed, I went immediately to 
the extreme left of my line, with the determination of 
advancing the left, and making an assault upon the 
enemy's lines. * * I gave the necessary orders for 
all preparations to be made for the assault." It seems 
to us now, as it seemed to many in the army then, 
that such an assault by our men, flushed with success, 
upon theirs, foiled in their supreme effort, must have 
resulted in the more complete overthrow of Lee's 
army, and the capture of immense numbers of it. 
But the truth is, that some of the most spirited fighters 
among tlie Corps commanders were killed or wounded, 
and the carnage, during the three days, had been 
fearful among all ranks. Sykks. who seems to have 
received General Meade's orders, was very slow in 



198 Tee Adventures of 

transmitting them and getting the men in line, and 
darkness came on before anything important had been 
done. And, after all, the three days' work had been 
glorious : they had an assured success ; should they 
now attack and fail, the loss would be of all they had 
gained. This was a grave risk. 

On the night of the 3d, Lee began his retreat, 
actively but silently It was continued on the 4th, 
his movements being masked by keeping up constant 
skirmishing in his front and sharpshooting all day 
Besides their rifle-pits, a stone barn, with long, narrow 
windows, afforded them a safe covert, whence they 
could pick off our officers and men with unmerciful 
precision. General Hats ordered the barn to be 
taken. Colonel Bull, as Brigade commander, called 
on the Regiment to do it ; but no response came imme- 
diately ; the risk was too deadly. Lieutenant Geddis 
started up and volunteered, asking Company D, of 
the 126th, to follow him. They did so, as did men 
from most of the other Companies. A high post-and- 
rail fence ran along the Emmittsburg road, which 
must be crossed. Five of these volunteers were shot 
while getting over the fence. Nothing daunted, the 
little Spartan band advanced, keeping along the side 
of a rail fence which ran toward the barn. But such 
a deadly and continuous fire met them from the barn 
and rifle-pits as forced them to abandon the attempt ; 
and now the object was to secure the wounded and 
get back as best they could. Keeping in a furrow 
turned out by a plow, near the rail fence, and taking 
advantage of any kind of coffer the}- could find, the 



One Thousand Bots in Blue. L99 

remnant of them reached our lines again with their 
wounded, Lieutenant G-eddis bringing up the rear as 
he had led the advance.* Our men think that this 
skirmishing on the 4th of July was the most dangerous 
service they were ever employed in, as the sharp- 
shooters hit everything that was seen to move. All 
the while the bands on the hill behind them, jubilant 
with victory, kept "independence day" by playing 
National airs. On the following night, pickets were 
stationed on the field ; Captain Mtjnson", of the 126th, 
in command of our line. It was raining heavily, but 
the sharp-shooters continued their murderous work. 
Our pickets were charged to keep silence, for the 
rebel wounded would question them, and when they 
answered, the sharpshooters would fire in the direction 
of their voices. 

On Sunday the heavy rain continued, but our men 
were all over the field disposing of the rebel dead and 
our own, and caring for the wounded. The moans of 
the latter, says Sergeant Rose, were heart-rending. 

On the morning of the 5th, it became certain that 
the enemy had left, and on that afternoon the pursuit 
was commenced by a large portion of the army On 

* John B. Geddis enlisted in the 126th as a private, was made First 
Sergeant of Company D, then Second Lieutenant, then First Lieutenant, then 
Captain ; and in December, 18C4. he was commissioned Lieutenant- Colonel, 
but on account of the smallness of the llegiment at that time, could not get 
mustered in, and continued to rank as Captain. But he commanded the 
Hc^iment from some time in the autumn of 18G4 until the 31st of March, 
1st;,"), when, in a gallant charge of the 1st Division under Sheridan, Ged- 
dis leading the Iiegiment and cheering on his men with his sword brandished 
aloft, was shot through the right hand. For his gallant and meritorious 
services he was brevettcd Major jj. S. Vols. 



200 The Adventures of 

the 7th, head-quarters were at Frederick ; on the 8th, 
at Middletown ; on the 9th, at South Mountain, and 
the advance at Boonsboro and Rohrersville. The 
diaries of the men record the kindness of the inhabi- 
tants at Taneytown in bringing them refreshments. 
On the 10th, head-quarters were advanced to Antietam 
creek, which was bridged by our engineers, our men 
passing over the old battle-ground. On the 11th, 
General Meade's forces were in front of the position 
taken by Lee to cover his crossing the Potomac. 
This, to us, who know all the facts as they could not 
have been known to Meade and his Corps command- 
ers, seems slow pursuit ; and very severe censures 
have been passed upon General Meade for, first, the 
route he took ; second, his slowness ; and, third, his 
allowing Lee to escape across the Potomac without 
another fight. In regard to the first, after reading all 
the testimony on both sides, with the annexed corre- 
spondence, it would seem that General Meade acted 
upon the very best judgment he could form, aided by 
the intelligence brought by his scouts and reconnoiter- 
ing parties ; which latter, as was afterwards proved, 
was not very much to be relied upon. For the 
second fact there were several causes. Many new 
recruits were just joining the army, and some old 
troops were leaving, their time having expired. The 
army was being reinforced by militia, and by forces 
from Harper's Ferry and other points, and it took 
time to get them all "in hand." Then it rained all 
the time ; the roads were rough and rocky, or 
extremely muddy ; and many of our men were almost 



Oxe Thovsaxd Boys in Blue. 201 

or quite barefoot, and there was a little delay for 
supplies of shoes to reach them. Again, Lee was 
manoeuvering in a country with which he was familiar, 
to find a position where he might fortify himself, and 
stand at bay until he could cross the river. His 
course made it difficult to find him in a place where 
he could be assailed with success. And, in regard to 
the last point, it was supposed by all that the swollen 
state of the Potomac, and the absence of bridges and 
other means of transportation made it impossible for 
Lee to cross that river. With this firm persuasion, 
Meade naturally saw less necessity for rapidity in his 
movements than if he had known, as we do, the facts 
of the case. From all General Meade's correspond- 
ence at the time, it is evident that both he and his 
army expected another fight, and truly desired it. 
When, however, Lee had fortified himself near Fall- 
ing AYaters, and General Meade was anxious to 
attack him, a majority of the Corps commanders were 
opposed to it ; and General Meade himself afterward 
thought that there would have been much the same 
risk as our forces experienced at Fredericksburg,, and 
tit tars at Gettysburg. Certainly the disappointment, 
both to the army and to the country, as well as at 
Washington, when it was found that Lee's army was 
across the river, was excessive, and damped somewhat 
the joy and triumph of the recent victory. 

We pause here to notice a fact which constantly 
presses itself on our attention as we pursue our inves- 
tigations in regard to the Potomac army We have 
examined the reports of army officers, rebel and 



202 The Adventures of 

Union, the letters of army correspondents (as given in 
the Rebellion Record and in newspapers), magazines, 
histories, biographies, cyclopedias, reports on the con- 
duct of the war, testimony before congressional com- 
mittees, addresses and speeches, Swinton's Army of 
the Potomac, and Greeley's large work, in short, 
every source of information within our reach, and 
everywhere we are met by one contrast. The writers 
on the rebel side are, in general, disposed to praise 
their army and its leaders. Every little success is 
magnified into a wonderful victory over the federal 
armies. Every blunder is studiously covered up. 
Every signal victory is hailed as the sure prelude to 
the final destruction of our armies and the triumph of 
the confederacy. Their Generals seem usually to have 
enjoyed the confidence of government and people ; 
their errors, often very great, were overlooked ; they 
were not constantly changed to make room for inex- 
perienced aspirants. In short, in the south, we find 
a single purpose, animated by a single sentiment. 
The purpose was to establish southern supremacy on 
this continent, and destroy federal government. The 
sentiment was hatred of the north, as a people and as 
individuals. This unity of sentiment and purpose 
gave unity to all their plans and movements, and the 
strength of concert to all their operations. And then, 
although the war was initiated by them, and accepted 
by the north as a necessary evil, yet, as nearly all 
the fighting was on their soil, nothing was more 
easy than for their demagogues to represent "the 
Yankees" as aggressors, and "to fire the southern 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 203 

heart" by appeals to defend their firesides from the 
ruthless invaders of their territory 

But, in reading the writings of Unionists, we are 
struck by a painful contrast. It seems as if the north 
sent out its army of soldiers to fight on the field, and 
resolved itself into an army of critics to fight at home. 
In reading the diaries of the boys in blue, one is filled 
with sadness and indignation to find how keenly they 
felt the want of sympathy and appreciation at home. 
How depressing it was to them that, in many quar- 
ters, every little reverse was magnified into a defeat ; 
every movement that failed of success was called a 
wretched blunder ; while the skill and tact of the 
rebel leaders was lauded. The reason seems to be, 
the south was a unit ; the north was a house divided 
against itself. And although the final victory brought 
apparent unanimity and universal rejoicing, still there 
is much reason to believe that a rebel triumph would 
have elicited much sympathy ; certainly among those 
who had no hearty love for our northern institutions. 



p 



HAPTEN XV T. 





'E will go back a little in order to tell the story 
of the Regiment. 
On tlie 3d of July the Regiment marched to 
Two Taverns, and halted for the night and next day, 
expecting rations, but none came ; and on the 7th 
they reached Taneytown, where the people were hos- 
pitable and supplied them with bread. On the 8th 
and 9th the Regiment marched nearly twenty-five 
miles a day in the rain and mud. On the 10th the 
Regiment acted as guard to a wagon train, and the 
next day went on picket, but were recalled to join a 
reconnoitering party to ascertain the whereabouts of 
the foe, in which they succeeded. On the 11th they 
passed through Crampton's Gap, and were joined by 
several thousand militia. They worked hard all night 
in a hard rain in making breastworks of rails and 
earth, and the next day both sides seemed manceu- 
vering for a position. Here the boys were cheered by 
the arrival of a very large mail, the first for nearly 
three weeks. Our forces were drawn up in line of 
battle on the 13th ; a fine large stone barn was fur- 
nished for a hospital ; lint, bandages and surgical 
instruments made ready ; all expected a severe battle. 
The next day, seeing no enemy, our lines were 



206 The Adventures of 

advanced, more earthworks thrown up ; still the 
enemy were quiet. The night before, writes one,* "I 
had a floor and some nice quilts to lie on, and think- 
ing the enemy was in a tight place, where he would 
have to fight his way out, slept soundly. The 14th 
the news that Lee had escaped came like a thunder- 
bolt on the army. Everybody looked disheartened 
and discouraged ;' ' and, of course, there was some 
fault finding. 

However, no time was lost ; all started in pursuit. 
They marched rapidly, crossing part of the old battle- 
ground at Antietam, through several other towns, and 
at length reached the canal opposite Harper's Ferry 
The canal is cut in solid rock, but its tow-path was 
the only bed our soldiers had that night, f The cav- 
alry horses suffered most, as there was no provender. 
The whole army halted here the next two days, 
receiving needed supplies and witnessing the changes 
made by war around Harper' s Ferry ; the hills par- 
tially stripped of woods, and fortifications frowning 
from the heights. A wire bridge had been thrown 
across the Shenandoah. Crossing the Potomac (on a 
pontoon bridge) and the Shenandoah, they came into 
Loudon Valley, wherewere black berries in inexhausti- 
ble abundance. It seemed a providential supply, like 

* The same writer in another place says : " We sleep on the ground, in 
which there is one advantage, for we do not have to shake up our beds or 
air the feathers." 

\ On one side of the canal the rocks form precipices of from fifty to two 
hundred feet high, and on the other side of the tow-path the Potomac surges 
along at our feet, All very sublime, doubtless ; but I have seen feather beds 
which were softer to lie on. — [Private letter from Doctor Peltier.] 



Oxe Thousand Boys ix Blue. 207 

the manna in the wilderness, sanitary as well as salu- 
tary ; nor did it fail for many days. This, and the 
music of the hands at evening, cheered the tired and 
foot-sore way-farers. Sometimes our men, straying 
too far picking berries, were themselves picked up by 
guerrillas. The inhabitants were spiteful and inhos- 
pitable. Thus they followed up the valley, Lee and 
his armies on one side of the mountains, our army on 
the other, and nearly on a line. Meade contemplated 
a flank movement at Manassas Gap, and five Corps, 
the 3d, under General French, taking the lead, were 
prepared to make it ; but, says General Waeren, 
the assault was very feebly made by a single Brigade 
of French's Corps, and a whole day was wasted, 
which Lee improved in slipping off. Greatly was 
General Meade disappointed at losing this last oppor- 
tunity of attacking Lee in flank. The army retraced 
their way through Manassas Gap, on the horrible 
road, full of boulders and rough stones and cut by 
wild torrents ; and went on more leisurely toward the 
Rappahannock, while Lee went toward Culpepper. 
On the 25th they reached White Plains, where several 
men, some of them belonging to the 126th, were cap- 
tured by guerrillas, and carried to Richmond prisons, 
in which they perished.* On the 26th the army 
passed through TVarrenton, with bands playing and 

* Edward T. Mathewsox, a private in Company D, died in hospital at Rich- 
mond, November 14, iy(i:>, aged eighteen. He was a noble and brave sol- 
dier, prompt and efficient in the performance of his duties, amiable in dispo- 
sition, respected by all his fellow soldiers. He fought, and fought well, at 
Maryland Heights, September 13th,' 02, and at (Jettysburg during the awful 
three days. While picking berries at White Plain, on the '2.~ith of July, '63, 



208 The Adventures of 

colors flying, to Warrenton Junction, where the troops 
had a much needed rest of four days, giving them 
such an opportunity of attention to their persons and 
wardrobes as they did not often enjoy. Several conva- 
lescents rejoined them. On the 30th they moved to 
Elk Run, in which place they remained more than a 
month."* The Corps was commanded by General 
William Hats, after the wounding of Hancock at 
Gettysburg, until Warren took command in the lat- 
ter part of August. The weather was intensely hot ; 
the men were employed on picket duty Doctors 
Peltier and Hott were both ill, and several other 
officers and men, worn out by hard marches, sleeping 
in wet clothing in the open air, often with insufficient 
rations and other hardships. Lieutenants GrEDDis and 
Lincoln were on the sick list, -f- On the 3d of August 

Moseby's guerrillas seized him, with others, and carried them away 
prisoners. He was placed first in Libby prison, then in Belle Isle ; sickened, 
of course, was taken to hospital, and died. 

* "General Meade states that he expressed the opinion to the government 
that the pursuit should still be continued, * * * but that he was 
directed by the General-in-Chief to take a threatening attitude on the Kap- 
pahannock, but not to advance." [Report before the Committee, &c] 

f An interesting letter from the latter, while recovering from illness, is 
before us. We give an extract : " Last night our band, the finest I almost 
ever heard play, serenaded a lady of the Sanitary Commission who is here. 
They played for nearly two hours, and such sweet music ! * * * Well 
do I remember the day we left Gettysburg, after being three days under fire 
and all worn out with fatigue, our Division halted to rest near our Corps 
hospital. This same band were playing; when finally they struck up 
" When this cruel war is over," every heart seemed touched, every mind 
wandered to something absent. No one felt like saying a word. There was 
the hospital filled with men who a few days ago were as active as the best. 
Many eyes filled with tears. Just then General Hats, our idol, came riding 
along, and instantly every hat went up, and cheer upon cheer greeted him. 
With his hat in his hand, as he rode along, he seemed possessed by the same 
feeling as the rest of us. The scene made a deep impression. 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 209 

divine service was held at Division head-quarters in 
token of gratitude to God for victory near Charles- 
ton, South Carolina ; at which about 3000 were present. 
(We have omitted to state that divine service was held 
on the Sabbath, whenever the circumstances of the 
army permitted.) At Elk Run the 2d Corps made 
amends for long labor and enforced abstinence by 
great indulgence in sleep and improper food, which 
produced sickness. The medical department took the 
matter in hand, and in conjunction with the military 
authorities enforced sanitary regulations ; ordering 
boiled and baked instead of fried meats, regular drill 
for exercise, and moving camps from sheltered woods 
to breezy and exposed positions. Their rations while 
here were good and wholesome. Pickles, pepper, rice, 
and fresh vegetables were furnished in abundance, and 
were of great service in restoring health. 

This camping in the woods was picturesque, if not 
healthful. When they built their fires, the smoke, 
hanging in the green tree tops, overarched them like 
the dome of a cathedral, while the red light gleamed 
on their bronzed faces and weapons, giving the whole 
scene a wild and unreal look. But, regardless of the 
picturesqueness of the grouping, the men toasted their 
meat and hard tack on forked sticks, and boiled their 
coffee, and cracked their jokes, and lay down in the 
leaf-carpeted forest, and gave themselves up to dream- 
less sleep, undisturbed by thoughts of what the mor- 
row might have in store for them. 

For a month the army had comparative rest. Since 
leaving Centreville they had marched over 500 miles, 



210 The Adventures of 

often with scanty rations, sometimes with none ; sleep- 
ing on the ground, shelterless, poorly shod, and with 
insufficient clothing ; they had fought one of the 
severest battles of the war, and harrassed the retreat 
of the enemy at Harper's Ferry and at Ashby's and 
Manassas gaps. The Regiment was sadly reduced, 
its loss in officers being specially severe.* Their rest, 
however, was only comparative ; all the diaries record 
constant and severe picket duty 

On the 30th of August the Regiment was ordered 
to Falmouth, opposite Fredericksburg, to support 
Buford's, Gregg's and Kilpatrick's cavalry The 
rebels having captured two of our iron-clad boats, 
these Divisions of cavalry were sent to destroy the 
boats. The expedition was entirely successful, and 
the 126th marched back to camp, eighteen miles, in 
six hours, which thej^ thought "pretty tall marching." 

On the 12th of September, the army broke camp at 
Elk river, and marched by way of Bealton, Rappa- 
hannock and Brandy Stations, on the Orange and 
Alexandria railroad, to Culpepper Court House ; the 
cavalry, supported by infantry, fighting the enemy all 
the way from Brandy Station, and capturing a section 
of a battery and a number of prisoners. This move- 
ment of Meade was made in consequence of informa- 

* Doctor Hoyt writes, August 22d, 1863: " To-day is the anniversary of 
the muster of our Regiment. Then we numbered 1,000 men ; now we have 
less than 300 present. The balance are dead, discharged, or scattered in 
various hospitals (and prisons) in the country. Colonel Sherrill, Captains 
Wheeler, Shimer and Herendeen, Lieutenants Sherman and Holmes, 
Sergeant-Major Cook, and Color Sergeant Bassett, are among the dead. 
Company B comes out with only five men under Bassett. The whole line 
(on dress parade) shows less than 200 men for duty. What a sad change !" 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 211 

tion received that Lonostreet's Division had been 
detached from Lee s army and sent to reinforce Bragg, 
who was hard pushed by Rosecranz, in Tennessee. 
(To this reinforcement Bragg probably owed his sub- 
sequent success at Chickamauga. ) Meade took advan- 
tage of this reduction of the forces opposed to him, to 
attack them. Our cavalry dashed across the Rappa- 
hannock and drove the enemy across the Rapidan, 
and Meade, following with our whole army, took- 
possession of Culpepper, and the region between the 
two rivers. Lee took a strong position south of the 
Rapidan, but his left flank still rested on Robertson's- 
river. The 3d Brigade was marched quietly and 
secretly around the base of Cedar mountain to Rob- 
ertson's river, and immediately went on picket, the 
whole Brigade going out at once, and remaining out 
three or four days. Thus this Brigade became a kind 
of watch or sentinel for the army. The duty was deli- 
cate and important, but the men of the 126th seem to 
have enjoyed it. The weather was generally good. 
Straw was abundant for beds, and partially ripened 
corn for food. The boys improvised graters by 
punching holes in their old canteens, and soon reduced 
the corn to a state in which it made excellent cakes. 
The "Johnny Rebs,' 1 as our men called them, were 
so near that an interchange of civilities was kept up, 
in spite of prohibitory regulations. Men would joke 
together to-day, who expected to shoot each other 
to-morrow So little ■private animosity is there in war, 
except on the field of carnage. 



14 



212 The Adventures of 

Meade would now have attempted a flanking move- 
ment against the enemj", but just at this time his own 
forces were reduced. Besides a force sent to South 
Carolina, the 11th and 12th Corps of his army, under 
General Hooker, had been detached and sent to Ten- 
nessee ; a great loss just then to Gfeneral Meade, but 
a grand opportunity for Hooker, enabling him to 
participate in Grant's glorious operations at and 
around Chattanooga, and to retrieve at Lookout 
Mountain and Missionary Eidge the sad reverse at 
Chancellorsville. Our army in Virginia was further 
depleted by the shameful necessity of sending troops 
to enforce the draft in New York city, which had 
been the scene of riots on a recent occasion of the 
kind. Thus was Meade reduced to the defensive. 
And now for several days both armies lay almost in 
sight of each other, vigilant and watchful, until about 
the 8th of October Lee attempted offensive operations. 
It is impossible to gather from his report whether his 
design was merely to dislodge our army from its 
position, or whether he had ulterior designs on our 
Capital. Whatever his design, he certainly attempted 
by a flank movement to get between our army and 
Washington, and cut off our railway communication. 
He managed his advance very adroitly, taking, as he 
says, "circuitous and concealed roads," and leaving 
General Fitz Lee to make a feint of holding the posi- 
tion south of the Rapidan. On reaching James city, 
Lee encountered the advance of our army, which fell 
back toward Culpepper, thus bringing Meade the 
important intelligence of his flank movement. Noth- 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 213 

ing was left for Meade now but to foil Lee's design 
of interposing between our army and Washington, and 
then to fight him wherever he should have him at 
advantage. 

On the 10th of October all was activity in our lines. 
Thinking the enemy to be skirting the Blue Ridge in 
order to flank us, the 2d Corps was formed in line of 
battle about two miles west of the town. The next 
day the army, having destroyed their stores and the 
bridge at Kappahannock station, marched to Bealton 
station, eighteen miles, the 2d Corps under General 
Warren, covering the rear. All the way, trains of 
sick and of stores were hurrying to the rear, that is, 
toward Washington. On the 13th the army arrived at 
evening near Auburn, our Regiment, very tired, hav- 
ing acted as flankers most of the day. Our army 
marched in orderly columns on several parallel roads, 
while Lee, whose design was to flank us and cut off 
our retreat, took more circuitous routes to our left. 

The 14th, before sunrise, found all on the move, 
although the morning Avas foggy and dark, u our'" 
Brigade of "our ,, Division leading the Corps, and 
"our" Regiment in the rear of the Brigade. Scarcely 
had the troops crossed the ford (of Cedar Run) when 
the enemy opened in their rear with musketry and 
artillery, and in their front with dismounted cavalry, 
under Colonel Ruff in, and a light Battery The 
men deployed as skirmishers, when attacked by the 
enemy s cavalry, gave way at first; and General 
Hays, seeing the condition of affairs, spurred his horse 
to the rear and said, '"Colonel Bull, take vour men 



214 The Adventures of 

and deploy them to the right of the road, and see 
what is in those woods. We'll see if your men will 
run !" Lieutenant-Colonel Bull instantly led his men 
on the double-quick across an open field, under a 
sharp fire, toward the wood-covered knoll in the front, 
where a Battery seemed to be posted. The meadow 
was covered with strong, tall grass, and on the right 
of it was a high fence. While our men were advanc- 
ing on the run, a body of the enemy's cavalry 
swept down on their right between them and the 
fence. The right of the Regiment swung round 
a little, and poured such an incessant fire into 
them as unhorsed several of them and killed their 
leader. Still our Regiment rushed on, gained the 
woods and the road beyond it, but the section of 
artillery which had been there had been removed by 
the cavalry. Of this spirited action General Hats 
reports: "The rebel cavalry, led by Colonel Thos. 
Ruffin, charged vigorously on the deployed 126th, 
under Lieutenant-Colonel Bull, and were most gal- 
lantly repulsed, with the loss of their leader, who was 
mortally wounded." The 126th continued to act as 
flankers and skirmishers, making their way through 
fields and over fences as best they might, while the 
army kept the road, all the way to Catlett's station, 
which they reached about noon. 

To understand the importance of this ' ' short but 
very decisive action," as General Hays calls it, we 
must notice the critical situation of General War- 
ben at this juncture. His was the rear Corps of the 
army- All the other Corps had crossed the run, and 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 215 

were going on toward Centerville. On the morning 
of the 14th he suddenly found himself attacked in 
front and rear by the enemy. Caldwell, with the 
rear Division of the 2d Corps, was attacked on the 
south side of the run by Stuart's cavalry, and at the 
same moment Hats' Division which led the Corps, 
encountered E well's force, as has been related. 
Warren, in his report, speaks of it as a moment of 
great peril ; being, as he says, ' ' attacked on every 
side, my command separated by a considerable stream, 
encumbered with a wagon train, and in the vicinity 
of the whole force of the enemy." But the gallant 
action of the 126th and 12th New Jersey Volunteers 
cleared the route on which the Corps was to advance ; 
and the deployment of skirmishers, and the skillful 
use of artillery, kept the enemy in check while Cald- 
well's Division, which brought up our rear, effectu- 
ally covered the retreat till the threatened danger was 
over.* 

On arriving at Catlett's station, the 126th remained 
on picket for an hour, and then took its place in the 
column, the 111th acting as skirmishers. The Regi- 
ment had to "double-quick" to assume its place in 
the rear of the Brigade, which still led the Division. 

Centerville was the point where Meade had resolved 
to concentrate his forces and give battle to the enemy 

* The fine, soldierly enthusiasm of General Hays, and his appreciation 
of the services of his men, which endeared him to all their hearts, were 
shown on this occasion, when, after the 12Gth had driven the enemy, and 
repulsed the cavalry attack, he rode to the front of the Regiment, bared his 
head, and with tears of grateful emotion, thanked the Regiment for its gal- 
antry, and said : " You have this day raised your old commander (Siier- 
rill) up another round of the ladder of fame !" 



216 The Adventures of 

Toward this point all the Corps of our army were 
hastening, while the enemy was trying to intercept us. 

When, at four o'clock in the afternoon, the 2d 
Corps reached Bristow, where the railroad crosses 
Broad Kun, the rear of the 5th Corps, Sykes command- 
ing, had just crossed the stream. The 2d Corps fol- 
lowed, the batteries fording the stream, the men pick- 
ing their way across, some on the railway ties, some 
on stepping stones, the whole line a good deal 
stretched out, and somewhat straggling. After cross- 
ing, the Brigade moved to the right of the railroad, 
through woods and low pines, until it emerged in an 
open plain which extended on both sides of the rail- 
road for some distance, and then rose into a gentle 
hill, the railway itself being in a somewhat deep cut. 
Suddenly heavy firing was heard. It was the enemy 
preparing to attack the rear of Sykes' column. The 
sudden apparition of the 2d Corps changed their pro- 
gramme, and they turned furiously on the new 
intruder. Warren, seeing what seemed the whole 
force of the enemy coming upon him, sent to Sykes 
for assistance. He replied that his orders were to 
report at Centerville. Warren uttered some pretty 
strong Saxon words, and added : "I will whip them 
alone, then." As the enemy came out of the woods 
on the left, they encountered our flankers, and sharp 
skirmishing ensued. 

General Hays, who was riding in front, saw the 
position of things, turned his horse and galloped down 
past the Regiments, calling to each : ' ' By the left 
flank; double-quick; march!"' adding, "get that 



One 1'hocsaxd Boys ix Blue. 2Y7 

cut, boys, before the enemy gets it !" Each Regi- 
ment, as it got the order, rushed for the railroad cut ; 
first the 125th, then the 39th, then the 126th. It was 
now a race on both sides for this cut ; the shot and 
shell of the enemy, from a Battery on the hillside, 
whizzing and buzzing among our men as they ran, 
but doing little damage, while our skirmishers did 
their utmost to impede their advance. With shouts of 
exultation, our men gained the position, which was 
a most advantageous one, the railway forming a nice 
breastwork. From this they poured a murderous fire 
into the advancing enemy, while themselves were under 
cover. There was a small hut on the other side of the 
road, and the enemy massed on the left of that. 
Seeing this, Arnold's Rhode Island Battery was 
placed on the gentle slope back of our forces, and 
literally blew them to pieces as they stood. The 2d 
Brigade, which had gained a point in some bushes on 
the enemy's right, swept down on the flank of the 
already disorganized and shattered columns, and com- 
pleted their rout. Many were killed or wounded, 
six or seven hundred surrendered as prisoners, and 
the rest fled in utter confusion, leaving their Battery 
on the hillside. Observing this, one Company from 
each Regiment in the Brigade (Company C, commanded 
by Captain Scott, from the 12Gth) was detailed to go 
and bring off the guns ; which was done amid the 
most vociferous cheering. Five guns and two battle 
flags, besides the prisoners, were the trophies of the 
3d Brigade, which was the one principally engaged on 
this occasion, because it happened to be in a position 



218 The Adventures of 

to receive the enemy's attack. The 2d Corps was 
complimented in a general order,* and was allowed to 
have "Bristow" inscribed on its banners. The fight 
closed up at dark with a sharp artillery duel.f 

The importance of the battle of Bristow Station, and 
the utter discomfiture of the enemy, is shown by the 
reports of their Generals after the battle. We find in 
them none of their usual brag and bravado, not even 
an attempt to deny their defeat ; the whole tenor of 

* Head-quarters Army of the Potomac, [ 
October 15th, 1863. i 
General Orders : 

The Major-General commanding announces that the rear guard, consisting 
of the 2d Corps, were attacked yesterday, while marching by the flank. 

The enemy, after a spirited contest, were repulsed, losing two colors, a 
Battery of five guns, and 450 prisoners. 

The skill and promptitude of Major-General Warren, and the gallantry 

and bearing of officers and men of the 2d Army Corps, are entitled to high 

commendation. 

By command of Major-General MEADE. 

(Signed) S. Williams, 

Acting Adjutant- General. 

\ One young man, A. S. Andrews, whose diary breaks off abruptly at 
Bristow, had a remarkable experience. It was told me by Corporal Peck, 
who was slightly wounded at the same battle, and confirmed by Dr. Peltier 
and others. He was wounded while on the " double-quick," stooping for- 
ward, the ball entering his throat, after grazing his chin, and coming out at 
the left side of the spine, partially severing the windpipe. In this condition, 
both he and Peck were made prisoners. In broken whispers he begged the 
latter to see him buried, which was promised. Both were taken to the 
house of a Mr. Porter, and when an ambulance came there for the 
wounded, Peck was taken, and begged hard for his friend. " We don't 
carry dead folks," said the rebel Surgeon, who, however, stuck a little lint 
in Andrews' wound, and the poor fellow was left in the hut of Mr. Porter. 
When our army passed that way again, they found Andrews still alive, and 
sent him to Washington, where he was carefully nursed until he was restored 
to tolerable soundness. Poor Peck, on the contrary, tasted the sweets of 
most of the southern prisons, and was released only when the advance of 
our armies made it necessary for them to give up their prisoners. When 
the woman at the house was asked what she had done for Andrews while 
he lay there, she said: " Well, I gave him pepper tea ! " 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 210 

their communications to their superior officers is 
exculpatory and apologetic. They admit large num- 
bers of men engaged on their side, and great losses, 
especially of officers ; but make extravagant statements 
of the numbers on our side, and of our fortified posi- 
tions. The preceding narrative will show how much 
chance we had for fortifying. It was a fair fight, 
and they were beaten, with very small loss on our 
part. For gallantry in the actions at Bristow and 
Auburn, Lieutenant-Colonel Bull's rank was raised 
to Colonel; so that, as he says, he was permitted to 
"wear the eagles. "* 

At half past nine the 2d Corps, which had lain in 
line of battle until then, stole noiselessly away The 
men were wakened quietly ; everything that could 
jingle or rattle was secured ; in a long, black line 
they moved off through the darkness ; and passing 
near enough to the enemy to hear their conversation, 
they marched on, undiscovered, toward Centreville. At 
three a. m., they lay down in their blankets on a 
slope a little east of Bull Run, and, in spite of hun- 
ger and a shower of rain, slept soundly until six 
o'clock. In the morning the Regiments were formed 
in double column, at half distance, to guard against 

* It seems that Lieutenant-Colonel I5i ll had received his commission as 
Colonel at Gettysburg; but, owing to the reduced number of his command, 
had not been permitted to be mustered in according to his true rank. This 
was also the case with several other army officers. But by special order of 
the War Department, granted as a favor on account of the gallant conduct 
of the 2d Corps at Auburn and Bristow, the officers in the Corps holding 
such commissions were mustered in their true rank. With characteristic 
modesty, Colonel Bri.L declares that the gallantry of his men gave him his 
cables. 



220 The Adventures of One Thousand Boys in Blue. 

an expected attack from the enemy's cavalry, who, at 
one p. m., advanced to the Run, and fired across with 
artillery, until silenced by our Batteries, while their 
sharp-shooters fired at our officers on horseback. Heavy 
skirmishing went on for some hours until the enemy 
retired from the Run. But all these movemements on his 
part were but a cover to his real proceedings. Heavy 
rains swelled Bull Run and kept Meade on the east side 
of it for some days ; and when, on the 19th, he moved 
out to Bristow Station, he found the railroad destroyed 
to the Rappahannock. This had been the business of 
Lee ever since his defeat at Bristow, on the 14th. 
Having accomplished this, Lee retired behind the 
Rappahannock ; constant skirmishing being kept up 
between our cavalry and his, with various success. 
On the 23d, our army encamped about Warrenton, 
and there awaited the rebuilding of the Orange and 
Alexandria railroad, which was pushed forward with 
great energy. 



Chapter XYTT, 



; HE Army of the Potomac remained at Warrenton 
until the Orange and Alexandria railway was 
rebuilt, and on the 7th of November took up its 
line of march toward the Rappahannock, the 1st, 2d and 
3d Corps forming the left wing, under General French ; 
the 5th and 6th the right wing, Gfeneral Sedgwick 
commanding. Lee's forces were in and around Cul- 
pepper, on the south side of the Rappahannock, with 
outposts at Kelly's Ford on the south bank, and at 
Rappahannock Station on the north bank of the river. 
The leading Corps of our army was the 3d, under 
Birney, and the duty assigned to it was to cross at 
Kelly's Ford. They advanced rapidly, waded the 
river, carried the rifle-pits and other defenses, and 
captured 500 prisoners. The defenses at Rappahan- 
nock Station were still more formidable, consisting of 
forts, redoubts and rifle trenches, constructed and aban- 
doned by our troops some time before. Two thou- 
sand men, under Early, defended these works; but 
they were assailed with such vigor by two Brigades of 
the 6th Corps that they were carried, with a loss to 
the enemy of 1,500 prisoners, four guns, and eight 
battle-Hags. This brilliant opening was, for some rea- 



222 The Adventures of 

son, not followed up ; but our army resumed almost 
their old position between the two rivers. 

[Correspondence op the Ontario County Times.] 

ARMY MATTERS — 126th REGIMENT. 

Brandy Station, Va., November 9, 1863. 

Dear Times — I arrived at Warrenton Junction on the 7th 
inst., found that the army had all moved forward the day previ- 
ous, a sufficient number only being left to guard the supplies at 
Warrenton. The public at Washington and vicinity had received 
not even a hint of the forward movement, so quietly had it taken 
place. I put my baggage on board an army wagon at the Junc- 
tion and marched to Bealton, a distance of six miles, and made 
my head-quarters in the army wagon for the night. In the morn- 
ing at daylight I was awakened by the braying of ten thousand 
mules attached to the wagons belonging to the 5th and 6th Army 
Corps. Soon after I had the pleasure of seeing ten or twelve hun- 
dred rebel prisoners marching in from the Rappahannock Station. 
They were captured by the 6th Corps. The 5th and 6th Corps 
are formed in one Grand Division, under command of General 
Sedgwick ; and the 1st, 2d, and 3d Corps in another Grand Divi- 
sion, under General French. At Bealton I was informed that 
the command of General French was crossing the Rappahan- 
nock, at Kelly's Ford, and as good luck would have it a train of 
ambulances belonging to the 5th Corps was going that way to 
cross, and I obtained permission to ride. On the way we passed 
a body of 700 rebels captured by the 3d Corps at Kelly's Ford. 
I soon arrived at the ford and found the 5th and 6th Corps and a 
portion of the 1st crossing the river. Here I learned that the 
most of French's command were on the march about two miles in 
advance. I hastened onward and overtook them after a march of six 
miles ; found the Regiment in fine condition and eager to over- 
take the Johnnies, as the rebels are ftimiliarly termed, who were 
only two or three miles in advance ; but owing to their fleetness 
on a retreat, we did not come up with them. Our cavalry, how- 
ever, harrassed them, capturing several hundred prisoners. We 
halted for the night at Brandy Station, seven miles from Culpep- 
per. We hear this morning that the rebels are crossing the 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 223 

Rapidan. AVhether we are to follow them further has not yet 
been decided. At the p resent writing, twelve jr., there are no 
signs of a movement. There is a rumor that we are destined for 
Gordonsville, provided the rebels don't interfere with our plans. 
I am informed that there were great rejoicings in the army 
over the State elections, " commissary forty rod " being punished 
pretty severely during the exuberance of joy. 

The 126th Regiment now only numbers about 200 men present, 
and only sixteen officers. They are termed by General Hays the 
iron-clads. Their gallant conduct at Auburn and Bristow has 
been noticed by the War Department and highly commended. 
There is a rumor that they will be sent home to recruit after the 
close of the present campaign. 

The call for dinner has sounded and I must close in order to 
get my share of pork and hard tack. Will write again soon if 
anything of interest occurs. We have just been officially 
informed of the capture by our forces, during the present march, 
of over 2,200 prisoners, seven stand of colors and four pieces of 
artillery. Good enough for the commencement of the campaign. 

Truly yours, 

P D. P 

On the 26th of November Meade became aware 
that Lee's army was already in winter quarters, scat- 
tered widely about the country, the two Divisions of 
Hill and Ewell several miles apart. Also, that the 
lower (eastern) fords of the Rapidan were undefended, 
Lee relying for the defense of his army on some 
strong fortifications on the west side of Mine Run, a 
stream that comes into the Rapidan from the south, a 
dozen miles west of Chancellorsville. Meade con- 
ceived that it would be possible to cross the river by 
these uncovered fords, proceed south far enough to 
turn the right or southern flank of Ewell 1 s force at 
Mine Run, then advance west on the Orange Turn- 
pike, and, having thus cut off E well's from Hill's 



224 



The Adventures of 



Division, attack and defeat each in detail. The plan 
was bold and wise, provided it conld be carried 
through with secrecy and celerity The foe was vigi- 
lant and active, and, on the first discovery of our 
designs, would employ every resource to foil them. 
The problem was, to move the five Corps of an army 
of 60,000 or 70,000 men across different fords, by dif- 
ferent roads, through an unknown country, and to 




Union Lines = 
Confederate do. — 



Scale cfMites 
2 3 4 



MINE RUN. 

have them form their junction at precisely the right 
place and time, without awaking the suspicions of the 
enemy All the Corps had their instructions, and on 
this day, which happened to be "Thanksgiving," all 
started in high hope and spirits. The latter were still 
farther raised when, just as the sun was rising on 
their morning march, Grant's glorious victory over 



O.xe Thousand Boys in Blue. 225 

Bragg at the west was announced to the army. Sixty 
thousand cheers arose, and sixty thousand caps were 
swung for the hero of Chattanooga, 

The first check was at the Rapidan. Not knowing 
what might be encountered on the other side of it, 
Meade was unwilling that one Corps should go over 
alone, and Warren was obliged to wait with the 2d 
Corps three hours for French with the 3d. Then a 
still further delay was caused by discovering that an 
insufficient number of pontoons had been provided for 
the bridge, which had to be lengthened by trestle 
work. Thus nearly a day was lost. The crossing 
effected, Warren 1 s Corps proceeded in a southerly 
course, through dense thickets, along by-roads and 
paths, making all the speed possible, especially the 
last few miles, where it was a race with a Division of 
the enemy for a ridge called Locust Ridge, near 
Robinson's Tavern. Our men won the position, which 
was a commanding one, and the infantry and artillery 
were quickly formed in line, and skirmishers were 
immediately engaged with those of the enemy, who 
were driven to another ridge a mile distant, as night 
came on. The 126th and 12.">th Regiments held the 
skirmish line that night. At daylight next morning, 
the 1st and f>th Corps having arrived, were formed in 
line of battle each side of the :2d Corps, and, as the 
line advanced, the enemy retired to the fortifications 
west of Mine Run. These wore exceedingly fonnid 
able, both by nature and ail. For nearly a mile 
the hills furnished commanding positions for artil- 
lery ; a dense wood was in front, part of which 



226 The Adventures of 

was felled to form an abatis ; Mine Run, which 
ran, from south to north, between their forces and 
ours, though an insignificant stream, had marshy 
borders, grown up to underbrush ; and its banks were 
steep and abrupt. The two armies lay facing each 
other, on the two opposite ridges, through the weary 
winter's day, each apparently waiting the attack of 
the other. Ours were really waiting the arrival of 
French, with the 3d Corps, who had been directed to 
turn the enemy' s flank, and be the first to attack. But 
poor General French had lost his way, and met the 
enemy, and had a pretty severe brush with him. In 
the forenoon there was sharp artillery practice from 
the opposing forces, but during the rest of the 
day the silence was unbroken, save by the musketry 
of the skirmishers, and the crack of the sharp-shoot- 
ers' rifles. That night the 126th were again advanced 
as skirmishers, and so remained until eight next 
morning, when the 2d Corps, with the 3d Division of 
the 6th, were ordered to move south several miles to 
New Hope church, on the plank road, in order to 
turn the enemy's right flank. This was a tremendous 
march "thorough bush and thorough brier," through 
creeks and ravines ; and, with all their expedition, it 
was nightfall when they arrived. A grand attack 
along the whole line had been determined on for 
the following day, the 30th. While, however, our 
tired forces were sleeping, the sleepless foe were 
entrenching, and fortifying, and planting Batteries, 
and massing infantry, and posting cavalry ; besides 
felling trees toward the attacking party, and sharpen- 



One Thousand Bo is in Blue. 227 

ing their limbs, so as to form an almost impenetrable 
abatis in front of their works. On the open space 
that onr troops must cross even to reach this abatis, 
they had concentrated a direct and an enfilading fire 
from several Batteries. Such was the changed posi- 
tion of affairs, when morning revealed the scene. 
Officers and men saw clearly that an attack, even if 
successful, must cost the lives of perhaps half the 
assailants. Yet every man was ready for the assault, 
and there was a keen feeling of disappointment and 
mortification as the day wore on, and no order came 
to advance. It was the brave Warren who assumed 
the responsibility of withholding the order ; and 
Meade, on examining the enemy's position, justified 
his decision.* It would have been only another 
Fredericksburg, with as little hope of success. Morti- 
fying as it was to give up the expedition as a failure,, 
it was doubtless the only course. The failure was 
owing to no defect in plan, and to no lack of bravery 
in officers or men ; but to slowness and delay on the 
part of some of the Corps, which gave the enemy 
ample time to collect his forces from their scattered 
cantonments, and to strengthen his fortifications tc* 
the utmost. That night the 126th went again on 
picket, and the next day passed away in the same 
enforced inactivity, until four p. m., when the Regi- 

* Swinton has a sensational story, that the men, expecting an immediate 
order to attack, and perfectly ready and even eager for it, were yet seen 
each silently pinning to his blouse a bit of paper on which he had written 
his name ! This tacit admission of the hopelessness of the attack deter- 
mined Warren not to give the order. 

This is very pretty, if true; but, unfortunately, it "lacks confirmation."' 

15 



228 The Adventures of 

merit was relieved from picket ; and, at eight o' clock, 
the army commenced its retreat. Their route lay 
through the famous "Wilderness," where numbers of 
them afterward fought and fell, and laid their bones 
in nameless graves ; and re-crossing the Rapidan, they 
reached their old camp in the evening of the 2d of 
December. The Mine Run expedition had been a 
most severe and exhausting one ; unrepaid by the sol- 
dier's best recompense, success.* 

On the 7th of December, 1863, the army went into 
winter quarters on a wooded ridge near Stevensburg, 
a few miles east of Culpepper and southeast of Brandy 
Station. Judging from the diaries and letters of offi- 
cers and men, it must have been an interesting winter 
to the 126th Regiment. At first, their time was taken 
up in stockading tents and building huts. "When 
we first came here," writes Captain Bassett, "a few 
weeks ago, it was a wilderness ; now it is a large 
<city of log huts ; hardty a tree to be seen. The huts 
are built of logs a foot thick, split, and laid up face 
side in. They are about twelve by seven feet, and 
seven feet high, with a door at the end, hung on 

* Lieutenant Lincoln, a brave officer and fighter, says : " I love to speak 
of Meade, for I can only speak of him in terms of the highest praise. As 
soldiers, we love him ; as a brave man, we respect him ; as a cautious and 
humane leader, he has no equal in the army. * * * * I wish all 
the chronic grumblers against his conduct at Mine Run could have been in 
our places on that memorable Monday morning. I would like to have 
given them the command : Forward, march ! Charge bayonets ! Double- 
quick, march ! I think the storm of shot, shell, grape and cannister, and 
the wall of bayonets and pointed sticks that would have met them, would 
not only have lessened their military ardor, but their numbers. * * * 
The man who maligns General Warren had better keep out of the way of 
this Corps ! " 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 229 

a wooden hinge. They have a cloth roof, which serves 
also as a window. The logs are chinked and mudded, 
and in my hut there is a good stove, fire-place and 
chimney, which is topped out with barrels." Much 
ingenuity was expended, and much of that invention 
which is born of necessity, in contriving warming and 
cooking apparatus ; all of which kept up the spirits 
of the soldiers. "My fire-place smokes," writes one 
of them ; "I must add another pork barrel to the top 
of my chimney" Another abstracts a gate from a 
distant farm, which makes "a splendid bedstead." 

On the 20th of January there was an order from the 
War Department to increase the 2d Corps to 50,000 
troops, to be employed in such special service as the 
Department shall think proper ; a compliment to their 
Corps, which the 126th appreciated. The general charge 
of the recruiting service was given to General Hancock. 
Captain Richardson, of Company D, and Sergeant 
Squiers, of Company B, were detailed on recruiting 
service for the 126th Regiment ; and afterwards were 
reinforced by Colonel Bull and Captains Scott and 
Brown. (It may be stated here that tiny succeeded 
in getting very few recruits for the 126th ; young men 
generally preferring the heavy artillery to infantry 
service. The consequence was such a superabundance 
of the hitter troops that they often had to serve in the 
field as infantry, much to their disappointment. 

After the camp was completed, there seems to have 
been much social enjoyment and gayety, owing to the 
presence of a great many ladies. Quarters were quite 
comfortable, although heavy gales sometimes dispersed 



230 The Adventures of One Thousand Boys in Blue. 

the coverings of their "tabernacles," in a summary 
manner. Very interesting views of the surrounding 
country, and of the rebel lines across the river, were 
obtained from the top of Pony Mountain, to which 
point gentlemen and ladies sometimes rode on horse- 
back. 



Chapter XVTTT 



BOUT the 6th of February, 1864, General Butler 
sent a detachment of cavalr}^ to enter the rebel 
capital, then slightly defended, and liberate the 
Union prisoners there. Simultaneously with this move- 
ment, a grand reconnoissance in force was made by 
the Army of the Potomac, with the purpose, as is 
supposed, of diverting Lee's attention from what was 
going on at Richmond. This reconnoissance took 
place at Morton's Ford, on the Rapidan. 

Brigadier- General Owen gives the following report 
of it: 

Head-quarters;, 3d Buioade, ) 
3d Division, 2d Corps, February 9. j 

I have the honor to report that on Saturday, 6th inst., I marched 
my command in the direction of Morton's Ford, in accordance 
with orders received about three hours previous to that time. * * 
At 10.35 I received orders to cross the river, which I succeeded 
in doing, and pushed the enemy hack about half a mile ; and then, 
under orders not to press the enemy too hard, but skirmish 
with him if he felt so disposed, I halted my advance and made 
dispositions to hold the favorable "toiiikI I had taken. In a short 
time the enemy began to concentrate troops in my immediate 
front, and to advance a stronger line of skirmishers. I communi- 
cated this fact to Corps head-quarters, through a signal officer, 
and asked for reinforcements; at 3.]o p. m., Colonels Carrol and 
Piiwuiis reported to me, by order of General Hays, and I masked 
their Brigades (1st and '2d of the 3d Division) under cover from 



232 The Adventures of 

the enemy's fire, and where they could be readily deployed to the 
right or left, as circumstances might require. The enemy kept 
tip a vigorous fire of small arms during the day, and, at intervals, 
a heavy artillery fire from a Battery in position on his left. Fresh 
troops (of the enemy) were constantly arriving in great haste. 
At 5.29 p. m., the enemy opened with a heavy fire from his Bat- 
teries, and shortly afterward advanced and attacked vigorously 
our right and right center ; but it was futile, as under the per- 
sonal supervision of the General commanding the Division, the 
enemy was met and repulsed at all points. At 7.50 I was ordered 
to hold myself in readiness to recross the river, which I did at 
11.30. All the troops behaved well. I am satisfied with the 3d 
Brigade. It will do its duty, and never disgrace the 2d Corps. 
The passage of the river under the enemy's fire I consider worthy 
of special notice ; and I especially mention the good conduct and 
gallant bearing of my Adjutant-General, Captain Robert S. Sea- 
bury, who was the first to cross the river at the head of 300 
picked skirmishers, and to drive the enemy back from the rifle- 
pits, capturing twenty-seven inen and two officers. My loss was 
two officers wounded, and three men killed, and thirty-three 
wounded; which is remarkably light under the circumstances; 
and I believe the enemy suffered much more severely. 

The 39th New York Volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel Hughes ; 
the lllthNew York Volunteers, Colonel Lusk ; the 125th New 
York Volunteers, Colonel Crandell; and the 126th New York 
Volunteers, Colonel James M. Bull, were handled by their 
commanders with skill and judgment, and behaved splendidly. I 
am indebted to Captain Jos. Hyde and Lieutenant P. C. Rogers, 
of my staff, for their prompt and intelligent conveyance of my 
orders to different portions of the line. 

I am, sir, with great respect, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOSHUA T. OWEN, 

Brigadier- General Volunteers. 

We will add extracts from a private letter of Lieu- 
tenant Lincoln, giving further details of this splendid 
affair, written February 9, 1864: "We left camp at 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 233 

seven a. m,, our Brigade leading the Corps. At nine 
a. m. we reached the river, and so sudden was our 
appearance, that before they could gather up their 
things and leave we captured two Lieutenants and 
nearly thirty men. The pontoons had been ordered 
up for us to cross on, but failed to get here in time, 
so in we plunged without regard to rank or station. 
General Hats, with the rest, with an ax assisted in 
clearing away the brush that obstructed the passage. 
The banks of the river were about eight feet high, 
and of a soft, red clay The current of the river was 
very swift, and the bottom very rough. On toward 
the enemy's works, with boots full of water and 
clothes dripping wet, we rushed. When about three- 
fourths of a mile from the ford, we halted, deployed 
our skirmishers, and soon found and engaged the 
enemy- For several hours ours was the only Brigade 
over, and here, with a few hundred men, we were in 
the face of strong breastworks, lined with Batteries 
and well filled with men ; but on went the line up the 
hill toward the enemy's guns, till it rested near them, 
and there, under shot and shell and musketry, we 
held the position till nearly dark, when the rebels 
made a grand charge along nearly the whole line, 
with a force at least five to one ; but our men stood 
their ground manfully, contending for every inch of 
ground, till a fresh Brigade came to their aid, when 
the enemy were checked and ourselves saved from 
annihilation. The river, with its steep banks, swift 
current and difficult crossing, was on two sides of us, 
and the enemy, confident in numbers and position, on 



234 The Adventures of 

the other two. To retreat was destruction ; to hold 
our position our only salvation ; and all understood 
it, and met the charge of the enemy and repulsed it 
handsomely. We had no Batteries over the river, no 
earthworks of any kind, nothing but our strong arms 
and willing hearts to protect us. About dark, while 
the charge was in progress, the remnant of our Regi- 
ment was ordered to reinforce the left of the line. 
The rest of the Regiment, as soon as relieved by the 
2d Brigade, recrossed the river about seven p. m. I 
remained with the other part, where we lay on the 
wet ground, shivering under the effects of the morn- 
ing's bath, and growing wetter by the falling rain, till 
near midnight, when we withdrew across the river 
undiscovered, without a single shot being fired after 
us. When safe on this side, I confess I felt easier 
and breathed more freely We bivouacked for the 
night in the woods, where the water was only about 
ten inches deep. Sunday evening we returned to 
camp. Our loss as a Regiment was two killed, nine- 
teen wounded, two missing, and eight burned with 
powder from the explosion of a shell. A shell broke 
a rail within six inches of my head, and burst within 
two feet of it, killing one, wounding one who was 
lying on my feet and two others, besides burning the 
faces of eight others, myself among them. Three 
grains of powder were blown into my left eye, not 
permanently injuring the sight. * * * I was hug- 
ging the ground closely at the time, a kind of hug- 
ging I do not object to when shells are flying. * * 
Butler's movement up the Peninsula at that time I 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 235 

consider a contemptible fizzle. I have no idea that a 
few trees felled into a river would have stopped us. 
Our crossing at Morton's Ford was obstructed with a 
strong abattis of brush, and rifle-pits filled with 
rebels ; but, with water waist deep, the men plunged 
in, with General Hays on foot, with an ax on his 
shoulder, and in less time than it takes me to write 
it, the brush was cleared, the rebels caught, and some 
of our men were over. Butler, as an executive officer, 
has few superiors, but, &c. * * * Our part was done 
to the satisfaction of General Sedgwick, (temporarily) 
commanding the Army of the Potomac ; at least so 
he said in a General Order of congratulation and 
thanks, and had Butler done his as well, there is a 
strong probability that a general delivery of our pri- 
soners confined in Richmond might have been effected." 

[Extracts from an Official Communication of Colonel James 
Bull to General Owen, Commanding Brigade, February 9, 1864.] 

General. — I have the honor to report that my Regiment left 
camp Saturday morning, 6th inst., at seven o'clock a. m., * * * 
and proceeded to a point about a mile this side of the Rapidan, 
where the Brigade halted and formed in column by Battalion, 
under cover of a piece of woods. At this point 100 men were 
detailed as skirmishers, comprising men of eight Companies with 
their officers, viz. : Companies A, B, D, E, F, II, I and K. This 
detail, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel "William H. Baird, 
with the others from the Brigade, inarched to and crossed the 
Rapidan at Morion's Ford, and took part in capturing about 
thirty rebel prisoners. Immediately after fording the river, the 
skirmishers were deployed as such, and were soon engaged with 
those of the enemy. They continued on duty until relieved about 
seven in the evening, and reerossed the river, under orders, about 
midnight. * * The rest of the Regiment, under my command, 
were employed, toward evening, in strengthening the skirmish 



236 The Adventures of 

line, under Lieutenant-Colonel Baied. * * * It affords me 
pleasure to say that the officers and men of my command, both on 
the march and on the field, behaved in a manner satisfactory to 
me and creditable to themselves. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JAMES M. BULL, 

Colonel Commanding Regiment. 

[ORDER COMPLIMENTARY.] 

Head-quarters Army oe the Potomac, ) 
February 9, 1864. \ 

Major- General G. K. Warren, Commanding 2d Corps: 

General. — The Major-General commanding directs me to 
express to you the great satisfaction he has felt at the prompt and 
handsome manner in which the 2d Corps executed the duties 
assigned to it in the reconnoissance of the 6th and 7th instants, 
and to express his regret at the severe loss it met with in the ope- 
ration. 

(Signed) S. WILLIAMS, 

A. A. G. 

(Official.) 

R. S. Seabury, 

Captain and A. A. G. 

On the 23d of February, there was a grand Review 
of the whole Corps by General Meade. Many dis- 
tinguished persons, military and civil, were present. 
Among them Generals Hancock, Waeeen, Sedgwick, 
Pleas an ton, French, and Kilpateick ; Secretary 
Welles, Gov. Spragtte, and many ladies. It was a 
magnificent display- On the 10th of March the ladies 
were ordered away by General Meade ; an order 
which, it was thought, "meant business." On the 
28th there was a great change in the army organiza- 
tion. The Corps were consolidated and reduced to 
three ; the 5th, 2d and 6th. General Warren 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 237 

was transferred to the command of the 5th Corps, and 
his place in the 2d was filled by General Winfield S. 
Hancock, while General Sedgwick took command of 
the 6th Corps. To the 3d Brigade (of which the 126th 
formed a part) were added three more Regiments ; and 
its place was changed from the 3d to the 1st Division 
of the 2d Corps ; Colonel Paul Frank commanding 
the Brigade, and General Barlow, the youngest 
General in the service (of whom the men said, " he 
neither swears nor drinks"), the Division.* These new 

* We insert here Brigadier-General Owen's farewell address : 

Head-quarters 2d Corps, ) 
March 3d, 1864. J 

Fellow-soldiers of the old M Brigade, Sd Division, 2d Corps : 

Under the new arrangement of the troops of the Army of the Potomac, 
I am assigned, by the General commanding the Corps, to a command in 
which you are not included. I must, therefore, bid you adieu. You are 
endeared to me by your soldierly bearing and good discipline ; your prompt 
obedience of all orders, and especially by your valor in battle. You have 
cause to be proud of your military record. Be as good soldiers in the 
future as in the past, and your new commander will have equal cause to be 
proud of you. Remember, the 2d Corps always conquers, even though it 
has to pluck victory from the very jaws of death. When the war is over, 
and you return to your peaceful homes, your country will honor you as her 
brave defenders. 

I wish you, finally, success and honor. 

Your old commander, 

(Official.) JOSHUA T. OWEN. 

R. S. Seaburt, Captain, A. A. O. 

We also insert General Hays' address, dated March 26th, 1864. 

Soldiers: General Orders No. 11, Corps Head-quarters, temporarily dis- 
solves the old 3d Division, with which you have been so long associated. 
Consolidation was a military necessity to accumulate a power which no 
enemy will be able to resist. 

Although only nine months your commander, we shared together the 
toilsome march and cheerless bivouac; but, within the same short period, 
you have five times triumphed over your enemies. Your former services 
are recorded ; and to them you have added Gettysburg, Auburn, Bristow, 



238 The Adventures of One Thousand Boys in Blue. 

arrangements resulted from the fact that, on the 2d of 
March, 1864, General U. S. Grant had been confirmed 
in the United States Senate as Lieutenant- General in 
the army of the United States. The only person in 
the country who had borne this rank before was 
"Washington, at whose death the rank was discon- 
tinued. Major-General Meade still continued to com- 
mand the "Army of the Potomac," but no longer 
had the sole responsibility of directing its campaigns. 
He, as well as all the other commanders of the Grand 
Divisions of the army, were to be guided by one 
head, which, fortunately, was a wise one. There was 
hope, now that concert of action was secured in the 
various branches of the service, that some grand 
result would follow. But those that expected it to 
follow immediately, were doomed to disappointment. 
Nearly twelve months were to roll away before the 
desired end should be attained. 

Locust Grove, and Morton's Ford. You have distinguished yourselves, not 
only by your courage on the field of battle, but by evidences of your loyalty 
to your country and subordination to the discipline imposed upon you. 

It is trying to the soldier to part with the badge associated with his long 
service, and to see furled the banner under which there was always victory. 
But it is a sacrifice exacted by your country. 

It is my sincere hope and expectation that, within a brief period of time, 
the " Old Division " will be reorganized, and the blue trefoil will once more 
wave over you. Until then your banner will be sacredly preserved, and 
restored to you ; or, otherwise, will be deposited where it will be a memento 
to the nation of your triumphs and your sacrifices. 

ALEX. HAYS, 
Brigadier-General, Volunteers. 



HAPTEF^ X X 



,HE 126th Regiment, which left Geneva in August 
1862, one thousand strong, had now been reduced 
by the casualties of the service to less than 300 
men. Of these, one hundred, namely, two commissioned 
Officers, five Sergeants, eight Corporals and eighty- 
seven men, were, on the fifth of April, 1864, detailed 
to act as provost guard at head-quarters. The officers 
of this guard were Captain Richard A. Bassett 
and First Lieutenant Ten Eyck Munson ; and it 
was as active, intelligent and well-drilled a body of 
young men as could be found in the army The 
business of the provost guard, especially of its Cap- 
tain and Marshals, was to follow in the rear of the 
army, arrest stragglers, take charge of rebel prisoners, 
punish offenders, guard trains, confiscate property, 
and be ready for any special service required by the 
superior officers. 

Drills, reviews and picket duty occupied the men 
through March and April. The reviews were very 
splendid, being held in the presence of superior offi- 
cers and strangers of distinction, many of whom were 
ladies. Whole Brigades of men went out on picket, 
and wen? often out three or four days. 

In the early part of May occurred a gale of unusual 



240 The Adventures of 

violence, which is mentioned in all the diaries and 
letters written at the time. Its appearance, as it 
approached, was ' ' like a fiery red cloud, without 
rain, licking up all before it ; its sound like the rum- 
bling of vast trains of cars. The air, as it struck the 
camp, was filled with dust and sparks of fire ; and 
the coverings of half the tents in the Regiment were 
taken off by it." The gale continued for three-quar- 
ters of an hour, and was followed by moderate rain. 
May, 1864, found Major-General Geant in command 
of all the armies of the United States, consisting, 
nominally, of a million of men, and vast amounts of 
"materiel" for carrying on the war.* For the first 

* The Evening Post, with its usual perspicacity and foresight, spoke of the 
appointment of General Grant (in its issue of March 15th, 1864), in the fol- 
lowing terms : 

" An important General Order has been issued by the President of the 
United States. General Grant having been commissioned as Lieutenant- 
General, according to the expectation of Congress in framing its late enact- 
ment concerning that office, the command of the armies of the United States 
has been assigned to him. The country will learn with satisfaction that this 
arrangement is not to withdraw him from active service in that quarter 
of the United States in which he has so honorably distinguished himself, 
since, as the General Order expresses it, hereafter " the head-quarters of the 
army will be at Washington, and with General Grant in the field." The 
happy combination of cautious foresight with promptness, enterprise and 
daring, which the country has come to attribute to General Grant's mili- 
tary character, joined to the extraordinary good fortune which has attended 
for the most part his military operations, will cause this new arrangement to 
be looked upon with great favor by the people, and to be received by them, 
as a new symptom of the speedy termination of the war. * * * 

The position of Lieutenant-General is one which demands a combination 
of qualities in him who occupies it, vastly superior to what is required in 
the commander of an army Corps, or even of a military department. It 
requires the power of looking with a clear vision through a far larger num- 
ber of conspiring circumstances to their final and necessary result. It 
requires a capacity of framing a number of subordinate plans into a general 
system, in which all of them shall be effectually executed, and neither of 
them interfere with any other. Besides this, it demands the skill to vary 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 241 

time, all the Grand Divisions of the vast army were 
to co-operate in the great work of subduing the rebel- 
lion. East of the Mississippi, Shekman was to com- 
mand the forces opposed to Johnson, while the Army 
of the Potomac was to be under the immediate com- 
mand of Meade. Grant, who well knew the skill 
and prowess of Lee, and his wonderful fertility in 
resources, accompanied the Potomac Army, and 
advised its movements. His plan was a simple one. 
To follow Lee. To make his army the objective 
point, and move upon him wherever he might be. 
Butlee, on the James, was to threaten th« rebel 
capital, and prevent reinforcements to Lee's army 
from the Carolinas. Sigel, in northwestern Virginia, 
was, if possible, to destroy railway communications 
with Tennessee. All Divisions were to be in motion 
about the first of May 

Accordingly, while Sherman, with the combined 
armies of the Cumberland, Tennessee, and the Ohio, 
advanced from Chatanooga, the Army of the Potomac 
broke up its winter quarters around Culpepper, and 
marched toward the Rapidan. Knowing Lee to be 
strongly posted on the south side of that river, toward 
the westward, and that the lower or eastern fords 

these plans on the instant, as new and unlookcd for events arise, and to suit 
every change so made to the emergency, in such a manner as not to disor- 
der the general scheme of the war. 

The responsibility to which General Grant has been advanced is, there- 
fore, of immense magnitude. The country has been taught by his successes 
to hope everything of him, and we arc certain that there will be no lack of 
endeavor on his part to justify the confidence it reposes in him. The activity 
of his temperament assures us at least of one thing, that the army, under his 
command, will never be permitted to be idle in any part of the country. 



242 The Adventures of 

were unguarded, Grant decided on a flank movement 
which should turn the confederate right. His plan 
was to cross the eastern fords ; march directly 
through L ' the wilderness " "by a road that crosses it 
from north to south ; reach the Orange plank road 
and Orange turnpike ; then strike west by those 
roads, and place his army between the rebels and 
their Capital, and thus command the approaches to it. 
This desolate region called "the wilderness," lies west 
of Chancellorsville, is about fifteen miles in extent 
each way, and well deserves its name. The whole 
tract is seamed with veins of iron ore, which for 
scores of years have been Avorked, the earth being dug 
up in every direction for the ore, and the forest trees 
felled for fuel for the furnaces. The uncultivated soil 
has sent up masses of dwarf oaks, dwarf pines, scrubby 
plants, tangled vines and whortleberry bushes, where 
the most experienced guide would be apt to lose his 
way ; and even the hunter can scarce penetrate the 
thickets. The land lies rather high, but is broken into 
ridges, between which swampy streams find their way 
to the Rapidan on the north and the Mattapony on the 
south. Here and there a house with a small clearing 
around it occurs ; an oasis in the desert. But the 
feature of greatest interest to the armies was the sys- 
tem of roads that traverse it. Two roads cross it from 
northwest to southeast, uniting near Spottsylvania 
Court-house ; and two parallel ones run from east to 
west, one known as the Orange plank road, and the 
other, the old turnpike. The latter roads cross the 
others nearly at right angles. 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 243 

It would, perhaps, have been impossible for Lee, 
scattered as his army was, successfully to oppose the 
passage of our army across the Rapidan. At all 
events, he did not attempt it, and on the 5th of May 
Grant congratulated himself that at least 100,000 men 
and the vast train of 4,000 wagons was safely across 
that stream. The 2d Corps (Hancock's), who had 
crossed at Ely's Ford, pushed on to Hooker's old 
battle-ground at Chancellorsville, where they bivou- 
acked for the night. They had encountered scarcely 
any opposition, and no enemy was before them. All 
they had to do was to march through the inhospitable 
tract in which they found themselves (by way of the 
roads above mentioned) to Spottsylvania Court-house ; 
then move rapidly west toward Gordonsville, and 
either attack Lee there in flank, or compel him to 
hasten to defend his capital. But alas for the "best 
laid schemes" of man. Instead of an uninterrupted 
march southward and westward, our army was here 
to encounter dangers and pass through scenes of blood 
and fire that would make the very name of the wil- 
derness a ' ' word of fear ' ' in all coming time. For 
Lee had his plans, as well as Grant ; and they were 
based on an intimate knowledge of the territory to be 
traversed, and a shrewd guess, assisted, perhaps, by 
secret information, at the designs of our commander. 
He offered no opposition to our advance into the wil- 
derness, but formed the bold design of bringing up 
his forces from the west, and attacking Grant's army 
in flank when it should be stretched out in line, and 

16 



244 The Adventures of 

so cutting off our advanced troops from those in the 
rear. 

The former part of the design he executed. Even 
while our army was crossing the Rapidan on the pon- 
toon bridges, Lee was hurrying up his forces from 
their distant cantonments, in order to shut Grant up 
in the wilderness. 

We shall attempt no description of the bloody three 
days, from May 4th to May 7th. Instead of fulfilling 
his design of marching rapidly through the inhospi- 
table tract into which he had entered unopposed, 
Grant found himself attacked in flank, first by the 
van of Lee's army under Ewell, afterward by suc- 
cessive Divisions rapidly brought forward from their 
distant posts, and engaging the different Corps of our 
army at every point of their onward progress. There 
was no chance for regular warfare ; the almost impe- 
netrable jungle opposed the advance of a column of 
men. The enemy, who knew the ground as our men 
did not, fought like Indians, delivering their fire and 
retreating to cover, or pouring deadly volleys from 
behind trees, rocks and ridges of earth. On the part 
of the Union men there was no "flinching. They knew 
they were shut in this dreadful trap, and that return 
was impossible, even had they desired it, and that 
their only course was to fight their way through as 
best they might. Artillery, too, was useless where 
men could not see ten rods ahead. Lee gained none 
of the advantage he had expected from attacking in 
flank, for our men faced about and met the foe at 
every point, often driving them and sometimes being 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 245 

driven. The losses in killed, wounded and prisoners 
were fearful. The small but gallant remnant of the 
126th was again decimated. Alex. Hays and a large 
number of other field officers fell. No officer could be 
more regretted by the (old) 3d Brigade than General 
Hays, whose men followed him from love to his per- 
son and faith in his success.* To add to the horrors 
of carnage the woods took fire, and many of the dead, 
and possibly some of the severely wounded, were 
burned where they fell.f The rebels, too, lost heavily,. 

* Of the death of this General, Coppee says : " There was a temporary 
break in our line. Into this, with characteristic impetuosity, rushed 
Brigadier-General Alexander Hats, with the 2d Brigade of Birney'& 
Division, to repair it. He was shot dead while gallantly leading his com- 
mand into the thickest of the fight. * * * To ardent patriotism General 
Hays added the noble ambition of an educated and experienced soldier. 
Frank, brave, quick and energetic, he was the model of a commander. His 
men loved him, and followed him because he not only commanded but led 
them; and although not in the highest position, we sustained no greater 
loss on that day than that of the noble Hays." 

f As a specimen of the terrible experience of " the Wilderness," we give 
one soldier's narrative of what happened to him there. It was taken from 
his own lips, and is confirmed by other witnesses. The soldier's name is 
James P. Fulton, Company F, 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 
A bullet entered his knee, and splitting the thigh bone came out at the 
hip. He, with about 300 others, after lying twenty-four hours in the 
woods, were carried about a mile from the burning forest and laid down. 
While lying there a tall rebel, seemingly a Texan, came up to Fulton and 
demanded his money. Fulton told him he must help himself to what 
little he had, as he was wounded too badly to aid him (or resist him). He 
then demanded his watch. Fulton told him he had none; but the fellow 
chose to search him, and in doing so came across his diary. Fulton begged 
hard for this, urging that it could be of no possible use to his captor, but 
the latter coolly took it, saying he guessed he would like to read it. (It is- 
a curious fact, that the rebels always stole diaries and photographs if they 
could get a chance.) Fulton had on a new, warm jacket, just sent from 
home. The rebel said he must have that. Fulton said, " No ! not while I 
have life will you get that," "That is pretty talk," said the Texan; " do 
you know you are my prisoner?" " Yes," said Fulton, " I know I am, but 
I am a prisoner of war and have a right to honorable treatment," Just then 



246 The Adventures of 

especially in officers ; Longstreet, among others, 
dreadfully wounded, through mistake, by his own 
men, and so lost to the service for many months. 
Saturday morning found both armies entrenched, but 
neither seemingly disposed to attack the other. Both 
commanders seem to have had the same design, to 
proceed to Spottsylvania Court-house. Grant, in pur- 
suance of his purpose to cut off Lee from his Capital, 
Lee, seeming to penetrate Grant's design, and deter- 
mined to thwart it. The two armies moved on parallel 
roads, but some of Lee's forces reached the point a 
few minutes in advance of ours, and immediately com- 
menced fortifying themselves. On the march, which 
continued through Saturday afternoon and Sunday, 
there were several encounters between the different 
Divisions of the armies. "Lee, turning aside and 
delivering sharp blows, which were returned with inte- 
rest." The weather was intensely hot, which increased 
the fatigue of our men ; yet at Alsop's farm, parts of 
the 5th and 6th Corps drove the rebels and captured 
1,500 men. A Brigade of Hancock's Corps also gained 
a splendid advantage at Corbyn's Bridge ; and Burn- 
side on the 9th, drove a Division across the Ny On 

Fulton saw a knot of rebel officers, and said to the Texan, " Do you see 
those men ?" The Texan looked over his shoulder, and started off on the 
•double-quick. When the officers approached, Fulton asked them if they 
allowed their men to rob wounded prisoners. They said they did not, but 
it would happen sometimes. 

Fulton and his companions were removed three miles farther, and laid 
•upon the ground, shelterless, and so lay six long weeks ! exposed to the sun 
by day and the chills of night, visited by Surgeons occasionally, and sup- 
plied sometimes with drink and coarse food. Can we wonder that most of 
the 300 died? Fulton said, "It was pretty rough; but I thought I 
wouldn't die and I didn't!" But he is crippled for life. 



Oxe Thousand Boys ix Blue. 247 

Tuesday, the 10th, the enemy was entrenched at Spott- 
sylvania ; our line was complete ; a dense forest cov- 
ered our front ; batteries protected us on the right and 
left. Several assaults were made upon the enemy's 
position, but it was found too strong to be forced. 
But in the afternoon, the gallant Colonels Upton and 
Russell, made a successful charge, and took 1,000 
prisoners. The situation may be understood by 
Gr rant's despatch to the Secretary of War, dated 
May 11th, 1864. It reads thus : 

" We have now ended the sixth day of very heavy fighting. 
The result, to this time, is much in our favor. Our losses have 
been heavy. * * * And I think those of the enemy 
must be greater. We have taken over 5,000 prisoners by battle, 
while he has taken from us few, except stragglers. 

" I PROPOSE TO FIGHT IT OUT ON THIS LINE, IF IT TAKES ALL 
SUMMER." 

The last sentence has too much the ring of true 
metal to be lost, and has passed into a proverb. 

The morning of Thursday, the 12th, was veiled in 
fog. The 2d Corps was formed in two lines, having 
Barlow's Division (in which was the 120th Regiment) 
in the center, ployed by Battalions, in double columns,, 
at half distance. The daring project of this Corps 
was to storm a salient angle of earthworks, hold by 
Johnson's Division of E well's Corps. In silence the 
lines were formed; in silence they passed through the 
dense forest, until, with a storm of cheers, they 
reached and scaled the enemy's works, and captured 
Edward Johnson's entire Division, with its com- 
mander; two Brigade's of other troops, with Brigadier- 
General Stewart; and thirty guns. The gallant 



248 The Adventures of 

Adjutant Lincoln, of the 126th, shall tell the story - 
He was one of the first to get inside their works, and, 
with some of his men, wheel around a gun shotted 
and aimed at us, and send its iron messengers full 
into the ranks of its former owners. His penciled 
letter is dated, on the battle-field, May 13th, 1864 : 

" We have been fighting six days, and are nearly all worn out, 
but we have the satisfaction of knowing that the rebels are as 
badly off as we. They had over thirty guns in position behind 
formidable works. The 6th Corps charged them a day or two 
since unsuccessfully. Night before last (the 11th) we were taken 
from our position and marched all night, and formed in line just 
at daylight. Now the old 2d Corps were to try their mettle 
again. Just as day was breaking, we moved on their works, 
formed in double column, at half distance. So surprised were 
they that some of their artillery men were killed in their works. 
Some were cooking, and some were asleep. We scaled their 
works, under a pretty heavy fire, captured over thirty guns, four 
Generals, and about 7,000 prisoners.* Within three minutes 
from the time we got into their works we had their guns turned 
against them. From this time until dark last night we fought 
terrifically, without five minutes cessation. Our loss has been 
very heavy, but theirs greater. We now have in our Regiment 
eight officers and seventy-two men fit for duty (this does not 
include the provost guard) ; but we are in the best of spirits, and 
ready to attack them again. Keep praying for our success, and 

* Writing on the battle-field, in the first flush of triumph, an over-state- 
ment of our success was natural. Four thousand prisoners and two officers 
were captured. These officers were Edwaed Johnson and Brigadier-Gene- 
ral Geo. H. Stewart. " When Hancock heard that these Generals were 
taken, he directed that they should be brought to him. Offering his hand 
to Johnson, that officer was so affected as to shed tears, declaring he would 
have preferred death to captivity. Hancock then extended his hand to 
Stewart whom he had known before, saying : ' How are you Stewart ? ' 
But the rebel, with great haughtiness, replied : ' I am General Stewart, of 
the confederate army, and, under present circumstances, I decline to take 
your hand.' ' And, under any other circumstances, General, I should not 
have offered it.' " [Grant and his Campaigns, p. 313, by Coppee.] 



PLANor the BATTLE 

AND LINES 

Sfqttsylvania 

RTWOUSE 



Foil,/ fit MimX 1 ?'- f/*J /S64 J^k? 

J* 

• icu/r. o/Jftles. J 

' .■i-.*:-*-V/. 




One Thousand Boys in Blue. 249 

we will keep fighting for it. With a very few slight checks, we 
have whipped them every time. It would have done your heart 
good to have heard us yell and hurrah. To-day Btjrnside makes 
an attack on them. Borrow no trouble about me, for I am stand- 
ing it as well as the best. We are engaged this morning in get- 
ting our Division together, and preparing for another blow. Six 
or eight stands of colors were taken yesterday. Ewell's, their 
crack Corps, was opposed to us. 

" Your brother, 

"S. F. Lincoln. "* 

Hancock was naturally in great spirits. His pen- 
ciled dispatch was : "I have finished up Johnson, 
and am now going into Eaelt." He stormed and 
took the second line of rifle-pits ; but the enemy, who 
had been surprised in the morning, made such despe- 
rate resistance, that other Divisions of the army were 
called up to Hancock's assistance, and the battle 
became general. The charges of our men were despe- 
rate, and seemingly irresistible ; but the enemy's 
position was impregnable. Fourteen hours the carnage 
raged, and the losses on each side must have been at 
least 10,000. General Meade's commendatory order to 
his troops, dated May 13th, shows what work had 
been achieved. We give extracts: "Soldiers! The 
moment has arrived when your commanding General 
feels authorized to address you in terms of congratula- 
tion. For eight days and nights, almost without 

* We should have mentioned, in its place, tliat Captain Winfield Scott, 
whose wound, received at Maryland Heights, had never healed, commanded 
the 120th Regiment, together with the l'J5tli (which had been commanded 
by Lieutenant-Colonel Mykrs until his death), throughout the battles of 
the Wilderness, Po River, Todd's Tavern, and Spottsylvania Court-house, 
where he was hit over the breast by a ball. He owed his life to having on 
two blouses and a testament in his side pocket, which broke the force of 
the ball. 



250 The Adventures of 

intermission, in rain and sunshine, you have lbeen 
gallantly fighting a desperate foe, in positions natu- 
rally strong, and rendered doubly so by intrenchments. 
You have compelled him to abandon his fortifications 
on the Rapidan ; to retire, and attempt to stop your 
onward progress ; and now he has abandoned the last 
position so tenaciously held, suffering a loss of eigh- 
teen guns, twenty-two colors and eight thousand 
prisoners, including two general officers. * * 
We shall soon receive reinforcements, which he can- 
not expect," &c, &c. (It is refreshing to read these 
brave and hopeful utterances of our suffering soldiers 
in the field, in contrast with the whining and fault- 
finding articles of the leaders in the army of critics at 
home. ) 

As a historian remarks : ' ' Our army was now out 
of the woods," literally as well as metaphorically 
Grant and Lee had measured strength, and seem to 
have understood each other. Lee found in Grant no 
rash, spasmodic leader, risking all on the results of a 
battle, and retiring after ill success, to try other plans ; 
but a persistent, determined foe, whom no amount of 
resistance would compel to abandon his fixed purpose. 
The Army of the Potomac was now to follow Lee. 
To fight him wherever found ; to flank him if pos- 
sible ; to beat him in pitched battle if possible ; but in 
any event to make him and his army the "objective 
point." In short, " continuous hammering " as Grant 
called it, was to be the new order of things in the 
Potomac army Meade, too, with Grant, instead of 
a council of war, to advise and direct him, was found 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 251 

to be what Grant called him, "the right man in the 
right place." Grant found in Lee an equal in cour- 
age, determination and persistency, and possibly a 
superior in tactical manoeuvres. This, however, can- 
not be known, since it must not be forgotten that in 
forming his plans Lee had the immense advantage of 
knowing the ground, which to our leaders was foreign 
soil ; terra incognita. Had the position of the two 
commanders been reversed, this circumstance would 
probably have given to Grant that appearance of 
superior skill now enjoyed by the rebel leader. 
Another element of success possessed by Lee was the 
intelligence he constantly received from traitorous 
informers, of every plan of his antagonist. Humili- 
ating as this statement is, there is every evidence of 
its truth. 

To give a glimpse of the life of our heroes during 
the months of May, June and July, 1864, we quote 
some passages from Doctor Hoyt's diary : 

May 16, 1864. — No fighting to-day. Wounded looked up and 
sent off. Twenty-four thousand new troops joined lis to-day. 

May 18. — Battle opened this morning at sunrise, on the right. 
Our Corps engaged. Up to this time (noon) 300 wounded were 
brought to our Division Hospital. 

May. 21. — At eleven o'clock last evening our whole Corps was 
put in motion ; at daylight crossed the Fredericksburg and 
Richmond railroad, a short distance above Guiness Station. Our 
course then lay south, through a fine cultivated country. Passed 
Bowling Green, and at two reached Milford Station. Crossed the 
Mattapony river and went into camp, having marched twenty-four 
miles since breaking camp. Our Corps has been strengthened by 
10,000 men from the heavy artillery. Our movement is evidently 
made to flank Lee, by seizing and holding Hanover Junction. 
Weather intensely hot. * * * 



252 The Adventures of 

May 23. — At daylight the whole army put in motion. At three 
p. m. arrived at the North Anna river ; found Lee strongly 
intrenched on the other side, at Hanover Junction. At six p. m. 
cannonading commenced; the fiercest I ever heard, not even 
excepting Gettysburg. Grant seems determined to force the 
river before night sets in. Our line of battle must extend six or 
eight miles. While the cannonading is going on, sharp musketry 
rings along the whole line. At twilight no cessation; the firing 
continues fiercer than ever ; the air seems filled with shot and 
shell. Established Division hospital to-day, to rear of line about 
one and one-half miles. The day has been intensely hot, and the 
troops have suffered greatly. 

May 24. — Heavy fighting all day. Our entire army crossed the 
river during the day. Banks steep ; crossing effected with great 
difficulty. In the p. m. cannonading very heavy. At night all 
the wounded sent off to "Washington. We have communication 
across the river by a pontoon bridge. 

May 25.— Division hospital at Mr. Hackett's house. Across 
the river lies the Major Doswell farm of 1,200 acres. The line 
of battle of our Corps, in full view, extends over this farm. We 
form the extreme left of the army. The troops are strongly 
posted in rifle-pits ; and Batteries are mounted along the whole 
line. Some of the heavy guns are on this side of the river. 
During the day our forces destroyed the railroad bridge over the 
North Anna, and tore up the track for miles to our rear toward 
Milford Station. 

May 26. — At six p. m. the rebels made a fierce attack on our 
pickets on the right, but were driven back, and at seven our whole 
picket line was attacked. Fierce fighting for an hour, when 
darkness closed the conflict. 

May 27. — To-day our whole Corps re-crossed the North Anna, 
and took position behind the earthworks there, &c, &c. 

June 3, 1863. — At daylight the battle (of Cold Harbor) opened 
furiously along the whole line. The fighting in the 2d and 5th 
Corps was the most obstinate of the campaign. The loss of the 
whole army to-day is not much less than 5,000. At dark the 
enemy made a desperate attack on our Corps, charging the rifle- 
pits. They were met by canister, musketry and grape, and driven 
back with terrible slaughter. 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 253 

June 13. — Rumor says we are to cross the Chickahominy, and 
make the James river our base. Passed St. Peter's Church, 
where Washington was married. The altar is still standing. 
The church has been used as head-quarters, and is much dilapi- 
dated. 

June 15. — Continued the line of march, after crossing the 
Chickahominy, and encamped at three a. m. on the north bank of 
the James, four miles from Charles City Court-house. 

June 16. — Crossed the James, and arrived at Petersburg ; put 
hospitals in order for the wounded. 

June 17. — Terrible fighting all day; victory for us. 

June 18. — Battle opened again. This has been one of the 
hardest fought battles of the war. Losses in the 2d Corps alone 
not much short of 3,500. 

June 21. — The Corps moved south. At noon met the ambu- 
lance train, with sick and wounded. Put up tents, dressed 
wounds and encamped for the night. 

June 22. — Our hospital is five miles from Petersburg, and four 
from the Weldon railway. Captain Morris Brown killed. 

July 2. — Hottest day of the season. Water very scarce. 

July 5th to 10th. — Cannonading heavy. Our forces engaged 
in building earthworks. News of rebel invasion of the north. 

July 12. — Last night received orders to move our hospital 
without delay. We had over 200 sick. Sent 100 to City Point. 

July 16. — During the week all the heavy fortifications which 
we have captured in front of Petersburg have been leveled t o 
the ground. 

July 24. — Have had a fine rain, and the weather is cooler. 

July 26 to 30 — Contains an account of the expedition to 
Deep Bottom. 

July 30, 31. — Account of the blowing up of the fort. Twelve 
thousand pounds of powder were used in the mine. 

But we are anticipating events, and must retrace 
our steps. 



p 



HAPTEF^ XX 



fUR plan in these simple details, which do not 
aspire to the dignity of history, has "been to fol- 
low the fortunes of the 126th Regiment, omitting 
those operations, however interesting, in which that 
Regiment bore no part. Therefore we must pass 
with little notice the co-operative movements set on 
foot by the Union commander, in furtherance of his 
grand design : such as Sigel's operations in 
Western Virginia, splendidly conceived, but ending 
in disaster; Butler's large demonstrations, promising 
a final check to Beauregard, but ending in what 
he called his own effectual "bottling up" at Bermuda 
Hundred ; Kautz' raid, brilliant, but of no special ser- 
vice; and even Sheridan's magnificent and extremely 
serviceable exploits with his cavalry, destroying 
millions of confederate property, and rescuing from 
the enemy many of our prisoners, who otherwise would 
have been doomed to the horrors of southern prisons. 
Fascinating as are these details, our limits will not 
allow us to dwell on them. As a final result of the 
movements of Sigkl, Butler, and Kautz, Lee was 
reinforced by 15,000 men ; and Beauiikoard's troops, 
very few of whom won? necessary for a cork to General 
Butler's " bottle," were free to operate against Grant. 



256 The Adventures of 

The exhaustion of the troops, and the condition of 
the roads, made it necessarj^ to remain quiet for a 
season, and the time was spent in caring for the sick 
and wounded. Many Surgeons and their assistants 
had been sent by the Sanitary and Christian Commis- 
sions, by the way of Acquia creek, and truly they 
were ministers of mercy to the sufferers. 

On the 20th of May, General Grant, perceiving that 
the enemy was determined to await an attack behind 
his works, resolved upon another step in advance 
which should place his army between Lee and Rich- 
mond. Sheridan, under General Grant's orders, had, 
by the 25th of May, seized the ferry at Hanover town, 
fifteen miles from Richmond, and thrown a pontoon 
bridge across the Pamunkey, over which the grand 
army passed on the 27th and 28th of May Next 
came the heavy skirmish at Tolopotomoy creek, a 
point which Sheridan held all day against vast num- 
bers, his men suffering heavily, until Hancock with 
the brave 2d Corps came up, relieved Sheridan, and 
drove the enemy to the other side. This was on the 
30th of May At about five o'clock of that day, 
Warren's advance was violently attacked by a Divi- 
sion of E well's Corps. " Hancock instantly advanced 
Barlow, whose Division had skirmished all day, to 
the attack, drove away the enemy's skirmishers, cap- 
tured their rifle-pits, and held them all night in spite 
of the enemy's midnight attack to recapture them." 
Here the bravery of many of the 126th was signally 
distinguished. Sergeant Green, for example, carried a 
number of dispatches to the commanding General in the 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 257 

rear ; under the direct range of the enemy' s infantry, 
who made him a target for a shower of minnie 
bullets every time he passed and repassed. The 
same Sergeant recovered the body of a comrade, 
Charles Wheeler, killed in the early part of 
the day, and the Chaplain buried him with suitable 
services. This was the second brave soldier of the 
name of Charles Wheeler which the Regiment 
lost, the first having been killed at Gettysburg, and 
buried with the funeral honors he deserved, at his 
home in Canandaigua, New York. "During this 
skirmish, Colonel Baird, wishing to encourage and 
personally direct his men at a time which seemed to 
him a critical one, put spurs to his horse, an iron 
grey, and ran the gauntlet of the rebel bullets which 
flew in a shower around him, to the very front line, 
surveyed the position, gave his orders, and returned 
safely to his post." 

Many brave men of the 126th were killed or wounded 
on this 30th of June. Lieutenant Lincoln says; "It 
is rather a sad sight to look upon our little band when 
they are drawn up in line for an advance, or for the 
deadly charge. Small in number, but as brave hearts 
as ever beat in human breasts. One hundred and 
twenty of our Regiment lie between this and the 
Rapidan, or suffer from wounds in the hospitals. The 
Sanitary Commission are hard at work, and endear 
themselves to every one by their benevolent deeds. 
Lonostkeet is in our front; we like to meet 7ii//i, but 
it has generally been our lot to tight Ewkll." At 
two o'clock of the 30th \Yakiu:n was violently 



258 The Adventures of 

attacked, and as usual Hancock came to the rescue. 
Barlow, with his Division, (the 126th included,) drove 
away the enemy's skirmishers, captured their rifle-pits, 
and held them all night although the enemy made a 
fierce fight for their recapture. Lee's force was now 
disposed so as to cover the Chickahominy, Richmond, 
and the Virginia Central railroad. Grant, designing 
to move his whole army to the left, dispatched 
Sheridan in advance to secure Cold Harbor. 

At this point, which was merely a junction of rail- 
roads, occurred, on the following day, one of the 
deadliest "battles of the war. Our whole army and 
that of Lee, lay confronting each other in nearly par- 
allel lines, ours stretching from Cold Harbor, where 
Hancock's Corps was posted, to Bethesda Church on 
our right, occupied by the 9th Corps, under Burn- 
side. It seems that nothing but the necessity of secur- 
ing this point for the crossing of the Chickahominy, 
would have induced General Grant to offer battle 
here ; for it was on his part an assault along his 
whole line against an enemy partially intrenched. All 
that desperate valor could do was done in the short 
period that the battle lasted. In spite of a tremen- 
dous artillery fire, the Divisions of Gibbon and Bar- 
low attacked with such impetuosity as to push the 
enemy back from his first to his second line of works ; 
but before the 126th, which, with some other troops, 
had been held in reserve, could second the attack, a 
terrible enfilading fire drove our troops from the works 
they had carried ; not so swiftly, however, says Cop- 
pee, but that they carried with them 300 prisoners 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 259 

and one color. Again and again the enemy assaulted 
the left, "but were repulsed. All agree that the vete- 
ran 2d Corps maintained its reputation on this bloody 
day* On the next day, June 4th, the armies still 
confronted each other, and ours had slightly intrenched 
itself. During the following night, Lee took the 
offensive, and made a terrific "but unsuccessful assault 
upon the 2d, 6th and 18th Corps. The diaries and 
letters of our men represent this night battle as one of 
the most magnificent sights that could be imagined ; 
the darkness lighted up by incessant flashes, and the 
stillness invaded by the deadly roar of musketry and 
the awful thunder of artillery During these days our 
lines lay so close to those of the enemy that the 
sharp-shooters, from their trenches, kept up their mur- 
derous work, picking off officers and men without 
mercy Attacks from the enemy on the 5th and on 
the night of the 6th were repelled ; but all this time 
and up to the 7th, the dead and helpless wounded 
lay unburied and uncared for between the lines. 
Surely, of all war's horrors, this is one of the most 
fearful. Captain Richardson writes: "June 6. — 
The fighting continues every day with artillery, 
infantry and cavalry Charges and counter-charges 
have been frequent, and a most murderous fire on 
picket and skirmish lines, by sharp-shooters and oth- 
ers. I instructed my pickets not to fire except in case 

* A correspondent speaks of Hancock's command, the famous 2d Corps, 
■which is reputed to have taken more prisoners than any other in the Army 
of the Potomac, and never to have lost a single gun or flag.— [Rebellion 
Record.] 

17 



260 The Adventures of 

of an advance, and the consequence was that yester- 
day afternoon my line was selected to open a commu- 
nication from General Grant to General Lee in rela- 
tion to the wounded." "This was on the 5th, but it 
was not until the 7th that an armistice was obtained 
in which to bury the dead or bring off the wounded, 
and most of the latter died." "On this occasion," 
writes Adjutant Lincoln, "the men on both sides 
came out of their lines and conversed together. We 
are only about three rods apart, but every man is 
sunk below the surface of the ground, and thus com- 
paratively safe. The Battery we had nearly mined, 
the rebels have drawn off. Night before last we had 
an after dark bombardment, and as we were a few 
rods out of range, we enjoyed it much. Our artillery 
is more than a match for theirs ; our mortars play 
havoc with them. 

' ' We are living well now ; better than ever before 
while engaged in a campaign. Lieutenant Geddis is 
now Captain. The weather is extremely warm and 
sultry- We are on McClellan's old battle-ground, 
near Gaines' Mill. * * * Each man has a 
hole dug, six feet long, two feet wide, and two feet 
deep. I wish you might see how we manage to get 
up to the rebs. It won't do for me to describe it." 
(This method was to dig the earth away in front of 
them as they lay; using for the purpose, sometimes 
a little spade which formed part of their accoutre- 
ments ; or, if that was lacking, they cut the sod with 
their jackknives, and scooped it out with broken can- 
teens, spoons, or hands ; and pushed themselves for- 



Oxe Thousand Boys in Blue. 261 

ward in the trenches thus made. A deserted battle- 
ground would thus resemble a deserted camp of 
prairie-dogs.) 

In the battles we have mentioned (space fails us to 
describe them) Lee had usually maintained the defen- 
sive, fighting mostly behind intrenchments. General 
CtUaxt found this a most expensive way of fighting. 
His army was now so near Lee's, and both were so 
near Richmond, that it was impossible for him to 
effect another of his flank movements, and interpose 
between Lee and the rebel Capital while on the north 
of the James. This consideration with others, deter- 
mined him to transport his army to the south of the 
James river, diverting the enemy's attention mean- 
while by cavalry raids, which should destroy his 
roads and bridges, and directing Butler to capture 
Petersburg and the crossings of the Appomattox. 
The plan, so far as the advance of his army was con- 
cerned, was successfully carried out. The 2d Corps, 
leaving Cold Harbor on the morning of the 13th. 
crossed the Chickahominj'-, and taking the advance, 
marched to the diaries City Court-house on the 
James. On the "14th and lf>th, the cavalry, artillery 
and wagon trains crossed that river on pontoons, 
which were a triumph of bridge-making skill. The 
bridge was 2, (MM) feet long, and the channel-boats 
were anchored in fifteen fathoms. The 120th, which 
was in 1>.\i:low's Division, crossed on transports 
brought up the river for the purpose at four o'clock 
on the morning of the lf>ih. 

One of the saddest mistakes of the war. involving; as 



262 The Adventures of 

it did the long siege of Petersburg, with its awful 
expenditure of life, was the failure to take possession 
of that city, when it lay comparatively undefended, 
an easy prey to our arms. This was owing to no 
fault of Grant's, who went in person to Bermuda 
Hundred to urge the dispatch of troops for that pur- 
pose, promising immediate co-operation. The expedi- 
tion started at once, under command of General 
Smith, and arrived at the northeast defenses of 
Petersburg at dawn of the 15th ; but, for some unex- 
plained reason, Smith delayed the attack until about 
sunset. Even then he captured the line of rifle-trenches 
and 300 prisoners. Had he pursued his advantage, 
the city would have been ours with little trouble. 
General Hancock arrived, with two Divisions of the 
2d Corps, just after nightfall, but waived his right to 
command in favor of Smith, who was acquainted 
with the ground, and had just had a brilliant success. 
The moon shone gloriously ; everything was favorable 
for a night attack ; but, most unfortunately, the 
golden moment was allowed to slip unimproved.* 
Through the night the enemy poured in troops, and 
although Grant fulfilled his promise, and followed 
Hancock's Corps with Burnside's and Wright's,. 
yet the enemy almost outnumbered us, and had time 
to strengthen the fortifications of Petersburg. 



* It is proper to say that the delay of Smith's attack is explained by him- 
self to have been caused by the force under his command being insufficient ; 
and that his expected reinforcements (the 2d Corps) were delayed by trusting 
to a perfectly worthless map which led them out of the way. If General 
Smith was in fault, it seems to have been only an excess of caution about 
risking the loss of what he had just gained. 





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O.xe Thousand Boys ix Blue 263 

Bassett, who was Captain of the provost guard, 
which, of course, brought up the rear of Hancocks 
Corps, protecting wagon and ambulance trains, writes 
on Thursday, the 16th, from near Petersburg : 
" Arrived here at five p. m., after a long, dusty, 
weary inarch, having had no sleep for two nights. 
When we arrived here the 2d and 9th Corps were 
massing for a ' grand charge ' on the enemy' s works, 
which they made just before sunset, Barlow's Divi- 
sion carrying two lines. Fighting has been pretty 
sharp all night." Sharp, indeed ! Coppee says : ''It 
was a terrible battle night. Birney, of the 2d Corps, 
stormed the advanced crest in his front." But per- 
haps the severest loss was inflicted upon Barlow's 
Division, and, as usual, the 126th bore its full share 
in the losses. Here fell Colonel Baird, who, since he 
rejoined the Regiment, in the fall of '63, had won the 
confidence of the superior officers, and endeared him- 
self to all by his kind and genial disposition, and his 
gallantry in action. The brave Lieutenant McDonald 
was instantly killed; and Captain Richardson, Lieu- 
tenant Dibble, and many enlisted men were severely 
wounded. John Rilkv and John Dinioax were 
among the killed. And here the gallant Lincoln, 
who had survived scores of lights, received the wound 
that caused his death. The army lost no braver 
spirit, and his native village still mourns one of her 
most promising sons. The Sabbath before the fatal 
wound, he had written to a dear friend: ''With you 
I would love to be sitting at this hour, listening to 
the preaching of the gospel ; but instead, 1 hear only 



264 The Adventures of 

the sounds that tell of death and destruction. * * * 
My time, energies and life are not too good to be 
given for the preservation of the Union, and the main- 
tenance of its laws ; I am here, and if necessary, I 
suppose I am to be a sacrifice for my country ; yet I 
have faith in GrOD that he will preserve me through it 
all, unscathed and uninjured. This is my prayer, and 
I believe, the prayer of all my friends, and I trust 
they will be heard and answered." Alas, it was not 
to be. His life, and many more equally precious, 
were the costly sacrifices that bought our final 
victory. 

Before saying more of the siege of Petersburg, car- 
ried on through long months, we will, in a few words, 
show why the place was so important, both to us and 
to the rebels. It stood on the south bank of the 
Appomattox, a branch of the James, twenty-two miles 
from Richmond. It was the third city in Virginia, in 
size, and through it passed the great southern lines of 
communication. Railroads and turnpikes connecting 
Richmond with Norfolk, City Point and Weldon, and 
the great Southside railroad to Lynchburg, pass 
through it, and the river is navigable for pretty large 
vessels, up nearly to the city. Richmond having no 
grand depot of provisions, and depending for supplies 
on the interior and western part of Virginia, and on 
the Carolinas, it will be evident that her railroads 
were of vital importance to her. Had possession been 
taken of Petersburg while it lay comparatively unde- 
fended, the supplies of Richmond could have been cut 
off, and her surrender might have taken place ten 




I / f I*v/ ft Richmond ,h- p 

/A«Wj r.VMl . / -^~)~ i ^Z /> 



CTERSBURG'-' 

hi Col W II lV.irif .h:,i</i/„-rr 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 265 

months sooner than it did. A bitter penalty was paid 
for a mistake of an hour ! 

Our army continued its assaults upon the lines of 
defense at Petersburg, with little advantage ; and at 
length GtEAnt was convinced that in order to take the 
city he must lay formal siege to it. 

[We omitted to say, in its proper place, that, in 
view of the losses in the 126th Regiment and its small 
numbers, a petition was addressed to Head-quarters, 
asking that the men who had been detailed on special 
service (i. e. as provost guard) might be returned to 
the Regiment, or else that the balance of the command, 
which did not exceed the strength of a Battalion, 
might also be detailed for special duty The latter 
proposal would probably have been carried out, had 
there been any to attend to the business. The 126th 
always had too much fighting to do to have leisure 
to look after its own interests.] 



Chapter 




JT will be perceived that the last act of the great 
drama of the rebellion had opened. Providence, 
which had led us through a Eed sea of carnage, 
and a wilderness of mistakes, and defeats, and abor- 
tive enterprises, had now granted us a leader whose 
motto was, "forward." No defeats discouraged him, 
no errors made him turn from his fixed purpose to 
destroy the rebel army, and bring to an end the 
Southern Confederacy. The horrible "blood and fire, 
and vapor of smoke," in the "Wilderness," the car- 
nage at Spottsylvania, the partial discomfiture at the 
North Anna, the deadly struggle at Cold Harbor, the 
error which lost us Petersburg ; events which would 
have disheartened and discouraged a less persistent 
commander, were to Grant only incidents of the great 
enterprise which was not to be abandoned until the 
contest between Union and secession was set at rest 
forever. Meade, with Grant for a leader, seconded 
all his efforts ; and all the officers of the army, and 
all the rank and file, seemed imbued with a new 
inspiration, now that thej- had a distinct object in 
view, and a definite plan for its attainment. 

Did space permit, we should like to follow the 
eo-<yperathe movements set on foot by Grant, in vari- 



268 The Adventures of 

ous parts of the country, the chief of which, perhaps, 
were the capture of Atlanta, and Sherman's "smash- 
ing ' ' march to the sea. Then there was the Louisiana 
expedition, the fall of Nashville, Grierson's splendid 
raid, and, in fact, the movements of all the armies 
now under the guidance of one man, all of which 
tended to the same grand result; that of "conquering 
peace." But all these incidents, which make the last 
year in our war perhaps the richest chapter in all 
military history, must be omitted. 

No leader had more of Grant's confidence than 
Sheridan, and the two worked admirably in concert. 
No one, perhaps, inflicted more damage upon the 
enemy in the destruction of their bridges, canals, rail- 
roads and depots of supplies. 

On the 17th and 18th of June, our army made des- 
perate attacks upon Petersburg, but only succeeded in 
driving the enemy to a strong interior line of defenses, 
which could not be forced. "Our army," says 
Grant, "now proceeded to envelop the city toward 
the Southside railroad, as far as possible without 
attacking fortifications." From the 20th to the 25th 
the most strenuous attempts were made to get posses- 
sion of the Weldon railroad. The losses in the 6th 
and 2d Corps were heavy ; among other officers killed 
was Captain Morris Brown, of the 126th ; a most 
gallant officer. But the road, being of vital importance 
to Richmond, was defended with such fierceness that 
the attempt to seize it was abandoned. We succeeded, 
however, in gaining a new position in advance, and 
extending our lines. Perhaps no move was of more 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 269 

importance at this time, than the occupation of Deep 
Bottom (a point only ten miles from Richmond), by 
General Butler, on the 21st and 22d, and connecting 
it by a pontoon bridge to Bermuda Hundred. 

There had now been more than two months of con- 
tinuous fighting, the men scarcely laying aside their 
accoutrements for five minutes together. The losses 
had been immense, almost 3,000 officers being among 
the killed, wounded, and missing, and these could not 
of course be immediately replaced. There must be 
time given for the newly appointed ones to gain the 
confidence of the troops, and the new recruits must be 
drilled somewhat, in order to be serviceable in action. 
The brave men of the 126th, who were so splendidly 
drilled at Centerville and Union Mills, and who were 
now veterans in the service, were reduced to a mere 
handful ; and such was the case with many of the 
other Regiments of the 2d Corps, which, as Coppee 
says, "had deserved the appellation given to the 9th 
Brigade, at Marengo, The Incomparables." Then the 
season was intensely hot, and water exceedingly scarce 
and poor. No wonder there was, for a brief season, a 
suspension of active hostilities in front of Petersburg. 

On the 26th of June, the 2d Corps, together with 
Sheridan and two Divisions of his cavalry, were 
ordered to join Butl Kit's forces at Deep Bottom, and 
drive the enemy from that vicinity As Captain 
Wilder, of the 126th, writes, "we made another 
grand Hank movement against the rebel cavalry, and 
drove them beautifully ; we captured four guns and 
some prisoners." The chief object of Grant in send- 



270 The Adventures of 

ing out this expedition was to divert the troops of 
Lee from the defense of Petersburg, while a novel 
method of attack was going on. A practical miner, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Pleasants, had obtained 
permission from Grant to undermine a fort which we 
had long assaulted in vain, and which if blown up 
would open a huge gateway to Cemetery Ridge and 
beyond it, even into the city itself. General Meade 
issued most explicit orders for the instruction of the 
storming party who were to rush in through the gap 
the instant it was opened. On the celerity with which 
this should be effected, depended the whole success 
of the enterprise. 

The explosion took place on the morning of the 30th, 
and was entirely successful. The vast mass of fortifi- 
cation, with its garrison of 300 men, was raised into 
the air, and fell back forming a huge gulf or crater ; 
and in an instant our artillery pours its ' ' thunder 
storms " through the gap. The half-awake rebels are 
paralyzed ; but, alas, our storming column seems to 
have been paralyzed too. A delay occurs ; the pre- 
cious moments are lost ; the enemy rallies from his 
surprise ; his guns are manned and pointed toward 
the crater. Our men at length move forward into the 
yawning chasm, but meet a deadly fire from every 
side. As Coppee says: "The place becomes a veri- 
table hell on earth." Advance and retreat seem alike 
impossible. The terrible engine ended in utter failure. 
Grant was chagrined and disappointed, as he had 
reason to be. He says: "Had the assaulting column 
promptly taken possession of the ridge beyond the 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 271 

crater, I have every reason to believe Petersburg would 
have fallen. What promised to be the most successful 
assault of the campaign, thus terminated in disaster/' 
Our losses in killed, wounded and missing were 4,003. 

Meanwhile the enemy, finding the Shenandoah val- 
ley undefended, tried his old game of threatening the 
north and striking at Washington, in order to divert 
Grant from the siege of Petersburg. Grant's posi- 
tion was embarrassing, owing to the difficulty of com- 
municating orders to such distant points. Telegraph 
wires were easily cut, and bearers of dispatches could 
be intercepted. The rebels grew bold, raided into 
Pennsylvania, and burnt the city of Chambersburg. 
In this emergency, General Grant concluded tempo- 
rarily to divide his authority by assigning to Philip 
Sheridan command of the departments of West Vir- 
ginia, Washington and the Susquehanna. Sheridan 
fully justified the confidence of his chief. His exploits 
in Northern Virginia read like a romance. His suc- 
cess was complete. He drove the enemy through that 
valley, by which they had so often invaded the north, 
in complete rout, and they never tried it again. 
General Grant complimented "Little Phil." in a 
commendatory order, and the President raised his 
rank to that of Major-General. 

Of the next movement of the army we will let Cap- 
tain Bass kit, of the provost guard, speak: "August 
14, 1804. Day before yesterday we broke camp and 
marched to City Point. Yesterday the troops were all 
day shipping on board of transports and moving down 
the river. Just at dark, after the troops had all 



272 The Adventures of 

shipped, the 2d Army Corps head-quarters including 
the provost-guard, got aboard the "Metamora" and 
steamed up the river, followed by the whole fleet. It 
was a lovely moonlight night ; a splendid sight, and a 
pleasant ride. This morning about daylight we were 
all landed near "Deep Bottom Bridge," on the north 
side of the James, and in the same place where we 
were a few weeks ago. The Corps was immediately 
advanced, the 1st Division (Barlow's) taking the 
lead ; and the 3d Brigade, thrown out as skirmishers, 
came up to the "Johnnies," charged them, and drove 
them from their breastworks. Fighting has been 
pretty brisk all day General Grant just left here. 
Four p. m. : Our troops are fixing to make a charge 
in force. I suppose our moving down the river in the 
daytime, in full sight of the rebels, was a ruse to 
cover our real intentions. * * * The gun boats 
just opened their 100-pounders within ten rods of me, 
and lifted me right off my seat. You will believe 
they make a noise." The object of this expedition 
seems to have been to attract the enemy's attention to 
the north of the James, while another expedition was 
to attack the Weldon railroad again. It had another 
.effect, which was to keep back two Divisions of the 
enemy, who would otherwise have gone to the Shenan- 
doah, and have been added to the army fighting 
against Sheridan. The affair was a success ; we 
taking many prisoners. On the 20th, Hancock was 
ordered to take his Corps back to Petersburg. War- 
ren, on the 20th, gained final possession of the Wel- 
don railroad, and the 2d Corps (Hancock's) was 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 273 

advanced toward it. In a fight which ensued for the 
possession of Beams' Station, we were unsuccessful; 
but the railroad was ours ; and the enemy fell back 
to within three miles of Petersburg, we following and 
intrenching on the railroad. A pause followed, during 
which we strengthened our lines and connected the 
City Point, where our depot was, and the Petersburg 
roads with the Weldon, thus insuring supplies in all 
weathers. 

[Extract from Doctor Hoyt's Diary.] 
September 5, 1864. — Last night the rumor of the fall of Atlanta 
was confirmed by a dispatch from General Grant, and by his 
order a salute was fired at midnight by all the guns from Deep 
Bottom to the extreme left. At the same time all the bands were 
playing national airs. I never witnessed such fine artillery practice. 
For nearly two hours the air was filled with bursting shells, and 
the roar was almost deafening. 

On the 22d of September, Henry Lee, of the 126th, 
who had charge of the ammunition train, gives an 
account of the rejoicings in camp over Sheridan's 
victories; and of Hancock's going home, and General 
A. A. Humphrey's taking command of the 2d Corps. 
He also mentions that the consolidation of Regiments 
is broken up, and that the old 126th is itself again. 
He details a raid of the rebels in which they captured 
our herd of army cattle, 2,500 head, at Coggin's Point, 
giving the enemy much needed rations of fresh, beef. 
Captain Geddis writes on the 26th of September, that 
"the strength of the Regiment is as follows, not includ- 
ing men detached for special service : commissioned 
officers, eight; enlisted men, sixty; strength present 
and absent (/. e. in hospital and on furlough) : Com- 



274 The Adventures of 

missioned officers, twenty ; enlisted men, 418." He 
adds : ' ' We are now supporting the front line. 
There was a detail sent out last night, and, strange to 
say, none of the 126th were in it. We have not 
received any recruits, nor do we expect to receive any ; 
every other Regiment has some persons at the north 
to look after its interests," &c. The officers of the 
Regiment were Captains G-eddis and Wilder, Lieu- 
tenants Randolph, Gage, Hooper and Hughes. 
Captains Bassett and Munson were in the provost 
guard ; the Chaplain was on duty in hospital. 

[Further Extracts from Doctor Hoyt's Diary.] 

September 11, 1864. — During the past few days a railroad has 
been built from the City Point road to the Weldon railroad, and 
was completed yesterday to General Warren's head-quarters. 
The army on this line is supplied by this road. Trains are pass, 
ing at all hours. 

September 30. — Butler and Birney are crowding on toward 
Richmond, and have captured a number of guns and prisoners. 

October 1. — Grant's object seems to be to strike on the 
extremes of the lines ; near Richmond on the right, and South- 
side railroad to the left. 

October 25. — The entire line from the Appomattox to our 
extreme left is held by our Division, one Division of the 5th, and 
one of the 9th Corps. The balance of the army ishere massed 
ready to move. The troops along the line have twenty days' 
rations, together with a large amount of ammunition, stored in 
the bomb-proofs. All surplus stores are being sent within the 
fortifications at City Point. 

And so this part of the army lay for many days, 
awaiting an attack. 

We will take this opportunity to give some addi- 
tional particulars relative to the provost guard, to 
■which allusion is so frequently made. At the com- 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 275 

mencement of chapter nineteenth we spoke of the 
detail of 100 officers and men from the 126th Regi- 
ment to act as provost guard at the head-quarters of 
the 2d Corps. The Regiment felt this to be a high 
compliment, and were glad to believe they owed it to 
General Alexander Hays' recommendation. The 
Captain of the guard was Richard A. Bassett, and 
the Lieutenant was Ten Eyck Mttnson. Some of its 
duties were mentioned in the chapter referred to. 
Besides policing the camp, i. e., keeping everything 
clean and in perfect order, they were to escort all 
convalescents and recruits who arrived to their proper 
Divisions. In time of battle they were to cover the 
rear, and see that soldiers who came thither with the 
wounded returned immediately to their posts of duty \ 
and also to take charge of captured prisoners. When 
sufficient numbers of the latter were collected, they 
were counted and started for army head-quarters 
under charge of a mounted provost. On the march 
their duty was to bring up the rear, keep the men up 
to the ranks, and examine barns or other structures 
on the road side which might afford shelter to 
deserters. 

Sometimes their duties seemed rather harsh. Cap- 
tain Munson relates that on one occasion Corporal 
Babcock of the guard discovered a soldier in the act 
of maiming himself, by discharging his gun through 
his hand. No hospital for him ! The order was to 
send the offender to the front, where he could get 
wounded in a less reprehensible manner. 
18 



276 The Adventures of 

All through the battles of the Wilderness, and at 
the Po river, Cold Harbor, &c, the duties of the 
guard, like those of the rest of the Regiment, were very 
severe, especially at the grand charge at Spottsylvania 
where they had more prisoners than they could well 
attend to. Their exposure to shell was perhaps 
greater than that of the rest of the army, for these 
missiles often pass over the combatants in battle and 
explode in the rear. This was especially the case at 
the battle of Cold Harbor. At the crossing of rivers 
it was their duty to assist in loading the transports 
with troops and the "materiel" of war. 

Captain Munson's letters give an interesting inci- 
dent which occurred at Petersburg, where he was on 
duty, sending back to their posts the soldiers who 
brought the wounded to the Surgeons. A soldier of a 
Pennsylvania Regiment brought a wounded comrade 
to the rear, and after laying him down, was requested 
to return to his place in the ranks, being assured that 
all which was possible should be done for his friend. 
But, with anguish depicted in every feature, the sol- 
dier begged to remain with his only and twin orotlier 
until death should end his sufferings. He must have 
had a hard heart who could refuse such an appeal. 
At all events, Munso^ could not ; and in two hours 
the poor fellow had closed his dying brother' s eyes, and, 
with the assistance of others, laid him in a shallow 
grave under an apple tree near by, and placed at his 
head a board marked with his name, Regiment and 
Company The soldier then picked up his gun ; 
thanked those in charge for their kindness and assist- 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 277 

ance, and returned to his post with a heart too full 
of sorrow to shed a single tear. 

In the fight of the 22d of June in which our Kegi- 
ment suffered so severely, Captain Morris Brown 
and others being killed, the provost guard were 
deployed just behind the breastworks, and were under 
fire both from artillery and musketry, for many 
hours; but, says Captain M., strange to say, no one 
was injured. 

In the intervals of severe engagements, the guard 
erected tents and awnings for the officers, and made 
head-quarters comfortable. This work had to be often 
repeated, owing to frequent changes of position. 

On the 2d of July the head-quarters were estab- 
lished at the "Jones House," the family occupying 
the rear rooms, and fed mostly from our officers' 
tables. On the 13th, the Corps and of course its 
head-quarters, was moved to a place called "Deserted 
House," where shade and good water were abundant. 

In the engagement at Deep Bottom the provosts had 
the satisfaction of guarding more than five hundred 
prisoners and several pieces of artillery, captured in 
the heavy skirmishing there. It was also their busi- 
ness there to cover with grass and weeds the pontoon 
bridge, so that the troops and cavalry could be with- 
drawn without noise. 

The following remarks of Mr. Greeley respecting 
Grant's tactics, are so apposite that Ave extract them 
with pleasure: "Grant's conduct of this campaign 
was not satisfactory to the confederate critics, who 



278 The Adventures of 

gave a decided preference to the strategy of MoClel- 
lan. They held that the former only aimed to over- 
power and crush by brute force ; by the employment 
of overwhelming numbers ; and by a lavish expenditure 
of blood. Doubtless a great military genius, such as 
appears once in two or three centuries, might have 
achieved them at smaller cost ; as a timid, hesitating, pur- 
poseless commander would have failed to achieve them 
at all. The merit which may fairly be claimed for Grant 
is that of resolutely undertaking a very difficult and 
formidable task, and executing it to the best of his 
ability ; at all events, doing it. That, when south of 
the James, he was just where the rebels wished him 
not to be, they showed by desperate and hazardous 
efforts to draw him thence ; and the proof was dupli- 
cated in the final collapse of the rebellion. Other 
campaigns were more brilliant ; but none contributed 
more positively and eminently to break the power of 
the confederates than that which began on the Rapi- 
dan and ended in front of Petersburg and across the 
Weldon road." [American Conflict, p. 597.] 

Official Memorandum of Engagements during the Campaign from 
May 4th to November 1st, 1864. 

The Wilderness, May 5th and 6th. 
The Po, May 7th and 8th. 
The Ny, May — . 
Spottsylvania, May 12th. 
do May 18th. 

Fredericksburg road, May 19th. 
North Anna river, May 23d to 24th. 
Tolopotomoy, May 31st to June 1st. 
Coal Harbor, June 3d to 10th. 
Petersburg, June 16th, 17th and 18th. 



One Thousand Hoys in Blue. 279 

Petersburg, June 22(1. 

Deep Bottom, July 26th, 27th and 28th. 

Petersburg Mine, July 30th. 

Deep Bottom, August 12th and 18th. 

Reams' Station, August 25th. 

On the line, August 20th to November 1st. 

Burgis' Tavern, Boydton plank road, Hatchers' Run, Oct. 27th. 

(Signed) SEP CARNCROSS, 

Ass't. Adjutant- General, Head-quarters 2d Army Corps. 
November, 4, 1864. 

N. B. — In almost every one of these engagements the 126th 
Regiment had a part. 



H A P T E P v 




I 1 



C^fHE season in which armies usually go into winter 
quarters was approaching. Space has compelled 
us to omit many sanguinary battles in which the 
126th generally bore its full share ; battles in which 
great losses in men were compensated by gain in posi- 
tion and in the constant pushing of the enemy toward 
his Capital. We had gained a point on the Weldon 
road which seriously interfered with the enemy's com- 
munications ; but there were still the Boydton plank 
and the Southside railroad, and others of which it was 
important to gain possession. Therefore, before ceas- 
ing fall operations, all our troops except necessary 
guards of positions already gained, and a show of 
force left to mislead the enemy, were secretly with- 
drawn from before Petersburg, and advanced toward 
the roads mentioned. Hancock with the 2d Corps 
advanced rapidly, crossed Hatcher's Run and reached 
the Boydton road. The Divisions of the 5th Corps, 
which were to join and co-operate with him, being 
ignorant of the territory, failed to do so, and the ever 
watchful enemy rushed into the space between the 2d 
and 5th Corps, attacking both in flank. The 2d Corps 
instantly faced about to meet the attack, and after a 
bloody tight, drove the enemy ; but being recalled, 



282 The Adventures of 

withdrew to the forts around Petersburg. The advan- 
tage gained by this movement was a knowledge of the 
territory (which before had been terra incognita to us) ; 
but it must be confessed it was dearly bought. The 
tired troops now had a brief season of comparative 
rest. Grant had his head-quarters at City Point. 

During this eventful winter occurred the capture by 
General A. H. Terry and Admiral Porter, of Fort 
Fisher, and the consequent fall of Wilmington. This 
was a most important acquisition, giving us the con- 
trol of a harbor which had been a refuge for blockade 
runners throughout the war. The enemy thus lost his 
last port of entry ; all the others having previously 
been blockaded. General Butler's attempt to shorten 
the navigation of the James by the "Dutch Gap 
Canal" was made during this period. Sherman, who 
had taken his great army through Georgia "smashing 
things," as he said in his letter, was at Savannah. 
Thence he made a triumphal march northward ; Col- 
umbia, Winsboro', Cheraw, Fayetteville and other 
places, falling before him like trees before a mighty 
wind. Schofield, now military Governor of the 
department of North Carolina, and who had reduced 
Kingston and Goldsborough, met him at the latter 
place, and for a time the troops were halted there. 
Thomas was successfully operating against the enemy 
in Alabama. In February and March, Sheridan 
made a splendid progress from Winchester (near Har- 
per's Ferry) to City Point, destroying on his way 
bridges, canals and railways, beating the enemy in 
many battles, capturing many prisoners, and getting 



Oxe Thousaxd Boys ix Blue. 283 

possession of many strongholds. The circle of fire was 
fast surrounding the scorpion, secession ; and it must 
inevitably perish. 

But to return to the army before Petersburg. Hax- 
cock, who had gone north on recruiting service, was 
replaced by General A. A. Humphreys. On the 5th 
of February, still another attempt was made to gain 
possession of the Danville and Southside roads. War- 
rex with the 5th Corps, and Humphreys with the 2d, 
together with Gregg's cavalry, started for Hatcher's 
Run ; the attempt being masked by a continuous artil- 
lery fire along our lines. As far as gaining the South- 
side road was the object, the expedition was not 
successful ; but the vigor and skill of the 2d Corps 
prevented ultimate disaster, and prolonged the Union 
line westward to Hatcher's Run. We should have 
mentioned that in December, twenty miles more of the 
Weldon railroad had been destroyed by Warrex's 
Corps. 

In March, Lee "was almost shut up between the 
armies of the Potomac and James." The great cry, 
On to Richmond ! was now exchanged for another, 
Capture Lee and his army ! And here, as has been 
noticed by other writers, were some points of delicate 
adjustment. Not only was it important that Lee's 
army should be captured, but that the brave old army 
of the Potomac, so long engaged in the most arduous 
and exhausting service, often without the meed of pre- 
sent success, should have the honor of the capture. 
No man knew better than G-raxt the persevering and 
disinterested labors of this army ; and no man knew 



284 The Adventures of 

better the preciousness of the reward they would find 
in final victory. The nation rang with the exploits of 
the western armies ; while the heroic and persistent, 
but less brilliant campaigns of the toilers of the sea- 
board, had obtained little from the public but criti- 
cism, if not blame. Grant's aim in the spring cam- 
paign of 1865, was so to dispose of all co-operative 
forces as to prevent Lee's escape ; and so to manage 
his own as to give them the much coveted reward of 
Lee's final surrender. Few were left, it is true, of the 
original army ; few especially of the original 2d Corps ; 
and with emphasis we may say, few indeed of the old 
126th, which having scarcely been at all reinforced by 
recruits, was now but the remnant of a Regiment. 
But to those few, and to the friends of the dead who 
filled unhonored graves from Gettysburg to Richmond, 
or languished in captivity far worse than death in 
rebel prisons, the glory of ultimate triumph would be 
all the more dear for the terrible suffering which had 
bought it. 

In all his arrangements, Grant proceeded with a 
delicacy and tact worthy of all praise. His instruc- 
tions to General Meade, issued March 24th, show full 
comprehension of the situation, and capacity to meet 
it. Indeed, in this as in other orders, his peculiar 
traits of good sense and sagacity are strongly marked. 
While he carefully elaborates the outlines of his 
instructions, he (in the case of such commanders as 
share his confidence,) leaves the details to their 
judgment. 

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One Thousand Boys in Blue. 285 

Grant's head-quarters at City Point, between that 
General, President Lincoln, and Generals Meade, 
Sheridan, and Sherman. Rarely has there been an 
assemblage of more military talent under one roof. 
Each enjoying the entire confidence of the rest, they 
doubtless on this occasion matured those plans which 
were to bring to an end this cruel and desolating war. 
Just before this, on the 25th, Lee made a bold and 
sudden assault upon a strongly fortified point, Fort 
Steadman, on our right front. This was in order to 
mask a withdrawal of his army to the south side of 
the Appomattox, whence his hope was to unite with 
Johnson, and wage a continued defensive war with the 
Union armies. His attack was of the nature of a 
surprise and was at first successful, capturing the 
fort with three Batteries ; but our troops rallied and 
recaptured the fort and guns, and 2,000 prisoners ; 
Humphreys with the 2d Corps taking the enemy's 
strongly intrenched line of pickets. Our honored 
President witnessed this battle and recapture, and 
declared it was better than the review which had 
been promised him. The journal of Andrews, of the 
126th sa} T s of this action: "At first the colored 
troops were driven from their works, but, the 6th 
and 9th Corps coming up, the blacks rallied, and in 
turn drove the enemy The 3d Brigade, including the 
1 26th, were not engaged until afternoon, when they 
succeeded in advancing their line, with the loss of two 
men killed (of Company A,) and several wounded. 
For their gallant conduct on this occasion, the Brigade 
was complimented by General Madill, in an order 



286 The Adventures of 

read on dress parade." We extract further details 
from the same journal. "On the 27th, the men were 
ordered to have cartridges and four days' rations in 
haversacks, and to send all surplus baggage to City 
Point. Captain J B. Geddis, being the senior officer 
present, took command of the Regiment. Great curi- 
osity was felt by the men as to what the new move 
was to be, and much discussion as to parting with over- 
coats . and blankets, for the nights were cold ; but all 
knew that on the march these articles would be 
thought superfluous, and must be parted with. At 
nine a. m., March 29th, the bugle sounded Forward! 
and the march began. The men were in high spirits, 
for Petersburg had become exceedingly monotonous, 
and they were glad to change the scene. Soon, how- 
ever, the 126th had their old duty of skirmishing to 
do, advancing two miles, and remaining out forty- 
eight hours. The soil where they lay was marshy ; 
the rain fell, at first slowly, then heavily, and the 
poor boys, minus overcoats and blankets, and with 
no chance to boil coffee or cook their pork, probably 
wished themselves back in the trenches near Peters- 
burg." On the morning of the 30th came the signal 
for a general assault. (This was the battle near Five 
Forks.) Humphreys with the 2d Corps held the 
Boydton road, having driven the enemy from his front : 
Sheridan and Merritt, with their cavalry, assisting. 
The battle became general. The 3d Brigade (inclu- 
ding the 126th) fought nobly ; losing Pierson, of 
Company I, killed ; and Captain Geddis, Lieutenant 
Hopper, Lieutenant Pasko, and many enlisted men, 





CLINTON DUCALD MAC DOUGAL, E\/BRi G. GENERAL, U.S . V 



Vi.j ■< byE B ILill fr frm Fhih if S. S. Squyer 



FuilishBi if- Itui . B . Eaclielder 
SEW TTIB.E: 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 287 

wounded. The enemy lost severely, and were driven 
into their main line of works. As General Sheridan 
says, in his way: "The enemy were completely 
routed, the 5th Corps doubling up their left flank in 
confusion, and the cavalry of General Mekeitt dash- 
ing on to the White Oak road, capturing their artil- 
lery and turning it upon them ; and riding into their 
broken ranks, so demoralized them that they made no 
serious stand after their line was carried, but took to 
flight in disorder. They lost between five and six 
thousand prisoners. The Regiment (Andrews writes) 
rested in a cluster of pines through the night, and 
the next day was supplied by the Commissary with 
fresh beef, which was quite refreshing. On the follow- 
ing morning General Miles with the 1st Division, 
drove a Division of the enemy beyond Hatcher's Run 
to a point near Southside railroad, called Sutherland's 
Depot, where they intrenched themselves strongly 
Two Divisions of the 5th Corps, some of Sheridan's 
cavalry, and the 3d Brigade, were sent to dislodge 
them. The 3d Brigade, commanded by General 
Madill. charged once and again, but unsuccessfully ; 
the foe was too strongly posted, and provided with 
artillery, which was wanting on our side. The brave 
General Madill was wounded and General McDougal 
took command.* Again and again the Brigade charged 

* Brevet Brigadier-General Clinton Dugald McDougal was born in 
Scotland, June 14, 18;!!). In 1842, his father established himself in Canada, 
and young McDougal, came to the State of New York at the asje of twelve 
years, and from that time made this State his home ; first as a student, then 
as a bookkeeper in a store, and subsequently in a bank at Auburn, N. Y. 
In 1859, he went to Alabama for his health, and remained till after the 



288 The Adventures of 

desperately, but in vain. McDougal was wounded, 
and one arm hung useless at his side. But he kept 
his saddle, and once more gallantry and impetuously 
charged upon the works. This time they were car- 
ried ; and several guns and hundreds of prisoners fell 
into our hands. The Southside railroad was effectu- 
ally cut ; and the enemy fled by the main road along 
the Appomattox. One incident deserves notice. The 
Brigade flag was lost — its bearer being shot from his 
horse ; but the gallant fellow clung to it, nor would 
he yield it till overpowered by numbers. This }*oung 

nomination of Lincoln, in 1860, when he returned impressed with the con- 
viction, that the people of the south were irrevocably committed to the 
policy of making slavery national, and meant war if they could not carry 
their points politically; and at the succeeding election, he cast his first 
political ballot for Lincoln and Hamlin. On his return from the south, he 
engaged in the business of banking, with Wm. H. Seward, Jr., at Auburn, 
N. Y., which business was continued during the war. In March and April, 
1861, he was traveling in the western States, and was at St. Louis, Mo., when 
Sumter was first fired on, and he knew from his experience in the south, 
that this was but a signal for a general uprising there, and a desperate con- 
flict between the north and south. He hurried home to respond to his 
country's call for men, but the first Regiment (the 19th New York Volunteers), 
recruited in that vicinity, had already gone to the seat of war, and he joined 
the "Willard Guard (49th New York State Militia), as Second Lieutenant. 
As soon as the next call for troops was made, he headed an enlistment roll 
and recruited the first Company for the 75th New York Volunteers ; was 
commissioned its senior Captain, September 16th, 1861 ; went with his Re<n- 
ment to Port Pickens, Fla. ; remained there till May, 1862, when the forces 
crossed to Pensacola. On the night following, there was an adventure 
between some of the enemey's cavalry and our forces guarding a bridge, and 
Captain McDougal, while returning with a detachment sent out in pursuit 
of the enemy, was fired upon by our own men, and severely wounded in 
the thigh, the bullet splintering the bone. In consequence of this wound 
and the approaching unhealthy season, he received leave to come home 
as seon as he was able to make the journey; and while convalescent, the 
call of July, 1862, for 300,000 men, was made, and Captain McDougal 
exerted himself to recruit the 111th Regiment, New York Volunteers, and 
was appointed Lieutenant-Colonel of this Regiment, August 15th, 1862 ; and 
was promoted Colonel, January 3d, 1863. 



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man, whose name was Herman Fox, Company E, 
126th New York Volunteers, refused to go with the 
enemy as prisoner, and on the second charge was 
retaken by his friends. He afterward lost his hand 
from the wound received at this time. The Brigade 
rested a little north of the railroad that night. The 
number of rebel dead and wounded was very great. 
On the night of April 1st, says an officer, our artil- 
lery opened along the entire line from Richmond to 
the extreme left. The roar along the lines was contin- 
uous and deafening ; but above this could be distinctly 

Colonel McDougal was indefatigable in his efforts in drilling and dis- 
ciplining his Regiment, and commanded it in the battle of Gettysburg, until 
Colonel Sherrill, commanding the Brigade, fell mortally wounded during 
the rebel charge on Cemetery Hill, July 3d, when Colonel McDougal 
took command of the Brigade. He was also wounded during this charge, 
by a musket shot breaking one of the bones of the left forearm, but though 
suffering from loss of blood and excruciating pain, he remained on the field 
till the enemy was repulsed, and then fainted from exhaustion. He was 
absent on account of his wounds till the August following, when, having 
partially recovered, he reported for duty at Elk Run, and served with his com- 
mand till the latter part of November, 1863 ; and was then granted leave of 
absence to go home on account of his sickness ; and was afterward detached 
on recruiting service, to fill up the ranks of his Regiment, which had been 
greatly depleted during the summer campaign, particularly at Gettysburg. 
Colonel McDougal rejoined his Regiment in the spring of 1864, with a 
large reinforcement of recruits, and in the spring compaign commanded the 
3d Brigade of the 3d Division in the 2d Corps, from the battle of the Po 
River to tin* movement from Cold Harbor to Petersburg, and commanded 
the Brigade most of the time thereafter until the close of the war. He was 
wounded by a musket shot in the right forearm, while leading the Brigade 
in the charge at Sutherland's Station, April 2d, 1865; but binding up his 
arm and carrying it in a sling, he retained his command through the cam- 
paign, until after the surrender of Lee at Appomattox, and was discharged 
at the close of the war. He was made a Brevet Brigadier General, February 
25th, 1865, there, being no vacancy in the full rank. General McDocgal 
was in the battles in which his Regiment and Brigade participated during 
the war, and exercised his command with great spirit and efficiency, and 
shrank from no danger when duty called him. 



290 The Adventures of 

heard the heavy guns from the gun-boats and moni- 
tors in the James river, twenty-five miles distant ; a 
grand accompaniment to the battle's awful music then 
pealing forth from more than five hundred cannons' 
throats. 

The 9th Corps was massed in front of Petersburg, 
and assaulted that point ; the 6th, on the left of the 
city, assaulted simultaneously with the 9th ; the 24th, 
a colored Corps under General Ord held a portion of 
the line from Petersburg to the extreme left. When 
the 9th and 6th Corps broke the enemy's lines on 
their front, the rebel right, across Hatcher's Run, gave 
way ; retreating along the rear of their old line, and 
forming a junction with the main portion of their 
army which was retreating toward the Appomattox, 
hotly pursued by the 2d, 5th and cavalry Corps, sup- 
ported by the whole remaining force of the armies of 
the Potomac and James, except the 9th Corps. And 
now ensued the great race ; with the rebels, for 
escape ; on our part, for capture of their armies. 

On Sunday, April 2d, Jeff. Davis being in church 
in Richmond, it was suddenly announced that "the 
Federals" were about to enter the city. "The rebel 
army, on the night of the 2d of April, had left in 
frantic haste to join Johnston." At an early hour 
on the morning of the 3d, the 2d Corps moved rapidly 
along the Southside railroad in pursuit of the enemy 
The 126th was detailed on the morning of the 4th as 
a wagon guard, and marched all day, carrying rails 
and corduroying the muddy road for the train as they 
went. On the 5th they went on toward Amelia 




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One I'hovsaxd Boys in Blue. 291 

Springs, following the enemy, who were said to be at 
Amelia Court-house. Sheridan kept ahead of the 
rebels to cut off their retreat, and the 2d, 5th and 
6th Corps, with Sheridan's cavalry pressed so closely 
on their rear, they were obliged to abandon their train 
of four hundred wagons laden with stores, which fell 
into our hands ; a welcome supply to our men, but a 
sad loss to them. As Andrews says, "our boys 
made a very good supper that evening." On the 
6th the cavalry under Sheridan, with the 24th and 
6th Corps (infantry), had a battle with the enemy at 
Sailor's creek, capturing 6,000 or 7,000 prisoners, a 
large number of whom were general officers, and six- 
teen guns. Two men in the 126th were wounded. 
1 ; The enemy was all now north of the Appomattox ; 
but so close was the pursuit that the 2d Corps seized 
High Bridge before the enemy could destroy it, and 
followed at their heels." General Humphreys moved 
the Corps across as rapidly as possible, and obliged 
the enemy to abandon sixteen heavy guns, and fall 
back two miles to a height where he entrenched him- 
self. Miles' and Barlow's Divisions attacked him 
here, the 126th being engaged, but losing no men, as 
they fought in the woods, behind trees. The 3d 
Brigade of the 1st Division of the 2d Corps led the 
advance on the 8th, and followed close on the enemy's 
rear, the 126th being detailed as flankers. 

On the 7th of April General Grant had commenced a 
correspondence with Lee, endeavoring to convince him 
of the futility of further resistance, and putting upon 
19 



292 The Adventures of 

him the responsibility of the further effusion of blood ; 
and on the 9th received a letter proposing a meeting 
to settle terms of surrender. We will quote again (in 
substance) from Andeews. About ten a. m., April 
9, a shrill bugle sound was heard, when the column 
was moved off the road, and General Meade and 
staff, with guard, passed to the front with a white 
flag. All felt confident that it meant something more 
than ordinary, and the army was in high spirits with 
the expectation that the rebel army would soon sur- 
render. The Corps moved forward and halted in a 
large field, where they had a rest of about three 
hours ; and at two o'clock the news came that Gene- 
ral Lee had surrendered his whole army to General 
Grant. The ensuing hour the air was rent with 
cheers ; such enthusiasm, such vociferous cheering and 
wild glee was never heard outside the army A time 
never to be forgotten by any member present of the 
126th. All felt that the one great object had been 
obtained, — the complete defeat and capture of the con- 
federate army of Virginia, -- by stern perseverance 
through four long bloody years. As Coppee remarks : 
"Lee, the greatest man, as well as the ranking sol- 
dier in the confederacy, had given up the cause, and 
his influence broke up the rebellion. Grant had 
realized as the result of his arduous labors a most 
complete and gratifying success." 

"The soldiers' work was nearly done in Virginia.'" 
Near the Appomattox the 2d Corps remained until 
the 11th, "when they moved back over the same 
road by which they had come." The rain poured in 



One Thousand Boys in Blue. 293 

torrents, small streams were swelled to rivers, but 
were cheerfully forded, for the men were on their way 
back to home and peace. "Reaching Burdville on the 
13th, they remained there long enough to hear the 
' ' sad news of the assassination, at Washington, of the 
nation's best friend." On the 25th they heard of the 
final surrender of Johnson and his army to General 
Sherman ; and one after another, of the submission of 
the various Divisions of the rebel army. 

The Regiment remained encamped near Rice's sta- 
tion on the railway until the 2d of May, when they 
broke camp and moved toward Richmond, reaching 
that stronghold of "the confederacy," or rather of 
rebellion, on the 7th of May. On the 11th the Corps 
passed through Fredericksburg, — that "Aceldema" of 
the Potomac army, now powerless and in ruins ; and 
on the 16th were encamped near Ball's Cross-roads, 
not far from Alexandria. On the 23d of May the 
Grand Review of the army took place at Washington ; 
one of the most splendid and imposing sights ever 
witnessed on this continent. The small remnant of the 
126th, only eighty men fit for duty, took part in this 
Review, and shared its triumph. Their wasted ranks 
bore witness to the. severity of the service the^v had seen. 
"On the 2d of June an order came that the 126th 
be mustered out of the service, and placed en route 
for their State rendezvous." "On the 16th of June, 
nearly three years from the time the Regiment passed 
through Elmira 1,000 strong, it received its discharge 
221 strong. Where are the missing ones ''. The green 
fields of Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia hide 



294 The Adventures of One Thousand Boys in Blue. 

the remains of many ; the cemeteries of Ontario, Yates 
and Seneca are the resting places of others. Some, 
with honorable scars or frames enfeebled by the hard- 
ships of war, still linger among us to receive our 
gratitude and honor. We may give it without stint 
or abatement ; for, in spite of the calumny of inte- 
rested individuals, and the censure of a military com- 
mission misled by wrong testimony, their record was 
an honorable one throughout. Not only Gettysburg, 
Auburn, "the Wilderness,' ' Spottsylvania, the North 
Anna, the Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, and 
Hatcher's Run, with many other interesting points, 
bore witness to their valor ; but if the testimony we 
have adduced is believed, Maryland Heights and 
Harper's Ferry must be added names on their scroll 
of honor. 



Chapter XXTTT 



(foYN Saturday morning, April 10, 1865, it was known 
qjjo throughout our broad domain that the rebellion 
<yp was crushed, that its master-spirit had surren- 
dered, that the "Union was preserved!" As cities, 
towns and villages caught the flashing missives from 
the wires, flags were raised, cannon were fired, bells 
were rung, and men, women and children burst into 
the wildest excesses of joy Those who had been most 
hopeless of our final success, seemed most jubilant 
over the victory ; and croaking was turned to shout- 
ing. On the next day which was the Sabbath, the 
churches rang with thanksgivings to Him who had 
given us the victory ; and Monday evening was lighted 
up with bonfires and illuminations. On the west front 
of the national Capitol, near the roof, appeared the 
inscription, "This is the Lord's doing and it is mar- 
vellous in our eyes/' The names of our military and 
naval heroes were on every lip ; and many an illumi- 
nated device bore those of G-kant, Siieumax, and 
Siikkidan, with others scarcely less illustrious. Nor 
wns he forgotten who for four years had borne the 
struggling nation on his faithful heart, and who by 
the voice of that nation had just been intrusted with 
her destinies for four years to come ; the wise and 



296 The Adventures of 

good Man who seemed to have been raised by Provi- 
dence to guide us through this awful period of our 
history, and permitted to witness the success of the 
cause he loved so well, and then with the songs of 
victory yet ringing in his ears, to fall by the blow of 
a dastardly assassin. This is no place for his eulogy, 
or we would slightly alter the words put into Wol- 
sey's lips by Shakespeare, and say that he 

" Loved himself last ; cherished the hearts that hated him ; 
Still in his right hand carried gentle peace 
To silence envious tongues; was just and feared not ; 
That all the ends he aimed at were his country's, 
His God's, and truth's ; and when at last he fell, 
He fell a blessed Martyr !" 

Through disaster and struggle, to final triumph, we 
have now brought the remnant of our band of vol- 
unteers. We have avoided eulogy of individuals, for 
fear of seeming injustice toward those not thus 
noticed. To say that every man of any Regiment 
was brave and true to the flag, would probably not 
be true ; but that this Regiment as a whole, main- 
tained a character for promptness, energy, firmness 
and bravery, we have every evidence. We have 
shown the falsity of the charges against them in the 
affair at Maryland Heights, and also at Chicago ; 
charges which made scores of them rush on death 
to clear themselves from the imputation of cowardice. 
A careful inspection of the Official Army Register 
shows that no Regiment of infantry from the State 
of New York, lost so many officers from wounds 
received in action, as the 126th New York Volun- 
teers, except the 48th and 88th infantry and the 8th 



Oxe Thousand Boys ix Blue. 297 

New York Artillery. But it must be remembered 
that these three Regiments received large recruits in 
officers and men, while the 126th had never a single 
officer added to it and scarcely a score of men, after 
its first enrollment. Therefore its losses were much 
greater proportionally than those of any other New 
York Regiment. 

We conclude with the testimony of Major- General 
Hancock, in a letter dated as late as August, 1868 : 
* * * "The 126th Regiment N. Y. Yols. served 
under my command in the 2d Army Corps, Army 
of the Potomac, during several of the most impor- 
tant campaigns of that army The Regiment bore a 
most excellent reputation while under my command, 
and took an honorable part in the great battles in 
which it was engaged." This testimony from such 
a General, is very valuable. 

And here our task ends. For more than a year r 
we have followed the fortunes of this Regiment, 
examining for the purpose every document, printed 
and manuscript, within our reach ; sparing no labor 
of research ; writing and re-writing again and again, 
as fresh materials came to hand, the simple story, 
which we now, with mingled hopes and fears, com- 
mit to the public. 



APPENDIX, 



CONTAINING A 



(SfowMtogiat §tmtl rt fht § xmtxytil (BvmU 



HISTORY OF THE REGIMENT, 



PERSONAL HISTORY OF ITS OFFICERS AND ENLISTED MEN. 



Prepared by the Historical Committee op the Regiment. 



PREFATORY LETTER 

From the Historical Committee. 



To the surviving Soldiers and the friends of the deceased Soldiers 
of the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Regiment New York 
Volunteers : 

On the 24th day of June, 1865, a call was issued by Colonel 
Bull and Captains Richardson and Geddis, late of the One 
Hundred and Twenty-sixth New York Volunteers, for a meeting 
to be held at Canandaigua, N. Y., on the 30th day of June, 1865, 
for the purpose of adopting measures to secure the publication of 
a fair and impartial history of the Regiment, and to vindicate its 
character from the unjust charges made against its conduct at the 
battle of Harper's Ferry, in September, 1862. 

The call was fully responded to, and the following resolutions 
were unanimously adopted : 

Resolved, That it is expedient and proper that a history of the 
One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Regiment New York Volunteers, 
be written by or under the supervision of the late officers of the 
Regiment, and that a committee of seven be appointed by the 
chairman (Col. Bull), of which he shall be one, to procure the 
writing and publication of such history. 

That this committee he also intrusted with the business of 
obtaining redress on account of the untrue charges made against 
the Regiment for its conduct on .Maryland Heights, on the 13th of 
September, 1862, and that they take measures to vindicate its 
character against those calumnious charges which were made and 
supported by men who sought to screen themselves by convicting 
this Uegimcnt of their own criminal conduct. 

That all mem Iters and friends of the Regiment, who have in their 
possession or under their control, any books, memoranda, docu- 
ments or other papers relating to its operations, be and hereby 



302 126th Regiment New York Volunteers 

are requested to forward the same, or proper extracts therefrom, to 
the chairman or to any member of the committee, for use in pre- 
paring the contemplated history. 

That the proceedings of this meeting be published in all the 
papers in the district in which the Regiment was raised. 

The following officers were appointed the historical committee 
under the resolution : 

Colonel James M. Bull, Chaplain T. Spencer Harrison, Cap- 
tain C. A. Richardson, Captain T. E. Munson, Lieutenant T. R. 
Lounsbury, Adjutant John F Randolph and Lieutenant Samuel 
Hughes. 

The committee immediately entered upon their duties, and 
took steps to procure all the information that could be obtained. 
The Company books of all the Companies of the Regiment, which 
had been turned over to the Quartermaster's department, on the 
discharge of the Regiment, were obtained through the courtesy of 
the mustering and disbursing officer at Elmira ; and all the regi- 
mental books and orders were procured, and the monthly reports 
of the Regiment during its whole term of service, and the retained 
muster rolls of most of the Companies and other valuable regi- 
mental and company papers were secured, and competent clerks 
were put to work under the superintendence of Adjutant Ran- 
dolph, and full copies of the company books were made in appro- 
priate blank books ; and the valuable information collected from 
the books and papers was entered under a suitable arrangement 
for a ready reference. Notices were published in all the papers 
soliciting diaries, memorandum books, letters and papers of the 
soldiers of the Regiment, and also asking each to write out his 
personal recollections and his personal history ; and so far as the 
addresses of the late members of the Regiment were known, special 
letters were written, soliciting information. Public documents 
and military reports relating to the war were obtained, and, in 
fine, no source of information was neglected. 

For more than a year unsuccessful efforts were made to obtain 
a copy of the testimony given before the Harper's Ferry Investi- 
gating Commission, which tried and convicted the Regiment of 
cowardice, without the opportunity of the officers of the Regiment 
being heard or informed that they were on trial; but finally, 
through the personal efforts of Colonel Dknnis, a warm friend of 



Prefatory Letter. 303 

the Regiment, a copy of the testimony was obtained, and that, 
too, was added to the valuable information already secured. 

Thus, for three years, materials for the history were being 
collected, when upon the earnest solicitation of the active mem- 
bers of the committee, Mrs. A. M. Willson, of Canandaigua, 
kindly consented to undertake the task of writing the general 
history of the Regiment ; of shaping the materials and erecting 
them into a structure of symmetrical proportions. 

This task she has performed to the entire satisfaction of the 
committee, who had but little anticipated the time and labor 
required to bring order, form and beauty out of the crude and 
disjointed materials they had furnished. 

The appendix has been prepared principally by Doctor C. S. 
Hoyt, and Captain C. A. Richardson, assisted by Cajitain T. E. 
Muntson, and Doctor P. D. Peltier. The biographical sketches 
of the officers were written principally by Captain Richardson. 
The sketch of Captain Herendeen was written by Doctor 
Peltier, and the personal history of the enlisted men was written 
by Doctor Hoyt. 

The facts stated, however, were decided upon by the committee ; 
and in cases where questions arose, the judgment of other officers 
and enlisted men of the Regiment was taken, and where an 
agreement could not be had upon an alleged fact, it was omitted, 
so that if any living member, or the friends of any deceased 
member of the Regiment, shall not find statements or facts they 
desired to have appear, they will know that the omission is not 
on account of any disrespect to such person, or on account of the 
wish of the one writing the sketch, but because it was the judg- 
ment of the committee, and those consulted, that the omission 
should be made. The committee confidently hope that the state- 
ment of facts in the personal sketches will be found correct in 
every case ; but they very much regret that many living soldiers, 
and friends of the deceased soldiers of the Regiment, failed to 
furnish them with the facts necessary to make the personal history 
as complete in every case as desired. 

Of the original historical committee, appointed in 186.5, Colonel 
James M. Bull, died in 1867, Chaplain Harrison, Adjutant Ran- 
dolph and Lieutenant Lounsrury removed, in 1866, to places too 
far distant to take any further active part in the work of the 



304 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

committee, and Lieutenant Hughes was so engaged in business, 
a portion of the time out of the State, that he could not give 
the committee his time. But Doctor Hoyt, at the solicitation 
of the committee, early gave his attention to the work of 
collecting facts for the personal history, and he has labored 
efficiently as one of the committee, and Doctor Peltiee and 
Major Phillips have also rendered valuable assistance in the 
work. The acting committee have faithfully tried to fulfill the 
trust reposed in them by their brother officers, and although their 
duties have been onerous and have consumed much valuable time, 
yet if the result of their labors shall receive the approbation of their 
surviving comrades in arms, and meet the expectations of the 
friends of the Regiment, they will feel fully repaid for their services. 

CaxandaiCtUA, January 3d, 1870. 

C. A. RICHARDSON, 

T. E. MUNSON, 
C. S. HOYT, 
P. D. PELTIER, 
P D. PHILLIPS, 

Acting Historical Committee. 



CHRONOLOGICAL RECORD 



126th REGIMENT NEW YORK STATE VOLUNTEERS. 



This Regiment was raised, in 1862, in the counties of Ontario, 
Seneca and Yates (the twenty-sixth senatorial district), under the 
call for 300,000 men issued by the President on the 1st day of 
July, 1862. On the 2d day of July, 1862, Governor E. D. Mor- 
gan issued a proclamation, under the President's call, for the 
raising of the quota of this State. Subsequently an order was 
issued by the Governor fixing the quotas of the several counties 
of the State, and requiring a Regiment to be raised in each sena- 
torial district ; and a War Committee was appointed by the Gov 
ernor for every such district, which should have charge of 
recruiting the Regiment of that district, and recommend the pro- 
per persons to officer it. On the 11th of July, a meeting of the 
War Committee, which was appointed by the Governor for the 
twenty-sixth senatorial district, was held at Geneva, consisting of 
the following gentlemen: 

From Ontario County. — Honorable C. J. Folcee, Geo. B. 
Desixbeere, S. S. Cobb, J. S. Lewis, Piiineas Peouty, Honora- 
ble E. B. Pottle, Ciiaim.es Cov, J. M. Bum,, Wm. IIildreth, 
E. (.4. Latham, II. O. Ciieseheo, A. Kemisall and R. M. 

(4l!EEX. 

From. Sunci'a Count//. — W Joiinsox, J. T. Miller, O. S 
Latham, L. B. Howell, T. Fat/.in<;kr, Wm. Knox, Honorable 
C. S. IIadley, Honorable J Die .Mori', I). ]). Leplee, D. C. 
Wiikhler, D. W W Wiieki.ki; and A. Duxlap. 

Frot// ] r 'a/rs Count//. — Hon. I). A. Ochlx, Morets Browx, 
S. C. Cleveland, M. II. Lawkkxoe, C. S. IIoyt, General A. F 
Wihttaker and Judge A. I'" BiM<a;s. 

Honorable Charles J. Foi.her, of Geneva, was the first, choice 



306 120th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

of the committee for Colonel of the new Regiment, but he 
declined and Honorable D. A. Ogden, of Penn Yan, was selected, 
but he, also, declined ; then, Honorable Eliakim Sheeeill, of 
Geneva, was chosen, and, having accepted, was duly authorized 
by the Governor to recruit the Regiment, and to command the 
camp for rendezvous at Geneva. 

Recruiting commenced immediately, and the rendezvous was 
opened at Camp Swift, Geneva, on the 4th of August, 1862. 

Wednesday, August 20th, 1862. — The Regiment was organized. 

Friday, August 22d. — Regiment mustered into the United 
States service. 

Tuesday, August 26th. — Regiment left Geneva. 

Thursday, August 28th. — Regiment arrived at Harper's Ferry 
in the morning. 

Saturday, Sunday and Monday, September 13th, 14th and 
15th. — In action at Harper's Ferry. 

Monday, September 15th. — Surrendered and paroled. 

Tuesday, September 16th. — Left Harper's Ferry for Annapolis, 
Maryland. 

Sunday, September 21st. — Arrived at Annapolis. 

Wednesday, September 24th. — Left Annapolis for Chicago. 

Saturday, September 2) th, — Arrived at Chicago. 

Wednesday, November 19th. — The New York paroled troops 
received notice of their having been exchanged, and ordered to 
Washington. 

Monday, November 24th. — Regiment left Chicago for Wash- 
ington. 

Thursday, November 21 th. — Arrived at Washington, D. C. 

Friday, November 28<A.— Marched to Arlington Heights. 

Tuesday, December 2d. — Regiment re-armed. 

Wednesday, December 3d. — Moved to Union Mills, and remained 
there, doing picket duty, during the winter. 

1863. 

Friday, January 9th, — General Alex. Hays took command of 
the Brigade. 

Wednesday, January, 1th. — Colonel Sheeeill (who had been 
absent, from wounds) rejoined the Regiment for duty. 

Tuesday, March 24th, — Regiment moved to Centreville. 



Chuoxological Record. 307 

Sunday, June 14th. — The advance of the Army of the Potomac, 
moving toward Pennsylvania, reached Centreville. 

Wednesday, June 24th. — The 3d Brigade of Abercrombie's 
Division, 22d Army Corps, ordered to march. 

Thursday, June 25th. — Brigade broke camp and joined the 3d 
Division, 2d Army Corps, and encamped at Gum Springs, Va.; 
Colonel Willard, of the 125th New York Volunteers, command- 
ing the Brigade, and Brigadier-General Hays the Division. 

Friday, June 26th.— Crossed the Potomac at Edward's Ferry, 
and went into camp the next morning. 

Saturday, June 21th. — Marched to Sugar Loaf Mountain, Md., 
and encamped for the night. 

Sunday, June 28th. — Marched to Monocacy, and encamped for 
the night. 

Monday, June 29th. — Marched to Uniontown, Md., via Liberty, 
Johnsville and Union Bridge, thirty-three miles, and encamped 
for the night. 

Tuesday, June 30th. — Remained in camp with the entire corps. 

Wednesday, Jidy 1st. — Marched via Taneytown to within six 
miles of Gettysburg, and halted until daylight on the morning 
of the second. 

Thursday, July 2d. — Marched to Gettysburg and went into 
position in line of battle at 8 o'clock, a. m. In action at Gettys- 
burg, Pa., July 2d and 3d, and engaged as skirmishers July 
4th. 

Sunday, July 5th. — Left Gettysburg in the afternoon and 
moved to Two Taverns. 

Tuesday, July 1th. — Marched to Taneytown. 

Wednesday, July 8th. — Marched to within five miles of Frede- 
rick. 

Thursday, July 9th. — Marched through Frederick on the way 
to Williamsport, Md. 

Friday, July 10th. — Passed Crampton's Gap, South Mountairr. 

Saturday, July 11th. — Crossed Antietam creek and battle-field. 

Sunday, July 12th. — Went with the entire army into line of 
battle before the enemy near Williamsport, Md. 

Monday, July 13th. — Intrenched in line of battle. 

Tuesday, July 14(7;. — Advanced and found that the enemy had 
crossed the Potomac. 
2(» 



308 12Gth Regiment Kew York Volunteers. 

Wednesday, July loth.— Marched to Harper's Ferry along the 
east bank of the Potomac. 

Thursday, July lQth.— Passed Harper's Ferry around Mary- 
land Heights, and went into camp at Sandy Hook. 

Friday, July llth.— Army supplied with clothing and muni- 
tions. 

Saturday, July 18th— Marched into Loudon Valley crossing 
the Potomac and Shenandoah via Harper's Ferry. 

Sunday, July 19th.— March continued, arriving at Manassas 
Gap, July 23d. 

Friday, Jidy 2-Lth.— Marched back through Manassas Gap and 
encamped for the night. 

Saturday, July 25th. — Marched to White Plains, where rations 
were issued. Several men captured by guerrillas. 

Sunday, July 26th. — Marched through Warrenton and encamp- 
ed near Warrenton Junction, twenty-five miles. Hot and dry, 
many fatal cases of sunstroke. Remained in camp three days, 
received mail, and sent the sick to general hospital. 

Thursday, July 30th. — Marched to Elk Run and remained 
there on picket duty. Weather oppressive, and much sickness. 

Saturday, August 8th. — Brigadier-General Joshua T. Owen 
.assumed command of the Brigade. 

Monday, August 31st. — Moved with the Division to Hart- 
wood Church to support cavalry reconnoissance, and returned 
September 2d. 

Saturday, September 12th.— Broke camp and marched to Rap- 
pahannock Station. Sick sent to general hospital. 

Sunday, September 13th. — Crossed the Rappahannock and sup- 
ported the cavalry, who met the enemy at Brandy Station, and 
drove them to near Cedar Mountain. Encamped at Culpepper 
Court-house. 

Wednesday, September 16th. — Marched to Cedar Mountain and 
encamped for the night. 

Thursday, September 11th. — Marched to Robinson's river and 
went on picket, and remained there on that duty till relieved by 
the 6th Corps, October 5th. 

Tuesday, October Qth. — Marched to Culpepper Court-house and 
went into camp. 

Saturday, October 10th. — Broke camp and went into line of 



Cheoxologwal Record. 309 

battle west of Culpepper, facing the Blue Ridge, and bivouacked 
for the night. The Army of the Potomac in retreat. 

Sunday, October llth. — Marched to Bealton via Rappahan- 
nock Station. 

Monday, October 12th. — The trains of the army parked at 
Bealton Station. Brigade on picket. 

Tuesday, October 13th. — Marched to Auburn Ford via War- 
renton Junction and Warrenton railroad to Three Mile Station 
and encamped for the night. 

Wednesday, October 14th. — Engaged in action at Auburn Ford 
in the morning, and marched via Catlett's Station to Bristow Sta- 
tion, and engaged there in action until dark. At 9 p. m. resumed 
march for the heights of Centreville, arriving there at 3 a. m. on 
the 15 th, crossing Bull Run at Mitchell's Ford. Went into posi- 
tion to meet an attack from the enemy's cavalry. 

Monday, October 19th. — Recrossed Bull Run and marched to 
Bristow Station. 

Tuesday, October 20th. — Marched to near Auburn and encamped. 

Friday, October 23d. — Marched to the railroad near Warren- 
ton, and went into camp. 

Saturday, November 1th. — Broke camp and marched to Kelly's 
Ford, the whole army advancing upon the enemy on the Rappa- 
hannock. Men with eight days' rations, sixty rounds of cartridges, 
and full supply of winter clothing. 5th and 6th Corps surprise 
the enemy at Rappahannock Station, capture four pieces of artil- 
lery and 1,100 prisoners, and cross the river. The :>d Corps, 
being in advance, cross at Kelly's Ford and capture 800 prisoners. 

Sunday, November 8th. — Crossed the Rappahannock at Kellv's 
Ford, and moved with the entire army, supporting the cavalry 
which, with sharp fighting, drove the enemy past Culpepper Court- 
house. Encamped at Brandy Station. This is the third crossim-' 
of the Rappahannock on Sunday by the Corps, with intervals of 
four weeks each. 

Tiuxdny, Novembrr 10th. Marched to Milton's Mills and went 
into camp. 

Tuesday, November lith. — Orders received last ni^ht to 
advance with the army across the Rapidan, but rain setting in, 
the orders were countermanded. 

Thursday, November iiith. — Thanksgiving day. Marched at 



310 126th Regiment New York Volunteers 

half past six a. m. to cross the Rapidan. At sunrise General 
Grant's announcement of the great victories at Lookout Moun- 
tain, Chickamauga and Missionary Ridge were read to the army. 
Crossed the Rapidan at Germania Ford, on a pontoon bridge ; 
advanced four miles on plank road, and bivouacked for the 
night. 

Friday, November 21th. — Marched at sunrise, along a by-road, 
through a dense pine thicket, to the Fredericksburg and Orange 
Court-house plank road ; then rapidly to Robinson's Tavern, at 
10 a. m., where skirmishing with the enemy at once commenced, 
and continued all day. 

Saturday, November 28th. — Advanced two miles in line of bat- 
tle ; found the enemy along a ridge across Mine Run. Heavy 
cannonading and sharp skirmishing through the day. Regiment 
go on picket along the run at night. 

Sunday, November 29th. — Relieved by the 5th Corps. The 2d 
Corps, and 3d Division of the 6th Corps, under General Warren, 
moved to the left, and took position on the enemy's right, under 
an artillery fire, and lay in line for the night. 

Monday, November 30th. — Reinforced by 3d Division 3d Corps ; 
moved forward and massed in column by Regiment, under orders 
to charge the enemy's right. The enemy being found in a posi- 
tion strongly intrenched, the order to charge was countermanded. 
Cannonading along the entire line. Remained in position till 
night, when the Regiment was moved to the left on picket. The 
night was intensely cold. 

Tuesday, December 1st. — On picket till four p. m., when relieved 
by details from the other Regiments of the Brigade. At eight 
p. m. took up line of march to recross the Rapidan via New Hope 
Church and Parker's Store, and through the "Wilderness ; march- 
ing all night. 

Wednesday, December 2d. — Recrossed the Rapidan at Culpep- 
per or Gold Mine Ford, at eight a. m., and halted at half past 
eight for breakfast and rest. Resumed march at half past one p. 
m, and at seven p. m. arrived at the old camp at Milton's Mills. 

Thursday, December 3d. — Entire army in camp as before the 
advance. 

Saturday, December oth. — Broke camp and moved to Stevens- 
burg. 



Chronological Record. 311 

Monday, December 1th. — Broke camp at 8 a. m., and moved to 
Dumpling Mountain, three miles east of Culpepper Court-house, 
and three miles south of Brandy Station, and went into winter 
quarters. 

1864. 

Friday, January 1st. — Regiment comfortably quartered in 
log huts ; in good health, and engaged in heavy fatigue and 
picket duty. 

Saturday, February 6th.— Advanced with the Corps, on a 
reconnoissance in force, across the Rapidan, at Morton's Ford, 
and sharply engaged with the enemy during the day. Retired 
across the river after dark, and bivouacked on the left bank. 

Sunday, February 1th. — Returned to camp at night. 

Monday, February 22d. — Washington's birthday. One half of 
the Regiment's term of service expired this day. Day spent as a 
holiday. Brigadier-General Owen delivered an address to the 
Brigade. 

Tuesday, February 23d. — The 2d Corps and cavalry reviewed 
by Major-Gen eral Meade, accompanied by Vice-President Ham- 
lin, Secretary Welles, and other distinguished officers and 
citizens. 

Thursday, Marcli 24th. — General Grant arrived and took up 
his head-quarters with the Army of the Potomac at Culpepper 
Court-house. The army reorganized and consolidated into three 
Corps. The three Divisions of the 2d Corps consolidated into 
two Divisions, and the 1st and 2d Divisions of the 3d Corps 
transferred to the 2d Corps, as the 3d and 4th Divisions of this 
Corps, Major-General Hancock commanding. The "Old Bri- 
gade," consisting of the 39th, the 111th, the 125th and the 120th 
X ew York Volunteers, was assigned to the 1st Division as the 3d 
Brigade, and increased by the addition of the 7th, 52d and 57th 
Xew York Volunteers, and commanded by Colonel Paul Fkank. 
5 2d Xew York; Brigadier-General Fiianois Baklow command- 
ing the Division. 

Monday, .March 2Mh. — The army reinforced by 10,000 heavy 
artillery from the defenses of Washington. 

Friday, April 4th. — One hundred enlisted men and two officers 
detailed from the Regiment as provost-guard at Corps head- 
quarters. 



312 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

Saturday, April 16th. — Brigade reviewed by Brigadier-General 
Barlow. 

Tuesday, April 19th. — Division reviewed by Major-General 
Hancock. 

Friday, Api-il 22d. — The Corps reviewed by Lieutenant-Gene- 
ral Grant. 

Tuesday, May 3d. — Orders to move received at two p. m. 
Broke camp and took up line of march at 10 p. m. 

Wednesday, May 4th. — Crossed the Rapidan at Ely's Ford at 
daylight; marched to Chancellors ville, and encamped at ten a. m. 

Thursday, May 5th. — Marched at six a. m. to Todd's Tavern, 
and the Regiment, with a part of the Brigade, was detached and 
went into line of battle at twelve m., supporting the cavalry, 
which was engaged with the enemy. The balance of the Brigade, 
with the Corps, moved to the right in the Wilderness. At mid- 
night the detachment rejoined the Corps. 

Friday and Saturday, May 6th and 1th. — Engaged in the 
battle of the Wilderness. 

Sunday, May 8th. — Moved to the left and went into line of 
battle, near Todd's tavern. Skirmishing during the day and 
night. 

Monday, May 9th. — At two p. m. marched toward Spottsylva 
nia Court-house, and crossed the Po River, at Tulley's farm, at 
sunset, under a heavy fire, taking position on the extreme right 
of the army. 

Tuesday, May 10th. — Engaged in the battle of Po River. The 
entire army engaged. Over 200 guns on our side in position, 
Terrific cannonading. Fighting constant and losses heavy. 

Wednesday, May 11th. — Sharp skirmishing during the day. 
Communication opened to Fredericksburg, and sick and wounded 
sent to general hospital. The Corps moved to the left center, 
preparatory to making a charge the next morning. 

Thursday, May 12th. — The battle of Spottsylvania fought. At 
four and a half a. m., the Corps was massed and charged the 
enemy's works, capturing the rebel General Johnson, with nearly 
his entire Division, twenty guns and thirty stands of colors. The 
whole army became engaged. 

Friday, May 13th. — Skirmishing during the day and the 
wounded sent to Fredericksburg. 

Saturday, May 14th.— Skirmishing continued. 



Chronological Record. 3L3 

Sunday, May 15th. — The Corps moved to the left and took 
position on the Fredericksburg pike, fronting Spottsylvania Court- 
house. 

Monday, May 1 6 th.— Skirmishing all day; no general engage- 
ment. The army reinforced via Fredericksburg by 24,000 troops, 
mostly heavy artillery. 

Tuesday, May 11th. — Troops changing position. At night the 
Corps withdrew from the line and massed for an attack on the 
position assaulted on the 12th. 

Wednesday, May 18th. — The 1st and 3d Divisions charged the 
enemy's works with heavy loss, and failed to carry the position. 

Thursday, May 19th. — The 1st, 2d and 3d Divisions of the 
Corps, moved to Anderson's Mills and massed in reserve, the 4th 
Division remaining near the Fredericksburg road. At 6 p. m. the 
4th Division was attacked by Ewell, and the other Divisions 
were marched to their support. 

Friday, May 20th. — In reserve during the day at Anderson's 
Mills. At 11 p. m. took up line of march to the left, 1st Division 
in advance. Roads good. 

Saturday, May 21st. — Marched all last night and at daylight 
crossed the Fredericksburg and Richmond railroad at Guiney's 
Station. At 10 a. m. passed Bowling Green. At 2 p. m. arrived 
at Milford's Station. Crossed the Mattapony and intrenched ; the 
Corps on the left of the line. Day intensely hot. Marched 
twenty-four miles. Heavy cannonading on the right at night. 

Sunday, May 22(7. — In position all day. Slight skirmishing. 
Trains of the army moving to the left, and heavy cannonading to 
the right. Weather still hot. 

Monday, May 2-id. — Moved to the left at 7 A. Jr. and reached 
the Xorth Anna river at 3 p. m., — a march of twelve miles, — and 
skirmished with the enemy. Biknky's Division charged and 
crossed the river. Heavy cannonading. 

Tuesday, May 2\th. — Heavy fighting all day ; the entire army 
engaged, and the river crossed on the right and left; 2d 
Corps on the left. A great rain storm towards night. 

Wvdutsdat/, May 25th. — Skirmishing, but no material change 
of position. General Grant destroys the bridge across the river 
and tears up several miles of railroad to the rear. 

Vhursthiy, May 2iith. — Skirmishing during the day. At night 
the army in motion toward the left. 



314 126tb Regiment Nevt York Volunteers. 

Friday, May 21th. — March to the left continued, 2d Corps 
bring up the rear. Weather hot. 

Saturday, May 28th. — Marched to the Pamunkey and crossed 
at Nelson's Ferry, four miles above Hanovertown and intrenched 
three miles south of the river. 

Sunday, May 29th. — Advanced and met the enemy near the 
Tolopotomy and intrenched. Sharp skirmishing and cannona- 
ding. 

Monday, May 30th. — Fighting and sharp skirmishing along 
the line. The Regiment advance and cross the Tolopotomy 
under a sharp fire, and gain the heights beyond and hold them till 
night. Relieved at dark and retire to the works previously held. 

Tuesday, May 3lst. — Sharp skirmishing and fighting continued. 
At night the 6th Corps moved to the left, leaving the 2d Corps 
on the right of the line. 

Wednesday, June 1st. — Skirmishing and cannonading all day 
At 6 p. m. heavy fighting commenced and continued till dark, 2d 
Division suffering severely. At 9 p. m. left our works and 
marched to the left. 

Thursday, June 2d. — Marched all last night, and arrived at 
Cold Harbor early in the morning, dusty, tired and sleepy. In 
the afternoon went into position on the left of the army. Fight- 
ing all day. Communication opened with White House, on 
the Pamunkey. 

Friday, June 3d. — Repeated charges and counter charges made 
throughout the day. Terrific fighting and fearful losses. The 
Brigade in reserve early in the morning, but under fire ; and in 
the forenoon went into position on the extreme left of the line and 
intrenched. Remained intrenched, under fire, doing picket duty 
and engaged in mining and fortifying till the army moved. 

Tuesday June 1th. — Suspension of hostilities from six to eight 
p. m., for removal of the wounded between the lines, and burial of 
the dead. 

Sunday, June 12th. — Continued fortifying till night, when the 
army retired from before Cold Harbor. The Corps massed in 
rear of the works. 

Monday, June 13th. — The Corps took up its line of marcli at 
one a. m. ; crossed the Chickahominy at Long Bridge, and 
marched to the heights, two miles from James river, opposite 



Chronological Record. 315 

Windmill point, and near Charles City Court-house, and 
intrenched, facing to the rear. 

Tuesday, June 14t/i. — Colonel Paul Fraxk released from 
arrest and restored to the command of the Brigade. Orders 
received at night to be ready to cross James river. 

Wednesday, June 15th. — Moved at half past two a. m. and 
crossed on steam transports at "Windmill point, at daylight; 
marched one and one-half miles and halted till quarter past one 
p. m. for rations, then marched rapidly some miles, then counter- 
marched and took another road, and arrived in front of Peters- 
burg at midnight. 

Thursday, June 16tk. — At half past two a. m. moved to the 
front and left of Petersburg and halted. At six p. m. moved one 
mile to the right and charged the enemy's works in front of 
Petersburg, driving them from their first line. Colonel Baied 
killed. 

Friday, June 17th. — Fighting all day; the Regiment under 
fire ; communication opened with City Point, and sanitary and 
other stores brought up. Regiment acting as provost guard, 
under fire all day. Losses of the Corps for three days, 3,500. 
Over 1,000 killed and wounded in the 1st Division. 

Sunday, June 19th. — All quiet along the lines except skirmish- 
ing. "Wounded sent to City Point. 

Monday, June 20th, — Skirmishing. 

Tuesday, June 21st. — Corps moved to the left, crossing the 
Jerusalem plank road, to the south of Petersburg, and intrenched, 
the 6th Corps on the left. 

Wednesday, June 22d. — Division advanced beyond the intrench- 
ments, and were met by the enemy in force, who struck the left 
flank and drove the Division back in disorder to its intrench- 
ments. Captain Monnis Bnowx, commanding the Regiment, 
killed, and several of the Regiment killed and wounded. 

Thursday, June 2:W. — Skirmishing. Sick and wounded sent to 
City Point. Weather extremely hot. Positions of the Corps of 
the army from right to left, as follows : 9th, 18th, 5th, '2d, and 
• ith Corps. 

Tuesday, June 28th. — Practice of bursting a shell over the city 
of Petersburg, every fifteen minutes, commenced. 

J/<>/iday, July 4th. — Quiet alonoj the entire line. A national 



316 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

salute of 34 shotted guns fired into Petersburg at sunrise. Wea- 
ther extremely hot, and water scarce. 

Friday, July 8th. — Sixth Corps left for Washington ; 2d 
Corps extended into the works of the 6th. Troops engaged in 
building works and roads. 

Tuesday, July 12th. — Rumors of the Corps being moved to 
Washington. Hospitals broken up. Sick and wounded sent to 
City Point. 

Saturday, July 16th. — the rear lines of Union works leveled. 
The Corps changed to the front of Petersburg, to the right of 5th 
Corps, which was extended to the left. Division hospital estab- 
lished at the Burchett House, in rear of Army head-quarters. 

Monday, July 25th. — At 2 p. m. the Corps moved out and 
crossed the Appomattox, at Point of Pocks, marching all 
night. 

Tuesday, July 26th. — Crossed the north side of the James 
River, at Deep Bottom, early in the morning. Engaged in the 
battle of Deep Bottom all day. 

Friday July 29th. — Re-crossed the James and marched toward 
Petersburg. 

Saturday, July 30th. — Arrived in front of Petersburg at four 
a. m. Mine exploded. Re-occupied the old line in the afternoon. 

Monday, August 1st. — Suspension of firing from 5th to 9th, 
under flag of truce, to bury the dead. 

Tuesday, August 9th. — Ordnance boat, with ammunition, at 
City Point, blown up. 

Friday, August 12th. — At three p. m. the Corps moved out of 
its works again and marched to City Point, arriving at nine p. m. 
Sick and wounded sent to hospital at City Point. 

Saturday, August 13th. — Embarked on transports at four p. m., 
and moved down the river till after dark ; then turned and passed 
up the river. 

Sunday, August 14th. — Disembarked at Deep Bottom at day- 
light. Reinforced by the 1 Oth Corps. Engaged in the battle of 
Strawberry Plains. 

Monday, August 15th. — Manoeuvring and skirmishing. The 
line advanced. General Grant inspects the lines. 

Tuesday, August 16th. — Heavy fighting; a temporary advance 
made to within six miles of Richmond. Severe losses. 



Chronological Record. 317 

Wednesday, August 11th. — Skirmishing during the day. 
Wounded sent to City Point. At five p. m. a terrific fire opened 
from the gun boats and monitors on the rebel lines and land bat- 
teries, and continued until dark. 

Thursday, August 18th. — At one a. m. a heavy cannonading 
opened along the entire line from Richmond to Petersburg, con- 
tinuing furiously till daylight. At six p. m. the enemy spitefully 
attacked our lines at Deep Bottom, and a sharp engagement con- 
tinued for an hour, resulting in heavy losses on both sides. 

Friday, August 19th. — Wounded sent to City Point. 

Saturday, August 20th. — Four p. m. Sick sent to City Point. 
At dark, moved out of the works and marched toward Peters- 
burg. 

Sunday, August 21st. — Marched all night, arriving in front of 
Petersburg at four a. m. At eight a. m. heavy fighting near the 
Weldon railroad by the 5th Corps. The 2d Corps marched to 
their support. 

Monday, August 22d. — Engaged in tearing up the Weldon 
railroad toward Reams' Station. 

Tuesday, August 23d. — Continued tearing up railroad. 

Wednesday, August 2Xth. — Intrenched at Reams' Station, and 
continue to destroy the railroad south of that point. 

Thursday, August 25th. — Skirmishing till four p. m., when the 
enemy attacked iu force. Battle raged till dark. Losses on both 
sides heavy. At eight p. m. the Corps withdrew from Reams' 
Station and went into position on the left of the 5th Corps, in the 
works formerly occupied by the 6th, near the Williams' House. 

Friday, August 2iith. — Corps remained in position. Wounded 
sent to City Point. 

Saturday, August 2lt!t. — The Corps, except the 2d Division, 
returned to the front of Petersburg, and occupied its former 
works, under a furious cannonading, which continued until mid- 
night. The Division hospital re-opened at the Burchett House. 

Sunday, S<>pte>nlur -It/i. — The capture of Atlanta by Sherman 
officially announced in General Orders at dress parade. At mid- 
night a shotted salute fired at the enemy, accompanied with music 
from all the bands. The fire was vigorously replied to by the 
enemy, and a heavy cannonading continued till two a. m. The 
awful roar of artillery, the bursting of shells, and whistling of 



318 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

shot, with the music of the bands heard at intervals; and added 
to all the fire pouring forth from a thousand pieces of heavy ord- 
nance, and flashing from bursting shells, i;>resented a scene whose 
grandeur was almost overwhelming. 

Monday, September 5th. — The 1st Division was moved to the 
left of the 5th Corps, near the Williams' House, to guard the left 
flank. Hospital moved to an open field, near the Norfolk railroad. 

Thursday, September 8th. — Balance of Corps moved to the left 
and joined the 1st Division in support of the 5th Corps. Heavy- 
artillery firing along the whole line. 

Saturday, September 10th. — A portion of the lines of the Corps 
advanced, with loss, in prisoners, to the enemy, who attacked in 
return, and was repulsed. Government railroad completed from 
City Point to the Yellow Tavern on the Weldon railroad. Divi- 
sion hospital re-established at the Burchett House. 

Thursday, September loth. — 2d Corps, being relieved by the 
10th Corps, re-occupied its former line in front of Petersburg. 

Tuesday, September 20th. — At four a. m., a shotted salute, in 
honor of Sheridan's victory in the Shenandoah valley was fired 
at the enemy, resulting in a fierce artillery duel along the whole 
line. 

Thursday, September 29th. — The 10th and 18th Corps moved 
to the north of the James ; and the 2d, 5th and 9th Corps held 
ready to move at a moment's notice. Army head-quarters 
packed, and army trains ready to move. Sick and wounded sent 
to City Point. 

Friday, September 30th. — Heavy cannonading heard north of 
the James. Warren, by the aid of the 9th Corps, extended the 
lines to the left and southwest, four and a half miles, and 
intrenched. At night the enemy charged the lines of the V<\ 
Corps, and were repulsed, with heavy loss. 

Saturday, October 1st. — Cannonading and sharp skirmishing 
along the whole line. Our lines extended on the right toward 
Richmond. Our left attacked, but Warren maintains his posi- 
tion. Division hospital established at Epps' house, near Mead's 
Station. 

Sunday, October 2d. — The 2d Corps sent to the left to support 
Warren, except the 1st Division, which is extended alono- the 
line occupied by the whole Corps. Warren attempted an 



Chronological Record. 319 

advance, but was repulsed. Army head-quarters moved to the 
left, and established near the Weldon railroad. 

Thursday, October 6th.— The balance of the Corps returned to 
their works in front of Petersburg. 

Friday, October 1th. — Heavy fighting north of the James. 

Tuesday, October 11th. — Quiet during the day. Unusually 
heavy cannonading and mortar firing at night along the whole line. 

Tuesday, October 18th. — The enemy attempted to advance 
their lines in front of the 2d Corps, and were repulsed. Heavy 
cannonading. 

Friday, October 21st. — At sunset, a shotted salute fired in 
honor of Sheridan's victory, on the 19th, in the Shenandoah 
valley, and another artillery duel was the result. The army was 
heavily reinforced by recruits. 

Wednesday, October 26th. — The Corps, except the 1st Division, 
was withdrawn from the line, and sent to the left. The railroad 
abandoned, and the pickets withdrawn from the rear. The army 
and hospital trains sent within the fortifications at City Point. 
The 1st Division received twenty days rations, and a large supply 
of ammunition, and occupied the whole Corps line, under orders 
to hold it at all hazards against attacks from front or rear. 

Thursday, October 21th. — Severe fighting at the left. The 
battle of Boydton plank road. Terrific cannonading on the left 
from 9 a. m. until dark. At 10 p. m. a portion of the 1st Division 
advanced, under a heavy artillery fire, and captured a fort, with 
a number of prisoners ; but, for want of sufficient force, the fort 
was abandoned. 

F'iday, October 28th. — The other Divisions of the Corps 
returned to their works. 

Saturday, October 29th. — Army and hospital trains return from 
City Point. Pear picket line re-established, and railroad trains 
again moving. Division hospital established near Corps head- 
quarters, near Avery House. 

Monthly, October 31st. — The 1st Division relieved from duty 
on the line and placed in reserve. 

Sunday, November 6th. — At one, a. m., the enemy attacked and 
captured the '2d Division picket line, in front of Fort Hell; a sharp 
engagement ensued. The 1st Division moved up for support. The 
line was recaptured. 



320 126th Regime xt New York Volunteers. 

Thursday, November 24th. — Thanksgiving day observed. The 
army feasted on turkeys, chickens, and other supplies bountifully 
furnished by the north. 

Saturday, November 26th. — Major-General Hancock transfer- 
red to the Department of Washington. Major-General Humphrey 
took command of the Corps. 

Monday, November 28th. — Troops moving to the left. Among 
them several Regiments of colored troops. HeaAy firing kept up 
during the night. 

| ^Tuesday, November 29th. — In the morning, the 1st Division 
was moved to the left, and relieved the 9th Corps. In the after- 
noon, the balance of the 2d Corps relieved the 9th Corps, moved 
to the left, and joined the 1st Division. At the commencement 
of these movements, the enemy opened a spiteful artillery fire ; 
and heavy cannonading and mortar firing was kept up all day. 

Wednesday, November 30th. — Corps and hospital trains moved 
to the left. All the Division hospitals of the Corps established 
at Patrick's Station, the terminus of the railroad. 

Thursday, December 1st. — The Corps commenced preparation 
for winter quarters, pursuant to orders from army head-quarters. 

Tuesday, December 6tk. — The 6th Corps rejoin the Army of 
the Potomac, and occupy a position at the right of the 2d Corps. 
The 5th Corps and the 3d Division of the 2d Corps, under General 
Warren, moved south on a raid down the Weldon railroad. 

Friday, December 9th. — A portion of the 1st Division of the 
2d Corps, and a portion of the 6th Corps, under General Miles, 
made a demonstration towards Southside railroad; crossed 
Hatcher's run, driving the enemy before them; advanced to 
Gravelly run, and bivouacked in a storm of hail and snow. The 
Regiment held the whole Brigade line; one Regiment in each 
Brigade being detailed to hold the line of each Brigade. 

Sunday, December 25th. — In comfortable winter quarters. 
Ground frozen and covered with snow. Weather cold. All quiet 
along the lines. The sick in hospital supplied by the medical 
purveyor of the army with poultry, fruits, vegetables, and deli- 
cacies, in abundance. 



Chronological Record. 821 

1865. 

Sunday, January 1st, — Quiet continues along the lines, except 
in front of the 9th Corns. Weather cold, ground frozen and 
covered Avith snow. 

Sunday, January 8?//.— Deserters from the enemy, in large 
numbers, have come in nearly every night for the past twenty days. 

Friday, January 13^..— Weather has changed from cold to 
warm, with heavy rains. Heavy cannonading on the right, quiet 
in front. 

Sunday, January 15th. — Weather mild and pleasant. The 
Division hospitals inspected by Major-General Humphreys, and 
the general and medical officers of the Corps. 

Friday, January 20th.— Desertions from the enemy continue. 
Heavy cannonading on the right and in front of Petersburg. 

Tuesday, January 24th. — Rebel rams and gunboats came down 
the James river, threatening City Point. The Corps under march- 
ing orders. 

Tuesday, January 31st. — The whole army received marching 
orders. Petersburg shelled. Heavy cannonading. Sick and 
wounded sent to City Point. 

Sunday, February 5th. — The cavalry, the 5th Corps, and 2d and 
3d Divisions of the 2d Corps, moved to the left, toward Southside 
railroad, and engaged the enemy across Hatcher's run. The 1st 
Division held the Corps line. Weather cold and snowing fast. 

Thursday, February 9th. — Fighting across Hatcher's run con- 
tinued. Our lines were advanced, and Wahhex intrenched him- 
self firmly, and held his position. The 2d and 3d Divisions of 
the 2d Corps returned to their former positions. 

February -lid. — A salute of 100 shotted guns fired into Peters- 
burg, in honor of Washington's birthday, and the fall of Charles- 
ton. Heavy rains. Deserters from the enemy in large numbers. 
Over 400 took the oath of allegiance on this day. Military rail- 
road extended to Hatcher's run from the Yellow Tavern. 

Wednesday, Marcli 1st. — Heavy rains continue. No armv 
movements. 

7'msdai/, Marcli 14th. — Sick and wounded sent to general 
hospital. Sutlers and citizens ordered out of the army lines. 
Surplus baggage ordered to be sent away. The armv put in 
marching condition. Weather fine and warm. Roads good. 



222 126th Regiment Ne~\y York Volunteers. 

Saturday, March 25th. — The enemy attacked and captured 
Fort Steadman, on the line of the 9th Corps, at 4 a. m. ; but it 
was immediately recaptured with 1,758 rebel prisoners. At the 
same time the 6th, 2d and 5th Corps charged and captured the 
rebel picket line in their front, intrenched and held it. A gene- 
ral engagement ensued, lasting until dark. Our army captured 
this day 2,800 prisoners and ten battle-flags. The loss in the 1st 
Division, 2d Corps, was over 400 ; falling largely on the " Irish 
Brigade." 

Sunday, March 26th. — Wounded sent to City Point. All quiet 
along the lines. 

Monday, March 21th. — President Lincoln, and Generals 
Grant, Sherman and Sheridan held a conference at City Point. 
The enemy attempted to retake the captured picket line in front 
of the 6th Corps, but were repulsed. Each man ordered to have 
four days rations in haversack. 

Tuesday, March 28th. — The 24th Corps crossed to the south 
of the James river, and at night relieved the 2d and 5th Corps. 
The Regiment has seventy-five men present for duty. 

Wednesday, March 29th. — The 2d and 5th Corps, with the 
cavalry, crossed Hatcher's Run, advanced to the Boydton plank- 
road, and extended the line to near Denweddie Court-house, 
driving the enemy before them, with sharp fighting. The Regi- 
ment on the skirmish line from eleven A. m. 

Thursday, March 30th. — Rained hard all night, and until noon 
of this day. Head-quarters of Generals Grant and Meade 
moved across Hatcher's run. The 5th Corps advanced its line 
beyond the Boydton road. The 2d Corps advanced nearly four 
miles beyond Gravelly run. Sheridan engaged the enemy on 
the left at Dinwiddie Court-house. The Regiment still on the 
skirmish line, near the site of Arnold's mill. 

Friday, March 31st. — Morning dark and rainy. At eight a. m. 
heavy fighting commenced, extending from Hatcher's Run to the 
extreme left. The 24th, 2d, 5th and Cavalry Corps engaged. 
The whole line advanced. The 2d Corps intrenching beyond the 
Boydton plank road. The 126th had opportunity to cook rations 
for the first time in three days. Losses in the Corps over 600. 
The 1st Division losing 350. Losses in the Regiment, one killed 
and three officers and several enlisted men wounded. 



Chronological Record. 323» 

Saturday, April 1st. — "Wounded, sent to City Point. Heavy 
fighting along the cavalry line on the left all day. At ten a. ji., 
the 1st Division, under General Miles "was detached and inarched 
to the support of the 5th Corps. At ten p. jr., a terrific cannona- 
ding was opened on the enemy and continued all night. 

Sunday, April 2d. — At four a. m., the enemy made an attack 
along the whole line. The 6th and 9th Corps were massed in 
front of Petersburg, and broke the enemy's line. The 24th, 2d, 
5th and Cavalry Corps advanced upon the left. By ten a. jr. the 
rebel army was in full retreat, the Union forces hotly pursuing. 
The 1st Division, under orders of General Sheridan, marched, at 
daylight, up the White Oak road, toward Petersburg, and 
attacked the enemy there in heavy force, broke his lines, and 
drove him across Hatcher's Run by Sutherland's Depot. General 
Sheridan complimented the Division, and reports his belief that 
if he could have retained this Division he could have crushed the 
enemy at that time at Sutherland's Depot. The Division now 
rejoined the Corps, and the 3d Brigade attacked the enemy in 
their works at Sutherland's Depot, and, after repeated charges, 
carried the enemy's works, and captured several guns and some 
hundreds of prisoners. General Madill, commanding the Bri- 
gade, having been wounded in the second charge, General 
aIacDougal then gallantly led the Brigade, and though he 
received a severe wound in the arm, he still rode his horse and 
kept his command. This was the first time the Southside rail- 
road was cut, except by raiding parties. 

Monday, April 3d. — The enemy in retreat. The Corps pursue 
on the Namazie road toward Amelia Court-house. Fio-htin<r 
with the enemy's rear guard. 

Tuesday, April 4t/i. — Heavy rains. Roads in bad condition. 
The Corps making corduroy mads. Some skirmishing. The 
Regiment was detailed as wagon-guard, and was with the trains 
all day, marching and making corduroy road ; a fatiguing dav's- 
work. 

Wednesday, April 5th. — At four p. m. the Corps arrived at 
Jcttersville, on the Dansville railroad. The 5th and 6th Corps 
within supporting distances, and the cavalry on the left, cutting 
off Lee's course south. 

21 



324 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

Thursday, April 6th. — The army in motion at six a. m. The 
2d Corps pursue the enemy on the Lynchburg turnpike. A sharp 
skirmish at Amelia Springs' House. The Corps marched twenty 
miles this day, and captured 1,000 prisoners, several guns, a large 
quantity of small arms, 400 wagons, including Corps, Division, 
Brigade and ambulance trains, and a half a million dollars of 
confederate currency, just from the press. The 3d Brigade 
pressed closely the enemy's rear all day, causing them to aban 
don several pieces of artillery and a wagon train ; the captured 
commissary stores furnishing the Brigade provisions. The Bri- 
gade encamped near Sailor's Creek. 

Friday, April 1th. — The army in motion at daylight. The 2d 
Corps reached the Lynchburg railroad, at High Bridge, at two 
p. m., and attacked the enemy while they were trying to destroy 
the bridge, drove them from the position, captured sixteen heavy 
guns, and about 500 prisoners ; continued the march along the 
north side of the railroad ; arrived at Farmville at four p. m. ; 
found the enemy intrenched ; fought them until dark and drove 
them again, with a loss to the Coips of about 300 killed and 
wounded, largely from the 1st Division. The Regiment, being 
in the woods and fighting from behind trees, suffered no loss. 
General Smtthe, formerly Colonel 1st Delaware Volunteers, 
killed. The wounded sent to Burkesville Station. 

Saturday, April Sth. — The army in motion at an early hour. 
The Corps continue the pursuit through the day on the Lynch- 
burg pike, with light skirmishing. The Division in advance, and 
the 3d Brigade leading the Division, pressed the enemy's rear all 
day. The Regiment was detailed as flankers, and were in the 
advance and on the left, and captured many rebel stragglers and 
chickens. At seven p. m., as New Store was reached, some rebel 
cavalry were put to flight by the Regiment, and one piece of 
artillery was captured. The enemy were pressed till midnight, 
when a halt was made for rest and rations. 

Sunday, April 9t7t. — The pursuit continued from four a. m. till 
near noon, when the column was halted near Appomattox Court- 
house, and a flag of truce from Lee was sent to Grant request- 
ing an interview for the purpose of surrendering his army. In 
the afternoon the surrender of Lee's army commenced. At five 
p. m. General Meade rides along the lines of the army. Bands 



Chronological Record. 325 

are playing, drums beating, and the artillery firing salutes, with 
blank cartridges. The wildest enthusiasm prevails. Men 
embrace. Color-bearers, waving their colors, are caught up and 
borne on men's shoulders. Cheers rise, in a swelling chorus, 
along the lines of the army, and roll back and forth and reverbe- 
rate through the forests and fields. Rain fell all night. 

Monday, April 10th. — A rainy day. The army rest. The 
rebel army being paroled and furnished with rations. 

Tuesday, April 11th. — At ten a. m. the army took up its line 
of march to Burkesville by different routes. The 2d and 6th 
Corps moved on the Lynchburg pike. The latter Corps in 
advance. Encamped for the night at New Store. Rain con- 
tinued. Roads in bad condition. 

Wednesday, April 12th. — Marched at five a. m. Encamped for 
the night at Farmville. Roads nearly impassable. 

Thursday, Apjril 13th. — It rained all night. Sick sent to rebel 
hospital at Farmville. Marched at seven a. m., and advanced but 
five miles. Encamped for the night. Roads growing worse. 

Friday, Apyril 14th. — Marched at four a. m. Reached Burkes- 
ville at eleven a. m., and went into camp. Communication 
opened with Petersburg, and supplies and mails received. 

Sunday, April 16th. — The assassination of President Lincoln 
officially announced to the army. 

Tuesday, April 18th. — The Division changes camp to the south 
of Burkesville, along the Dansville railroad. Division hospital 
established at the Miller House. The Regiment fixed up a Aery 
nice camp ; drew new clothes ; drilled enough for exercise, and 
enjoyed themselves much while here. 

Wednesday, April 19th. — The occasion of the funeral obsequies 
of the President observed throughout the army. 

Sunday, April 23d. — The 6th Corps detached from the Army 
of the Potomac, and march for Danville, N. CI 

Tuesday, J fay 2d. — Broke camp and marched toward Rich- 
mond. 

Saturday, J/ay 6th. — Arrived at Broad Rock race course in 
the morning, and halted two miles from Manchester. 

Sunday, May 1th. — Resumed the march, and passed through 
Richmond. The Regiment greeted by the 14sth New York 
Volunteers. It being the first time the two Regiments had met 



326 12Gth Regiment Xew York Volunteers. 

while in the service. Weather hot. March rapid and exhaust- 
ing. 

Wednesday, May llt/t. — Passed through Fredericksburg. 

Sunday, May 14th. — Arrived near Alexandria, and went into 
camp. 

Tuesday, May 16th. — Move camp. Encamp near Bailey's 
Cross Roads. 

Tuesday, May 23d. — The Grand Review. March at four 
a. m. Crossing Long Bridge to Washington at sunrise, and 
march in review, with a front of forty men, rank and file num- 
bering eighty. Return to camp at sunset ; having marched 
twenty-four miles. 

Tuesday, May 30th. — Final Review of the 2d Corps by 
General Meade, which was witnessed by the President, Governor 
Fentox, and other distinguished officers. More than a thousand 
distinguished citizens, ladies and gentlemen were present. 

Friday, June 2d. — Orders received for the Regiment to be 
mustered out of service, and sent to the State rendezvous. 

Saturday, June 3d. — Regiment mustered out. 

Sunday, June 4th. — Regiment took freight cars at Washington 
for Elmira, N. Y 

Tuesday, June 6th. — Regiment arrived at Elmira last night, 
and at daylight left the cars and marched into town, meeting 
their former Colonel James M. Bull. Barracks are assigned 
them, where they await final payment. 

Friday and Saturday, June 16th and 11th. — The Regiment, 
221 strong, receive final payment and discharge. 



SUMMARY STATEMENT 



STRENGTH OF THE REGIMENT AND OF ITS LOSSES AT DIF- 
FERENT PERIODS DURING ITS TERM OF SERVICE. 



The Regiment was mustered into the service with thirty-nine 
officers and nine hundred and fifty-six enlisted men. Total, nine 
hundred and ninety-five. And was mustered out with only two 
hundred and twenty-one men. 

At the battle of Harper's Ferry its loss, in killed, was one 
officer and fifteen enlisted men; in wounded, four officers and 
thirty-five enlisted men. Total, fifty-five. 

On the 30th of June, 1863, it numbered thirty-nine officers and 
six hundred and sixty enlisted men, present and absent. 

On the 2d of July, 1863, it went into the battle of Gettysburg 
with two field officers, one Adjutant, three Surgeons, one Chap- 
lain, and twenty-seven line officers and four hundred and seventy- 
seven enlisted men, bearing arms, present for duty. 

At the battle of Gettysburg its loss, in killed, was six officers and 
fifty-five enlisted men ; in wounded, seven officers and one hundred 
and sixty-one enlisted men. Total, two hundred and twenty-nine. 

On the 30th of September, 1863, there were present for duty 
two field officers, eleven line officers and two hundred and forty- 
two enlisted men, with arms. This number is about the same as 
it was on the 14th of October following, when the battles of 
Auburn Ford and Bristow Station occurred. 

At Auburn Ford the Regiment lost five enlisted men killed, 
and seventeen wounded. At Bristow Station it lost six killed 
and thirteen wounded. Total on that day, forty-one. 

On the 31st of January, 1864, there were present for duty 
three field officers, eight line officers, and two hundred and thirty- 
two enlisted men. 

In the action at Morton's Ford, February 6th, 1864, there were 



328 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

three enlisted men killed and nineteen wounded. Total, twenty- 
two. 

On the 4th of April, 1864, two line officers and one hundred 
enlisted men were detailed as provost guard at head-quarters 2d 
Army Corps, and remained on such duty till the muster-out of 
the Regiment. 

On the 6th of June, 1864, Colonel Baied made a report to General 
Hancock, then commanding the Corps, from which the following 
is an extract : " At the opening of the campaign from the Rapi- 
dan to Petersburg, the strength of the Regiment present and 
absent was twenty-six commissioned officers and four hundred 
and ninety-six enlisted men ; of whom eight officers were on 
detached service, two absent sick, and one absent with leave, 
and one hundred and sixty-three enlisted men on detached ser- 
vice, one hundred and eleven absent sick (principally from 
wounds), three in arrest, making a total of two hundred and 
seventy-seven absent. The number present for duty was fifteen 
commissioned officers and one hundred and eighty-eight enlisted 
men, including twelve musicians. 

" During the present campaign, of those present for duty, there 
have been killed, wounded or missing, eight commissioned officers 
and one hundred and twenty- one enlisted men, but during the 
campaign both officers and men have joined the Regiment, so 
that at the present time the number present for duty is one Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel, one Adjutant, one Acting Quartermaster, three 
Captains, three Lieutenants, and sixty-nine enlisted men." 

After this came the fearful losses before Petersburg. The 
Regiment lost, in killed or mortally wounded, during the first 
week before Petersburg, from the 15th to the 22d of June, its 
Lieutenant-Colonel, Adjutant, one Captain and two Lieutenants ; 
and, in wounded, one Captain and one Lieutenant ; leaving, on 
the 22d of June, no field officer in command, and only one of the 
line officers, which were reported present for duty on the 6th of 
the month. Its losses in enlisted men were also severe. 

During its term of service the Regiment lost sixteen commis- 
sioned officers, killed in action or died of wounds received in 
battle. A loss of officers in action greater, in proportion to its 
number of officers, than that suffered by any other Regiment 
from this State, and excelled by but few in the service. 



Summart Statement. 329 

Of the officers who returned with the Regiment, Surgeon Ham- 
mond, Chaplain Hakrison, and Captain T. E. Munson, alone 
remained of the thirty-nine original officers who were mustered 
into the service two years, nine months and twelve days before. 

The following are the only Regiments that lost more officers, 
killed in action, during the war, than the 126th New York Vol- 
unteers : 

1st Maine Artillery Volunteers. Served first as infantry; then 
was recruited to twelve Companies as artillery. Lost twenty-one 
officers. 

31st Maine Infantry Volunteers. Served from March 1st, 1864, 
to July 15th, 1865. Lost seventeen officers. 

5th New Hampshire Volunteers. Served from October 2 2d, 
1861, to June 28th, 1865. Lost eighteen officers. 

20th Massachusetts Volunteers. Served from August 29th, 
1861, to July 16th, 1865. Lost seventeen officers. 

14th Connecticut Volunteers. Served from August 23d, 1862, 
to May 21st, 1865. Lost seventeen officers. 

8th New York Artillery (first called the 129th New York 
Infantry). Served from August, 1862, to June 5th, 1865. Lost 
nineteen officers. 

48th New York Volunteers. Served from September 10th, 
1861, to September 1st, 1865. Lost seventeen officers. 

61st Pennsylvania Volunteers. Served from September 7th, 
1861, to June 28th, 1865. Lost seventeen officers. 

62d Pennsylvania Volunteers. Served from August 31st, 1861, 
to July 13th, 1864. Lost seventeen officers. 

63d Pennsylvania Volunteers. Served from August 1st, 1861, 
to September 9th, 1864. Lost eighteen officers. 

145th Pennsylvania Volunteers. Served from September, 1862, 
to May 31st, 1865. Lost eighteen officers. 

Of these Regiments, however, the following were re enlisted as 
veterans, and recruited up with officers and men : 5th New York 
Volunteers; 20th Massachusetts Volunteers; 48th New York 
Volunteers; 61st Pennsylvania Volunteers; 62d Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, and 63d Pennsylvania Volunteers. The 14th Con- 
necticut Volunteers received large additions in recruits and con- 
scripts, and had a corresponding addition to its officers. 



THAMES AXD DATES OF BATTLES 

In which the Regiment was Engaged. 



Harper's Ferry, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862. 

Gettysburg, July 2d, 3d and 4th, 1863. 

Auburn Ford, October 14th, 1863, in the morning. 

Bristow Station, October 14th, 1863, in the afternoon. 

Mine Run, November 27th, 28th, 29th and 30th, 1863. 

Morton's Ford, February 6th, 1864. 

Wilderness, May 6th and 7th, 1864. 

Po River, May 10th, 1864. 

Spottsylvania, May 12th to 18th, 1864. 

North Anna, May 23d to 27th, 1864. 

Tolopotomy, May 29th to 31st, 1864. 

Cold Harbor, June 1st to 12th, 1864. 

Front of Petersburg, June 16th, 17th and 18th, 1864. 

At left of Petersburg, June 22d, 1864. 

Deep Bottom, July 26th, 1864. 

Strawberry Plains, August 14th to 20th, 1864. 

Reams' Station, August 25th, 1864. 

Assaidt on the lines around Petersburg, March 25th, 1865. 

Boydton Plank Road, March 29th to 31st, 1S65. 

Sutherland's Station, April 2d, 1865. 

Farmville, April 7th, 1865. 

Appomattox, April 9th, 1865. 



HISTORY OF THE COLORS 



ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SIXTH REGIMENT NEW YORK 
STATE VOLUNTEERS. 



The Colors received by the Regiment, on its organization, at 
Geneva, in August, 1862, were presented by some of the patriotic 
ladies of the twenty-sixth senatorial district. The occasion was 
a pleasant one, with appropriate speeches on the presentation and 
acceptance of the flag, which, of course, was to be brought back 
after the rebellion should be crushed, and returned to the ladies 
who gave it ; its folds inscribed all over with the names of hard 
fought fields, where victories had been won in the cause of our 
glorious Union. Luckless flag ! It was carried to Harper's 
Ferry, and, with nearly a score of others, went as a trophy of 
war to Stonewall Jackson. 

The next Colors were received from the Government, upon the 
return of the Regiment to Virginia, after its exchange ; and in 
the first battle in which they were borne (Gettysburg) they 
received seven musket shots, and were twice torn by shells. 

In that dreadful charge of the 3d Brigade, on the 2d of July, 
1863, the flag Avas carried by Sergeant Erasmus E. Bassett, of 
Company B, and, almost in the moment of victory, it was seen 
to falter, for its bearer was shot in the leg; but it did not fall. 
Rallying his guard, and cheering those around him, the yoUng 
soldier pressed on regardless of his wound; but another shot 
from a rebel, not five paces distant, pierced his heart, and he fell 
dead, without a struggle or a groan. Not unavenged, however, 
for a shot from one of the Color-guard laid that rebel dead by 
the side of his victim. 

Serjeant Bassett was as good as he was brave. Amiable in 
temper, and ever attentive to his duties, he possessed the esteem 
of his comrades and superiors, and died beloved by all. 



834 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

Upon the fall of Bassett, Sergeant Ambrose Bedell, of Com- 
pany E, seized the Colors, and bore them through that engage- 
ment, notwithstanding a wound in the hand, and carried them 
the next day, when the enemy charged our lines on Cemetery 
Hill; but another shot tore his hand and arm so that the Colors 
fell from his grasp. They were seized, before they touched the 
ground, by an officer, and delivered to Corporal Henry Mattoon, 
Company D, who cai'ried them for a few minutes, when he, too 
fell, shot through the neck and shoulder ; and private Theodore 
P. Vickery caught them and bore them up for an instant, when he 
too was shot, and fell, severely wounded. Yet, through the smoke 
and blaze of battle, the Regiment could say : Our flag is still 
there ! For private Lewis Clark, Company K, a modest, deli- 
cate youth, with a slender frame, but a big heart, snatched the 
Colors, as they were falling, and bore them aloft in advance of 
the line. For this gallant act he received the commendation of 
General Hays, who witnessed it, and was promoted to a Ser- 
geantcy. 

After the battle of Gettysburg, Sergeant Milo H. Hopper, 
Company D, took the Colors and carried them through the bat- 
tles of Auburn, Bristow, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, and in the 
campaigns of 1864, from the Rapidan to Petersburg, till the 9th 
of June, at Cold Harbor, when he was appointed Sergeant-Major, 
and Sergeant James Harper, Company G, took the Colors and 
carried them till the 22d of June, 1864. On that day the 2d 
Corps was advanced, leaving a gap between its left and the right 
of the 6th Corps, and Barlow's Division, being on the left of the 
2d Corps, was moved forward into a partially wooded country 
beyond any position previously held by our forces, without flank- 
ers or any other protection to its left ; when the enemy, evidently 
understanding our movements, advanced a large force around 
Barlow's left, and closed up on him from front, flank and rear, 
and Barlow himself barely escaped capture, while the larger 
portion of several of his Regiments were surrounded by the 
enemy and made prisoners. But the 3d Brigade (to which the 
126th belonged), under MacDougal, fought its way out of the 
pocket, retreating as they fought, but with great loss, for the 
fighting was at such close quarters that no sooner was a man shot 
down than the enemy was upon him. Captain Morris Brown, 



History of the Colors. 335 

Jr., commanding the Regiment, was instantly killed, and James 
Harper, the Color-bearer, was shot and fell into the hands of the 
enemy; but Theodore P. Vickeky, who was wounded at Get- 
tysburg, while carrying the Colors, was at hand in this time of 
need to bear again that battle torn flag, but a fatal bullet pierced 
his body, and he fell, lifeless. Milo H. Hopper, who had sacredly 
guarded the Colors through the terrible battle scenes of nearly a 
year unscathed, and who had so recently resigned his trust to 
James Harper, was also stricken down by a bullet through the 
right thigh. 

Although the orders were strict and strictly enforced, that no 
Regiment which had lost its Colors through any fault, should be 
furnished with new ones, yet a new stand of Government Colors 
was immediately presented to this Regiment, which had now 
become reduced to sixty-seven, officers and enlisted men, ])resent 
for duty. 

Those Colors were carried until the close of the war, by Ser- 
geant Covert Barnum, Company C, and were then returned to 
the Government, by whose order they were afterward delivered 
to the Governor of the State of New York, and are now deposited 
in the Bureau of Military Statistics, at Albany. The following 
battles were inscribed on these Colors, pursuant to General 
Orders, from the War Department : Gettysburg, Bristow Station, 
Mine Run, Wilderness, Po river, Spottsylvania, North Anna, 
Tolopotomy, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Strawberry Plains, Deep 
bottom, Ream's Station. 

The Regiment was mustered out of the service before the 
eiders for the inscription of the subsequent battles were issued. 





6b-7^, 



y 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



Brevet Major-General Alexander Hays 

(Brigadier-General of Volunteers) 

Was the son of General Samuel Hats, of Venango county, Penn- 
sylvania, and was born in the year 1820. He graduated at the 
military academy of West Point, in 1844, having as classmates, 
Hancock, Pleasanton, and other distinguished officers, and was 
promoted to the 4th United States Infantry, as a Brevet Second 
Lieutenant. He was soon afterward married to Miss Annie A., 
second daughter of Mr. John B. McFadden, one of the most 
respected citizens of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. He served on 
frontier duty and in the military occupation of Texas in 1845 and 
1846 ; was in the war with Mexico, being engaged in the battles 
of Palo Alto, May 8th, 1846, and Resaca de la Palma, May 9th, 
1846; and for gallant conduct in these battles he was breveted 
First Lieutenant, May 9th, 1846, and was, promoted Second 
Lieutenant 8th Infantry, June 18th, 1846. 

Subsequently, he was sent to western Pennsylvania on recruit- 
ing service, and having, in a short time, enlisted a large number 
of men, he proceeded with them to Vera Cruz, and marched 
thence to the relief of our garrison at Puebla. 

Soon after arriving the second time in Mexico he was appointed 
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General to Brigadier-General Lane, 
and he distinguished himself in several conflicts with the enemy, 
and inflicted severe punishment on the guerrillas that infested 
that part of the country. It Mas once remarked by a distin- 
guished officer of the army, that while on General Lane's staff, 
Lieutenant Hays made a military reputation for his chief which 
afterward sent him to the United States Senate from Oregon. 

He resigned his commission in the army on the 12th of April, 
1848, and, after a short experience in the business of manufactur- 
ing iron, lie turned his attention to civil engineering until the 
lneakiug out of the rebellion, when lie went out with the old li'th 



338 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

Pennsylvania three months Volunteers, on the 25th of April, 
1361, but afterward entered the volunteer service as Colonel of 
the 63d Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was appointed Captain in 
the 16th United States Infantry, May 14th, 1861. 

During the Peninsular campaign he was attached, with his 
Regiment, to the 1st Brigade, 3d (Kearney's) Division, 3d Army 
Corps, under General Heixtzelman. He participated with gal- 
lantry in the battles of Seven Pines and Fair Oaks, and was 
appointed Brevet Major United States Army, June 30th, 1862, 
for gallant and meritorious services at the battles of Fair Oaks, 
Peach Orchard, and Glendale, Virginia. He also distinguished 
himself during the seven days fight, and was appointed Brevet 
Lieutenant-Colonel United States Army June 30th, 1862, for gal- 
lant conduct in the battles of Glendale and Malvern Hill. He led 
his command in the battles of Groveton (called also second Bull 
Run), where he was severely wounded on the 30th of August, 
1862. He was appointed Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Sep- 
tember 29th, 1862. Having partially recovered from his wounds, 
and reported to the Adjutant-General for duty January 6th, 1863, 
he was ordered to the command of the 3d Brigade of Casey's 
Division, in the defenses of Washington, under General Heixt- 
zeljiax, and on the 9th of January, 1863, he assumed com- 
mand of the Brigade, consisting of the 39th, 111th, 125th and 
126th Xew York Volunteers, the 151st Pennsylvania Volunteers, 
and the Pennsylvania Keystone Battery, then doing picket duty 
along Bull Run. He remained in command of this Brigade till 
the 25th of June, 1863, when the Xew York Regiments of the 
Brigade were transferred to the 3d Division of the 2d Army 
Corps, under General Haxcock, and General Hats, was assigned 
to the command of that Division, and remained in command of 
the Division through the battles of Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, 
Bristow Station, Mine Run and Morton's Ford, and until the 26th 
of March, 186t, when, upon the consolidation of the Army of the 
Potomac, the Brigades of the old 3d Division of the 2d Army Corps 
were assigned to the 1st and 2d Divisions of the Corps, and General 
Hats was placed in command of the 2d Brigade of Birxet's 
Division, previously of the 3d Corps, but in the consolidation, 
the 3d Division of the 2d Corps, a command which in name was 
inferior, but in numbers greater than that of the old 3d Division. 



Biographical Sketches. 339 

Ho was breveted Colonel United States Army, July 2d, 1863, 
for gallant and meritorious services at the battle of Gettysburg. 

General Hays led his command in the battle of the Wilderness, 
on the 5th of May, 1864, and while rallying his Brigade to with- 
stand the shock of Lee's legions that came cheering down with 
superior numbers upon him, he was pierced by a rebel bullet, and 
fell with his face to the foe. The lowering clouds of battle threw 
a dark pall over the scene, and 200,000 muskets flashed their 
lurid fires in deadly defiance, and shook the deep forest with their 
angry roar, honors befitting the death of the noblest chieftain. So 
died Hats, the hero. 

The announcement of his death was a sad one to the old 3d 
Brigade, and especially to the 126th New York, to whom he was 
more than a friend in the day of their adversity, when perjured 
cowards had blackened their record ; for he became their patron, 
believed in their innocence and virtue, and trusted in their 
bravery, a trust never betrayed. 

Well do the survivors of the 126th New York remember the 
earnest words of General Hays, when at Auburn he spurred his 
horse down the line to that Regiment, and ordered it to drive the 
enemy out of the woods in front, saying, as he gave the order, 
that he wanted a Regiment that would not not, and although, in 
obeying the order, the Regiment lost one-tenth of its number, it 
felt proud of the confidence reposed in it by the General it loved 
to honor. 

His body was taken from the bloody field of the Wilderness to 
loyal Pittsburg where the whole city mourned his loss. The 
Mayor and Councils attended the funeral in a body, and a 
military escort followed by many thousand citizens performed the 
last sad honors to the earthly remains of General Alexander 
Hays ; but his memory is cherished not only by his bereaved 
family, but by the tens of thousands of citizens who knew him 
personally, or through their gallant soldier sons, had learned to 
love him for his noble qualities as a man, and his bravery, effici- 
ency, and skill as an officer. 

He always seemed to win the confidence and admiration of the 
men of his command. It is said that while a Colonel under 
Kkaknev, he led his Bcgiment with such gallantry and success 
in a charge that the "Knightly Kearney v embraced Hays upon 



340 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

the field, glorified the grand charge which he had made, and 
ordered surrounding Regiments to do honor to his men as they 
marched by almost " dancing in air " with elation. 

He well knew how to take advantage of the occasion to 
develop the martial spirit of his command. At Gettysburg, when 
Longstreet's memorable charge of the 3d of July had been 
repelled and the twelve Regiments of Hats' Division had cap- 
tured 2,600 prisoners and twenty-one stands of colors, General 
Hays took a rebel flag captured by a Captain of the 126th New 
York Volunteers, on which was inscribed " Harper's Ferry " and 
the names of ten other battles, and two of his staff,* each 
with a captured flag rode down in front of his command and up 
in rear, trailing the rebel colors in the dust amid the deafening 
shouts and cheers of the men, who for the moment forgot the 
terrible battle scenes and thought only of the glory of their 
victory. 

The United States Service Magazine, of September, 1864, says, 
of General Hays, at the battle of Gettysburg, on the memorable 
3d of July : " General Hays, commanding the 3d Division of the 
2d Army Corps, finds himself opposed to General A. P Hill, in 
which is General George E. Pickett, and others of his old 
classmates and comrades of the Mexican war, on the road leading 
to Emmettsburg. Hill has been cannonading them for some 
time, without effect ; then moves his troops across the field, 
thinking, no doubt, that his veterans will drive these rair militia 
like chaff before the storm. But they meet General Hays and 
his veterans ; he has put fight into them. Behind the shelter of 
a stone fence he restrains himself and his men until the enemy is 
at close quarters. Then, like Wellington, at Waterloo, the 
word is: 'Up, and at them!' His rapid, well directed volleys 
send the head of Hill's column reeling in confusion back upon 
its center and rear. A hurricane, charged with lead and fire and 
death, consumes them. The battle was won. This was the 
decisive charge ; and General Hays was a hero among heroes at 
Gettysburg. 

"• He takes from the enemy, that day, twenty banners and bat- 

* Captain George P. Corts, Assistant Adjutant-General, and Lieutenant David Shields, 
Aide-de-Camp. Lieutenant Shields was shot through one of his lungs at Morton's Ford, 
February 6th, 1864, but still survives, though seriously disabled by the almost fatal wound. 



Biographical Sketches. 341 

tie flags, three thousand, stands of arms, and kills and captures 
about twice the number of his command. Out of twenty- 
mounted orderlies, he has but six left. He has lost all his 
Colonels ! Lieutenant-Colonels command Brigades ! Lieuten- 
ants command Regiments ! Two of his five horses are killed 
under him. His whole staff is unhorsed. Their steeds lie dead 
where they fell, or are in their last agonies. Gathering around 
their chief to congratulate him, reeking with the dust and sweat 
and fumes, and weary with the toil of the battle, they receive the 
commendation they deserve. How proud they are of their chief ! 
How proud he is of his ' boys ! ' The battle cloud has passed 
away from his brow, and the hard-set features of a few moments 
before relax into his kind, familiar smile of love and affection. 
George P. Corts, Captain, and Assistant Adjutant-General, 
reliable and efficient, often under fire with him before, wants to 
follow up the success while the game is in view and the trail is 
fresh. The General takes young Dave Shields, his boy Lieuten- 
ant and Aid-de-Camp, not yet twenty years old (and he can 
count nearly as many battles), in his arms and imprints a kiss 
on his cheek, while his boyish face is yet aglow with the flush, 
and his bright eye sparkling with the fire of victory. What 
youth in the land would not be prouder of that kiss of honor 
from his General than of a hundred from the lips of the fairest 
maidens." 

At "Washington, on the 1st of January, 1864, while returning 
to the front from a short leave to his home in Pittsburg, Pa., he 
received a beautiful sword, sent to him with an appropriate note 
of presentation, dated December 30th, 1N63, by his friends and 
fellow-citizens of the city of his adoption, as a testimonial of 
their appreciation of his worth and services. The hilt was of 
'-olid silver, cast in the form of two zouave soldiers, with muskets 
at a shoulder. This was surmounted by an .American eagle in 
solid gold, the guard of the hilt being also gold. The scabbard 
was ol gold, and beautifully embossed with wreaths and crests, 
and terminated in a broad, blunt end like that of a Roman 
Mvonl. It bore the following inscription : " Presented to Gene- 
ral Ar,EXANi>Kn Hays by the citizens of Pittsburg, 186-V 
Ibneath which was ".Mexico, 1846-47; Yorktown, Williams- 
burg, Fair Oaks, The Orchard, Nelson's Farm, Malvern Hill, 



342 126th Regiment Xew York Volunteers. 

Bristow, Groveton, Gettysburg, Auburn, Bristow, and Locust 
Grove." The accompanying belt was of a magnificence to cor- 
respond with the sword. 

The following extract from the letter of acknowledgment of 
the gift is truly characteristic : 

Washington, D. C, January 1, 1864. 

Gentlemen. — I have this morning received your magnificent sword ; it is 
impossible to express my sense of the high honor which you have conferred 
upon me. The exquisite richness of the testimonial enhances its interest to 
others, but the motives of the donors endear its value to me. 

When the rebellion broke upon us like a tornado, in the desecration of our 
flag at Sumter, I took an oath never to sheath a sword until honorable 
peace should restore to us our glorious Union. 

I am no politician of any political clique or party, but will support the 
existing government with my whole soul, heart, and body. It gives me 
great satisfaction that by transferring the war to the soil of the rebels, our 
own loved homes have been spared the desolation which I have witnessed. 
Increased prosperity has been ours, and western Pennsylvania may well be 
proud of the reputation her soldiers have earned. ****** * 

I return to you, gentlemen, my sincere thanks for your warm expressions 
of approbation, and assure my friends that if my past conduct meets with 
their approval, no act of mine hereafter shall forfeit it. 

In acknowledgment of the distinguished honor you have conferred upon 
me, I must request a recognition of those who have most contributed to my 
success. The blood of the sons of " our dear old commonwealth," has flown 
freely, but it is mingled with that of Ohio, New York, New Jersey, Connec- 
ticut, Indiana, Virginia, Rhode Island, and Delaware. God bless the 
defenders of our dear old flag. 

Yours sincerely, 

ALEXANDER HAYS, 

Brigadier- General Volunteers. 

Aside from his qualifications as a brave and gallant officer, 
General Hats was a man of decided scientific culture, scholarly 
taste, and a refined and accomplished gentleman, possessed of an 
unfailing fund of humor and an exuberance of spirits and visjor. 



Biographical Sketches. 343 

Coloxel Eliakim Sheeeill 

Was born in Greenville, Greene county, N". Y., February 16th, 
1813. His father being a tanner and also a farmer, his son was 
reared to both pursuits. He received a good English education 
at the academy in his native town, and, in 1832, removed to 
Herkimer county, where he married a daughter of Judge Eld- 
ridge, of Madison county. In 1838, he removed to Shandaken, 
in Ulster county, and was engaged in an extensive tannery, of 
which he ultimately became part owner and chief manager. In 
1847 he was elected member of Congress from the Ulster district, 
and in 1854 he was elected State senator, and served two years, 
being chairman of the committee on banks and banking. In 1857 
he removed to Brooklyn, and thence, in 1860, to Geneva, where his 
previous prosperity in business enabled him to secure a fine farm, 
which he was cultivating with skill and success, when, in 1862, 
the call for "Three Hundred Thousand Men" roused him, with 
other patriots, to serve his country in the field. The Governor, 
upon the recommendation of the twenty-sixth senatorial district 
committee, having selected him to raise the Regiment assigned to 
the district, he immediately responded to the call, and, saying to 
his family, " My country needs me, it is my duty to go," he gave 
his whole energy to the work of recruiting the Regiment ; and 
within a shorter period than the most sanguine anticipated, he 
was on his way to the field with a full Regiment of men. On 
arriving at Baltimore he was ordered to Harper's Ferry with his 
Regiment, for post duty and instruction, under Colonel Miles, an 
old army officer; but, soon after getting his Regiment into camp, the 
defeat of Pope's army and the advance of the enemy indicated 
that the camp at Harper's Ferry would not long remain a peaceful 
school of instruction. 

Colonel Siieuiiill then made every possible effort to have his 
command receive such military instruction as would enable it to be 
used in an emergency The men were kept under drill as much 
as was consistent with their health; and loading, firms', and target 
firing was practiced by the details for camp guard, so that the 
greatest possible efficiency could be obtained within the few days 
of peace that might be spared them. 

The drill and discipline to which Colonel Siierrill subjected his 



344 126th Regime xt Xew York Volunteers. 

command, doubtless attracted the attention of the commanding- 
officer, who detailed the Regiment to meet the enemy on Maryland 
Heights ; and thus he was unwittingly drawn into action by reason 
of his diligence in preparing for it. 

When his Regiment was thus detailed for service, Colonel Sher- 
rill, in justice to his command, informed his superior officer of their 
inexperience and scanty instruction ; but, as a soldier and a man 
of honor, he Avas ready to obey the orders of his commanding 
officer, and with less than seven hundred of his own Regiment (the 
rest, excepting the sick, being on picket or other duty), and small 
detachments of other Regiments, he kept a Brigade of the enemy 
(Kershaw's) at bay, on Maryland Heights, for hours, where, with 
fearless exposure, in the front ranks, in order to see intelligently the 
movements of the enemy, he fell, severely wounded; a musket 
shot, through his lower jaw, tearing out his teeth, catting his 
tongue, and driving a piece of a tooth into the back part of the 
tongue, from which it was taken out, weeks afterward, through 
an incision from the outside and beneath. This wound never 
healed. But as soon as he had sufficiently recovered to enable 
him to travel, he started for the field, and reached the Regiment 
at Union Mills, Va., December 10th, 1862; not to remain, for 
this, his health and the condition of his wound would not permit, 
but to look again upon his loved Regiment, whose reputation had 
been blackened by the blighting breath of slander, and on whose 
fame the poisoned fangs of perjured villains had fastened to hide 
the stains of their own cowardly acts. 

The Regiment turned out, under arms, and received its Colonel 
with the appropriate military salute ; and then greeted him with 
the warmer welcome of cheers that burst spontaneously from the 
breast. Colonel Sherrill left camp on the third day after his arri- 
val ; and, after having recruited his strength, and partially recovered 
from his wounds, returned again, on the 27th of January, 1863, 
and reported for duty, and resumed command of the Regiment. 
Under his command the Regiment became distinguished for its 
efficiency, discipline, and precision in drill. By his moral example, 
and his dignified, equable, and courteous intercourse with his 
officers, and treatment of his command, he brought out the nobler 
qualities of the men, and so developed their moral courage, pride 
of character, and power of self-command, that the Regiment was 



Biographical Sketches. 345 



distinguished, during its whole service, for its reliability on all 
occasions, especially under critical and trying circumstances. 

At the battle of Gettysburg, Colonel Sherrill led his Regiment 
down into that valley of death, whence the Excelsior Brigade, of 
the 3d Corps, had been driven on the evening of the 2d of 
July, and in a hand to hand fight with the enemy, drove him 
from the position, and helped to stay the tide that was sweeping 
back the 3d Corps. Colonel Willard, 125th New York Volun- 
teers, having been killed in this charge, Colonel Sherrill 
took command of the Brigade ; but, in the memorable charge of 
the following day, when 15,000 rebels assaulted the lines of the 
2d Corps, Colonel Sherrill, while in command of his Brigade and 
standing in the rear of the 39th, New York Volunteers, fell, mortally 
wounded by a musket shot in the bowels, just when the battle 
was the hottest ; but his men, still supposing themselves under 
his command, fought on until the rebel host melted away under 
their unerring fire, or fled in confusion back across the valley 
through which they had just charged in awful grandeur. 

Without the knowledge of the men of his own Regiment, the 
dying Sherrill was borne to the rear by some men of the 39th 
Xew York Volunteers, and taken to the 11th Corps Hospital, 
where he breathed his last, at about eight o'clock in the morning 
of the 4th of July, 1863. It seemed most fit that if the sacrifice 
of such a patriot's life must be made, it should be consummated 
on our country's birthday. His remains were taken to his home, 
in Geneva, and buried with military honors. Ten thousand per- 
sons attended his funeral, for all the friends of his Regiment were 
mourners. 

While with his officers he often spoke of the happy re-unions 
of his Regiment he hoped to enjoy after the close of the war. 
His faith in the success of our arms was unbounded, and Ids love 
for his Regiment was like that of a father for his children. 

The two battles in which he was engaged, Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg, constitute two of the most memorable epochs in 
the history of his Regiment. 



346 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

Colonel James M. Bull 

Was born in Canandaigua, N Y., in 1825. He studied the pro- 
fession of law in the office of Messrs. Woeden & Chesbeo, 
Esquires, and was admitted to the bar, and afterward entered 
the law office of Messrs. Smith & Lapham, and subsequently 
became a partner in the office. 

At the breaking; out of the war he took an active part in 
assisting to recruit the several Companies organized in the 
county. He devoted much time to the duties of the War Com- 
mittee, of which he was a member, and was, at length, appointed 
Lieutenant-Colonel of the 126th New York Volunteers, which 
Regiment he had been actively engaged in recruiting. 

He was commissioned and mustered Lieutenant-Colonel to 
rank from August 15, 1862, and was absent on leave, to close up 
his business, until about the 15th of September, when, communi- 
cation with his Regiment, at Harper's Ferry, having been cut off 
by the enemy's advance into Mai-yland, he reported to the 
Adjutant-General, at Washington, and was ordered to report to 
Major-General Wool, at Baltimore, under whose orders he con- 
tinued on special duty till the 22d of Sej^tember, 1862, when his 
Regiment, having been paroled, arrived at Annapolis, he joined 
it there, and assumed command, and remained in command until 
the return of Colonel Sheeeill to duty on the 2 '7th of January, 
1863. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Bull again took command of the Regiment 
on the evening of July 2d, 1863, at the battle of Gettysburg, 
when, Colonel Willabd having been killed by a shell, Colonel 
Sheeeill took command of the Brigade. 

Colonel Sheeeill having been mortally wounded on the after- 
noon of July 3d, and Colonel McDougal, 111th New York Volun- 
teers, having been wounded soon thereafter, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Bull, then being the senior officer, took command of the Brigade 
by order of General Alex. Hays, commanding the Division, and 
remained in command of it till July 26th, 1863, when, on being- 
relieved by a superior officer, he again assumed command of the 
Regiment, and continued in command until December 10th, 
1863. 

On the 30th of July, 1863, he was commissioned Colonel, with 



Biographical Sketches. 347 

rank from July 3d, 1863, and was mustered as Colonel, October 
25th, 1863. 

On the 10th of Decemher he received leave of absence on 
account of sickness, and remained absent until February 1st, 
1864, when he joined his Regiment for duty, and remained in 
command till February 10th, when he was ordered to the State 
of New York on recruiting service, from which he again joined 
the Regiment on the 8th of April, 1864, and was honorably dis- 
charged the service, for physical disability, April 18th, 1864, by 
Special Order iSTo. 107, Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, on tender 
of resignation. 

The following testimonials, exjjressive of the regard of the 
officers of his Regiment, and of General Owen, his former 
Brigade commander, were presented to Colonel Bull when he 
left the service, copies of the same being published in the local 
papers by direction of the officers : 

Head-quarters 2d Brigade, 2d Division, 2d Corps, \ 
April 29th, 1864. f 

Colonel James M. Bull, commanding the 126th New York Volunteers, 
attached to my Brigade, by his uniform prompt obedience to orders, and 
intelligent administration of regimental affairs, possessed my entire confi- 
dence and respect. He distinguished himself, and his command won for 
itself a name imperishable at the battle of Auburn, October 14th, 1863, 
where I detailed his Regiment to act as skirmishers to clear the road for the 
advance of my column in the direction of Catlett's Station. A Regiment 
of cavalry and a section of artillery attacked the head of the column. 
Colonel Bull displayed much personal bravery in the management of his 
troops, and in finally dislodging the enemy from his position. 

I regret very much the necessity of Colonel Bull's retiring from the ser- 
vice, and hope Ids improvement in health will soon enable him to join bis 

companions in arms. 

JOSHUA T. OVVEX, 

Briijetdier-Uenend Volunteer*. 



Head-quarters, 12(>tii Nkw York Volunteers,) 
Camp near Stkyknshi'ko, \'a., A/iril 23d, 1804. \ 

To Jamks M. Bull, lute Colon el \2<itli Sew York Volunteers: 

Dear Sin. — The undersigned, commissioned officers of the 126th New 
York Volunteers, having heard of the acceptance of your resignation as 
commanding officer of the Regiment, take the occasion, before your depart- 
ure from among us, to bear cheerful testimony to your worth as an officer 



348 126th Regiment Xew York Volunteers. 

and man. We have served under you for most of the time since the organi- 
zation of the Regiment, and, as Lieutenant-Colonel and Colonel, in camp, 
on the march, and in the field, you have discharged your duties fearlessly, 
and with fidelity to all under your command. 

We regret that declining health has compelled you to resign ; and, as you 
go from among us, you carry our best wishes for your future welfare and 
happiness. 

In taking leave of you, we express the hope that the new field upon 
which you are about to enter may prove the path to promotion and con- 
tinued distinction. 

Very truly your friends. 

The last testimonial "was signed by all the officers of the Regi- 
ment then present. 

Colonel Bull was in the following battles : Gettysburg, Auburn 
Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, and Morton's Ford. 

In 1865, after the muster out of the Regiment, he procured a 
meeting of the officers of the Regiment to be held for the 
appointment of a committee to obtain redress, if possible, from 
the War Department for the false charges made against the 
Regiment, and in reference to its conduct at Maryland Heights, 
in 1862; and to procure the writing and publication of a history 
of the Regiment; and, in the spring and early summer of 1867, he 
took measures to carry out a cherished design of his, to have a 
social reunion of the members of his Regiment, on the anniversary 
of their muster into the service, August 22d, 1862. But he died 
at his home, in Canandaigua, on the 25th of July, 1867, without 
having the pleasure of seeing the members of his loved Regi- 
ment once more assembled. He had never recovered his health 
since his discharge from the army. Yet a fatal termination of 
the insidious diseases contracted in the service was wholly 
unlooked for by his relatives and friends. His loss was felt and 
mourned by all who knew him. 

Appropriate resolutions were passed by the bar of Ontario 
county, of which he was a member; and, at the regimental 
reunion, the soldiers whom he had invited to meet him, adopted 
the following resolutions : 

Whereas, James M. Bull, our late Colonel, at whose invitation, while 
living, we assemble here to-day, and other officers and soldiers of our Regi- 
ment have, through the dispensation of Providence, been removed from 
among us, by death, since our regimental discharge from the service of the 
United States ; therefore, 



Biographical Sketches. 349 

Rctolrtd, That, in the death of Colonel James M. Bull, we mourn the 
loss of a brave and gallant officer, and a warm and faithful friend, who had 
become endeared to us by his uniform kindness, patriotism and courage in 
the field, and by his genial and social qualities in civil life, and the lively 
interest which he took in the welfare of all who periled their lives for their 
country. 

Rewired, That we have learned, with deep sorrow of the death of some 
of our late comrades in arms who had survived the war; and, while we 
mourn their loss, we shall ever point with pride to their gallant conduct in 
many a hard fought battle, and remember, with feelings of gratitude, their 
devotion to their countiy, and their efforts to promote the common welfare 
of our Regiment ; and we shall cherish their memories in common with 
those of our comrades who fell in battle or died in the hospital. 

Resolved, That we tender our heartfelt sympathies to the families and 
friends of the deceased, and that copies of these resolutions, published with 
the proceedings of the meeting, be transmitted to them. 

Lieutenant-Colonel William H. Baird 

Was born in Auburn, New York, August 19th, 1831. His earlier 
life was one of adventure, but before the late war he married and 
settled in Geneva, New York, and engaged with his brother (D. 
W Baird) in the business of carriage-making. At the breaking 
out of the war, he was among the first to respond to the call of 
the President for volunteers. He recruited Company II, 38th 
New York Volunteers, was commissioned and mustered Captain 
of the Company, with rank from May 24th, 1861, the date of his 
Company's organization, and with his Company immediately 
joined his Regiment at New York. As a testimonial of their 
appreciation of Captain Baird, the citizens of Geneva publicly 
presented him with a beautiful sword, on his leaving for the front. 
He was promoted to be Major of Ins Regiment January 11th, 
1*02, and after the battle of Williamsburg, May 5th, 1802, Colo- 
nel Ward (afterward Brigadier-General) of his Regiment having 
taken temporary command of his Hrigade, and his Lieutenant- 
Colonel having been wounded, he took command of his Regiment, 
and led it in the battle of Fair Oaks, and acted in the capacity of 
Lieutenant-Colonel during the seven days 1 battles, and at Mal- 
vern Hill, and was discharged July 16th, 1862, on the application 
of Colonel Siiekuill, to accept the position of Major in the 120th 
Xew York Volunteers, then being recruited. While with the 
3sth Xew York Volunteers he participated in the following bat- 



350 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

ties : First Bull Run, Yorktown, Williamsburg, Hanover Court- 
house, Fair Oaks, the seven days' battles and Malvern Hill, and 
received the special commendation of his commanding officers for 
his efficient service as an officer, and gallant conduct in action. 

He joined the 126th New York Volunteers in camp, at Geneva, 
New York, on the 9th day of August, 1862, assisted in the orga- 
nization of the Regiment, was commissioned and mustered Major 
of the Regiment to date August 9th, 1862, and accompanied the 
Regiment to the field, where he was indefatigable in his efforts in 
drilling the Regiment. Colonel Sheeeill having been severely 
wounded in the engagement on Maryland Heights, and Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel Bull being absent on duty in the State of Maryland, 
Major Baied succeeded to the command of the Regiment, and 
after Maryland Heights had been ordered to be abandoned by 
Colonel Miles, Major Baied marched his Regiment to Bolivar 
Heights, and intrenched his position there, and when, in the 
morning of the day following, the storm of solid shot and 
exploding shells burst upon the troops from front and flank and 
rear, his admirable coolness and composure were an example for 
his command. 

After the surrender of Harper's Ferry and the transfer of the 
Regiment under parole to Chicago, Major Baied was appointed 
Provost Marshal of that Post, and remained on that duty while 
his Regiment was there, except for a few days while absent in 
response to a summons from "Washington to testify as a witness 
before the Military Commission, of which Major-General David 
Hunter was President, concerning the surrender by Colonel 
Miles, of Harper's Ferry. On the 27th of November, 1862, 
having arrived with his Regiment at Washington, on the way to 
the field, he was officially notified that by General Orders, No. 
183, dated November 8th, 1862, issued from the Adjutant General's 
Office, by direction of the Secretary of War, he was dismissed 
from the service for alleged " Bad Conduct," on Maryland Heights. 
Major Baied was not aware that he was on trial, either while 
testifying before the Military Commission or afterward, until he 
saw in the newspapers an account of the order dismissing him 
from the service for alleged " Bad conduct." His previous military 
record had been excellent, and his courage and efficiency as an 
officer had never before been questioned. 



Biographical Sketches. 351 

Smarting under the public disgrace which had been inflicted 
upon him by an inquisitorial tribunal that tried its unsuspecting 
victims in secret, he immediately bent all his energies to obtain a 
re-hearing of his case and to remove the stigma upon his character 
as a soldier. He went to the Judge Advocate-General's Office, 
inspected the evidence given against him, and had one interview 
with, and a rebuff from Secretary Stanton ; but still persisting, 
with testimonials of his previous good conduct, from Major-Gene- 
ral Sedgwick, and Brigadier- General Ward, and with a letter 
from Colonel Sherrill, and a report from Judge Holt of the 
character and bearing of the evidence given against him, he 
obtained a reconsideration of his case from Secretary Stantox, 
and the order of dismissal was revoked, and he was reinstated as 
an officer ; but the vacancy in the Regiment having been filled in 
the meantime he was unable to return to duty. 

Colonel Sherrell having been killed at the battle of Gettys- 
burg in July 1863, and Lieutenant-Colonel Bull commissioned 
Colonel, Major Baird was then commissioned Lieutenant-Colonel 
in the regiment, with rank from July 3d, 1863, but was unable to 
be mustered under the regulations restricting the number of field 
officers to two in a regiment, reduced as was the 126th New York 
Volunteers at that time. But the 2d Corps having distinguished 
itself at the battle of Bristow Station, October 14th, 1863, an 
order was issued from the War Department congratulating them 
on their victory, complimenting them for their gallantry, and per- 
mitting as a special favor all officers in the Corps, awaiting mus- 
ter, to muster according to the rank of their commissions, thus 
enabling Lieutenant-Colonel Baird to muster in and join his regi- 
ment for duty on the 3d of November, 1863. Colonel Baikd 
distinguished himself at Morton's Ford, February 6th, 1864, and 
was complimented by his superior officers for his bravery and 
gallant conduct with his command under fire. 

In April, 1864, he received leave of absence to accompany his 
wife, then seriously ill, to his home in Geneva, and rejoined his 
Regiment again on the 15th of May following, near Spottsylvania. 
Court-house, and continued in command of the Regiment until 
the 16th of June, 1864, when he was killed in action in front of 
Petersburg. About six o'clock, in the afternoon of that day, a 
charge was made by the 2d Corps, under Hancock, upon the 



352 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

rebel lines in front of Petersburg, the Regiments being formed 
in double column at half distance, and by order of Colonel Paul 
Frank, commanding the Brigade. Colonel Ceandall, 125th 
New York Volunteers, commanded the right wing of the Brigade, 
and Colonel McDottgal, 111th New York Volunteers, com- 
manded the left. The charge was made over a level field for 
about half a mile, then across a ravine with sloping sides of 
about fifty yards each, from the further bank of which si 
rebel line was driven, and the Brigade advanced under a mur- 
derous fire into a young orchard, when the Brigade was 
halted for want of support on its right and left, and wast 
formed along the bank of the ravine, under the fire from 
the enemy on both flanks. Colonel Ceandall, commanding 
the right wing of the Brigade having been disabled, Colonel 
Baied was ordered to take his place, and while establishing 
the line on the right, he was struck by a musket ball, from 
the right, entering his right side, passing through both lungs 
and coming out at the left. He lived about an hour, attended 
by his Adjutant, and died on the battle-field fully conscious 
and composed in mind to the last. He gave his last mes- 
sages for his family to his Adjutant, and calmly said in substance 
that he did not regret entering the service ; he had tried to do 
his duty and should die on duty in his place on the field of battle. 
His Adjutant (Spencee F. Lincoln), was also shot a few minutes 
after Colonel Baied expired, and subsequently died without the 
opportunity of personally conveying the last messages of Colonel 
Baied to his family. The announcement of Colonel Baied 1 * 
death cast a gloom over the Regiment, for the men of his com- 
mand had come to know him. He was strict while on duty, but 
was kind, genial, generous and vivacious, when relieved from the 
restraints and responsibilities of command. Possessed of an 
extraordinary memory and buoyancy of spirit, he enlivened many 
an otherwise tedious hour, with well-timed narratives or humor- 
ous anecdotes. One of his warm friends writes thus of Colonel 
Baied : " No danger, discomfort or fatigue could quench his 
ceaseless flow of pleasant feeling. His consideration and sym- 
pathy for his men and his genial nature, were characteristics that 
soon won the esteem and affection of the soldiers of his Regiment, 
and their sorrow for his untimely death, was testified in words of 



Biographical Sketches. §53 

heartfelt sympathy. They had lost a friend ; the Regiment its 
tried and beloved commander." 

While with the 126th New York Volunteers he was in the fol- 
lowing battles : Harper's Ferry, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, 
Spottsylvania, May 18th, North Anna, Tolopotomoy, Cold Har- 
bor and Petersburg.* 

The following are the testimonials furnished him by Generals 
Sedgwick and Ward, and Colonel Sherrill, to enable him to 
obtain a re-hearing in the Harper's Ferry case : 

[Letter op General Ward.] 
" Head-quarters 2d Brigade, 1st Division, j 
"3d Corps, Army op the Potomac. j 

To His Excellency the President of the United States : 

I have the honor to state that William H. Baird late Major of the 126th 
Regiment New York State Volunteers, dismissed the service of the United 
States dishonorably, has applied to me for a certificate relative to his actions 
as an officer under my command. 

Mr. Baird joined the 38th New York Volunteers, of which I was Colonel, 
as Captain, and was mustered into the United States service June 3d, 1861. 
He was in command of his Company at the battle of Bull Run, July, 1861, 
and discharged his duty as a brave man to my entire satisfaction. 

On the 11th of January, 1862, he was appointed Major of the Regiment, 
and acted in that capacity at the battle of Williamsburg, May 5th, 1862, 
where he again discharged his whole duty. And again, at the battle of Fair 
Oaks, on the 31st of May, and June 1st, he had command of the Regiment, 
I being temporarily in command of the Brigade, where he acted especially 
well, and fought bravely and with great success. He was also with the Regi- 
ment during the seven day's battles, and at Malvern Hill, in the capacity of 
Lieutenant-Colonel, performed his duty well. He resigned and left the com- 
mand at Harrison's Landing, about the 23d of July, 1862, for the purpose of 
joining another Regiment. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant. 

J. H. HOBART WARD, 

Brigadk'f- General. 

This letter was indorsed by General Sedgwick, as follows: 

" Major Baird was under my command for several months. He always 
performed his duty with zeal and fidelity. I know nothing in regard to his 
conduct under fire, but I have such confidence in General Ward, as a brave 
and just officer, that I am willing to endorse his statement. 

"JOHN SEDGWICK, 

" Major-th-neral" 

" lie was commissioned Colonel, May 3d, lSf.t, with rank from April 18th, 1864, but ou 
account of the reduced numbers of the Regiment, he was not mustered in as Colonel. 



354 126th Regiment Kew York Volunteers 

[Letter of Colonel Sheeeill.] 

" Head-quarters 126th Regiment New York Volunteers, j 
" Camp near Union Mills, Va., March 3d, 1863. 

"To his Excellency, the President: 

" Mr. Wm. H. Baird, a citizen of New York, claims that injustice has 
been done him by the military commission appointed to investigate the 
matter of the disgraceful surrender of Harper's Ferry, on the 15th of Sep- 
tember last, and, to the extent of my knowledge, desires me to vindicate 
him in respect to that affair. 

" Major Baird came to Virginia, last August, in the capacity of Major of 
this Regiment, and was exceedingly useful to it as a drill-master, having 
acted in the capacity of Major, for a long time, in the 38th New York Vol- 
unteers, where myself not only, but the military authorities of the State 
had been most favorably impressed in relation to his bravery and gallant 
bearing during the many conflicts which that Regiment had passed through. 

"During the time of the first attack upon Maryland Heights, the Major 
did, according to my best knowledge and belief, discharge his whole duty as 
an officer. 

During the second attack, my attention was not so particularly drawn in 
the direction of the right of the line, where he was located, supposing the 
left to be in most danger. 

That I ordered him back to the line of battle is wholly false, but, on the 
contrary, I left the field that day without a suspicion that he had failed to 
discharge his whole duty, and it was some time subsequent before I heard 
an intimation from any source that such w r as not the fact. 

I am induced to make this statement in consequence of having learned 
that there is testimony on record going to show that I was cognizant of 
disgraceful conduct on the part of Major Baird on Maryland Heights, and 
tried to persuade him to do his duty, which I repeat is wholly false. 
I am, most respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

E. SHERRILL, 
Colonel Commanding. 

Major Philo D. Phillips, 

Was born in Bristol, Ontario county, New York, in 1831, and 
was by occupation a house-builder. He assisted in recruiting 
Company D, 27th New York Volunteers, in the spring of 1861, 
and was commissioned and mustered First Lieutenant in that 
Company, with rank from May 7th, 1861; was wounded at the 
battle of Bull Run, July 1st, 1861 ; was promoted to be Captain 
of the same Company, with rank from November 7th, 1861 ; and 
was discharged for disability, on tender of resignation, April 
24th, 1862. 



Biographical Sketches. 355 

He assisted to recruit Company D, 126th New York Volun- 
teers, and was commissioned and mustered Captain of this Com- 
pany, with rank from August 9th, 1802 ; was promoted to be 
Major of the Regiment, November 27th, 1862. He was sent to 
hospital at Georgetown, D. C, sick, June 24th, 1863, and 
remained absent, sick, till September 1st, 1863, when he rejoined 
his Regiment, and was discharged for disability, on tender of 
resignation, October 29th, 1863, by Special Order No. 242, Head- 
quarters 2d Army Corps. 

He was in the battle of First Bull Run while in the 27th Xew 
York Volunteers, and in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Aubixm 
Ford and Bristow while with the 126th Xew York Volunteers. 

Major J. Smith Brown 

Was born at Hammondsport, Steuben county, Xew York, in 1835 ; 
and his father having, in 1855, moved to Penn Yan, he went with 
his family, and soon thereafter entered Yale college, but on 
account of ill health was compelled, after a few weeks, to aban- 
don a collegiate course. He subsequently made two trips to 
Europe, for his health, traveling over England, Scotland and 
Ireland. On his return he entered into business in St. Louis, 
where he remained until the breaking out of the rebellion, when 
he immediately threw up a lucrative position, and returning home, 
enlisted as a private in Colonel Bekdan's United States Sharp- 
shooters, on the 27th of May, 1801. Pie was soon promoted to 
Corporal, and then Sergeant-Major, and acted as Adjutant of the 
Regiment with great efficiency, until October, 1SG2, when he was 
discharged to accept the adjutancy of the 126th Regiment, and 
was commissioned in that Regiment with rank from October 3d, 
1802. 

He joined the Regiment at Chicago, Xovember 17th, 1862. 

Though physically never very strong, he possessed indomi- 
table energy and perseverance, always faithful in the perform- 
ance of the duties of a soldier. He was absent sick from 
September 6th, 1863, till November 5th, 1863. Was promoted 
Major of the Regiment, November 20th, 1*63, with rank by 
commission from November 12th, 186-'! ; was on detached service 
at Madison, Wisconsin, as United States Inspector of that State 
from April 2oth, lsct, till May 11th, 1865. lie rejoined his 



356 126 tb Regime xt New York Volunteers. 

Regiment near Alexandria, Virginia, and was mustered out with 
the Regiment, June 3d, 1865. While with the 1st United States 
Sharp Shooters, he was in the following battles : Big Bethel, 
Yorktown, Williamsburg, Hanover Court-house, Mechanicsville, 
Gaines Mills, Savage Station, Glendale, Malvern Hill, Second Bull 
Run, South Mountain, and Antietam. And while with the 126th 
New York Volunteer, he was in the battles of Gettysburg and 
Mine Run. Major Brows was commissioned as Lieutenant- 
Colonel, May 2d, 1864, with rank from April 18th, 1864; and 
•Colonel, July 27th, 1864, with rank from same date; but was 
never mustered in as Lieutenant-Colonel or Colonel, on account of 
reduced numbers of the Regiment. He returned to Penn Yan, 
where he resided until the 27th of April, 1866, when he died from 
disease contracted in the service. Major Brown left a wife and 
one child. 

Adjutant A. S. Wheeler 

Was born in Warwick, Orange county, N. Y., in 183^. He 
entered Geneva (now Hobart) College in 1847, and graduated in 
1851. In July, 1862, while holding the professorship of the 
Greek lansmao-e and literature in Hobart College, Geneva, he was 
invited by Colonel Sherrill and the chairman of the War Com- 
mittee of the senatorial district (Honorable Chas. J. Folger) to 
accept temporarily the Adjutancy of the 126th Regiment New 
York Volunteers, then to be recruited, for the purpose of assisting 
in its organization. The long summer vacation of the college, 
which had just commenced, left him free for two months. He 
accordingly accepted the position offered, and was mustered in 
for three years, with rank from July 17th, 1862. He accompanied 
the Regiment to its first camp at Harper's Ferry, and was, on 
tender of resignation, honorably discharged from the service Sep- 
tember 5th, 1862, by Special Order No. 82, Head-quarters Middle 
Department 8th Army Corps, Baltimore, Md. 

Adjutant Spencer F. Lincoln 

Was born in the town of South Bristol, Ontario county, New 
York, on the 10th day of February, 1838. He was reared on a 
farm, and prepared for college at Lima, New York, and entered 
the sophomore class at Union College in 1857, and graduated in 



Biographical Sketches. 357 

I860, when he commenced the study of law in the office of Pottle 
& Lincoln, in the village of Naples, New York. He remained 
there but a short time, and in the summer of 1861 he entered the 
law office of H. 0. Ciiesebeo, Esq., of Canandaigua, as a student, 
and continued to prosecute the study of law there until the 19th 
of July, 1862, when, in response to the President's call for volun- 
teers, he enrolled his name a soldier for his country, and, with 
Philo D. Phillips and Charles A. Richardson, assisted in 
recruiting Company D, 126th New York Volunteers. Having a 
good address, and being a ready speaker, he met with extraordi- 
nary success in recruiting for his Company, and contributed not 
a little, by awakening an interest and arousing the enthusiasm of 
the people, to recruiting in the county for the other Companies of 
the Regiment. He was commissioned and mustered Second 
Lieutenant, with rank from August 9th, 1862, the date of 
his Company organization; and on the 27th day of December, 
1862, he was promoted First-Lieutenant in the same Company. 
At Gettysburg, Captain Richardson having been wounded, in the 
afternoon of the 2d of July, Lieutenant Lincoln assumed com- 
mand of his Company, and continued in command during the 
remainder of the battle, and until the 12th day of August follow- 
ing, when he was seized with a fever, induced by hardships of 
the Gettysburg campaign, and was sent to the Seminary Hospital 
at Georgetown, on the 12th day of September following, and was 
absent, sick, until October 22d, 1868. He was detailed Acting 
Adjutant of the Regiment, on the field at Mine Run, November 
24th, 1863, and on the 7th of December following was appointed 
Adjutant of the Regiment, and was afterward duly commissioned 
as such, and served in that capacity till June 16th, 1864, when he 
was wounded, in a charge on the enemy in front of Petersburg, 
by a musket shot through the left arm, resulting in an amputation 
of that arm near the shoulder, from the effects of which he died 
at Seminary Hospital, Georgetown, D. C, on the 9th day of Jul)', 
1864. On the 14th of June, two days before he received his fatal 
wound, a commission as Captain was issued to him, from Albany, 
with rank from May 3d, 1S64. 

Adjutant Lincoln was a young man of much promise, whose 
ability and worth were not appreciated except by those who 
knew him most intimately. He fell with thousands of others, a 



358 126 tu Regiment Xew York Volunteers. 

costly sacrifice freely offered upon the altar of his country. May 
the sweet incense of such sacrifices go up through all time from 
the hallowed places that once knew them ; and may the virtues 
of such patriots ever be cherished in the memories of those who 
live after them. Adjutant Lincoln participated in the following 
battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, 
where he was slightly wounded by the explosion of a shell, the 
Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolopotomoy, 
Cold Harbor and Petersburg. 

Adjutant John F. Randolph 

Was born in Milo, Yates county, Xew York, in 1838, and was by 
occupation a merchant. He enlisted as a private in Company E, 
126th New York Volunteers, August 15th, 1862; was detailed as 
Adjutant's clerk in October, 1862; appointed Corporal January 
1st, 1863, appointed Sergeant-Major Jidy 2d, 1863, vice Henry P 
Cook, killed in battle ; promoted Second Lieutenant in Company 
E ; date of muster, February 9th, 1864; date of rank by commis- 
sion, April 4th, 1864; was wounded at Spottsylvania, May 12th, 
1864; rejoined his Regiment August loth, 1864; was appointed 
Adjutant, September 22, 1864, and was mustered out with the 
Regiment. 

He was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine run, Morton's Ford, the Wil- 
derness, Po River, Spottsylvania, Deep Bottom, Ream's Station, 
Petersburg, Boydton road, Sutherland's Station, Farmville, and 
Appomattox. 

Surgeon Fletcher M. Hammond 

Was born in Pleasant Valley, at the head of Crooked Lake (since 
called Hammondsport), in March, 1815. He was reared on a 
farm, and worked at farm labor until manhood, when he com- 
menced the study of medicine with E. D. Pulling, M. D., of 
Bath, Steuben county, New York, in 1840. In 1841 he went to 
Albany, and prosecuted his studies in the office of J. P Boyd, 
M. D., and at the Albany Medical College, until the year 1844, 
when he graduated and commenced the practice of his profession 
in Penn Yan, Yates county, New York. He continued in the 
practice of medicine at that place until he was appointed Surgeon 



Biographical Sketches. 359 

of the 126th Regiment, Xew York Volunteers, in July, 1862, 
when lie entered upon his duties in the organization of the Regi- 
ment, and was commissioned and mustered its Surgeon, with 
rank from July 15th, 1862. He accompanied the Regiment to 
the field, and to Maryland Heights in the engagement there. 

He continued on duty with the Regiment till after its exchange 
and return to the field again ; but in January, 1863, he was assigned 
to duty on the staff of General Hays, as Surgeon-in-Chief of the 
Brigade, and established a hospital at Union Mills, Va., and 
when in the spring of 1863 the head-quarters were removed to 
Centreville, the hospital was moved thither also. 

When the Brigade was assigned to the Army of the Potomac 
as the 3d Brigade 3d Division 2d Corps, Doctor Hammond con- 
tinued Surgeon in-Chief of the Brigade through the Gettysburg 
compaign, and the battles of Auburn, Bristow, Mine Run and 
Morton's Ford ; and when the army was consolidated, and the 
Brigade increased by other Regiments, and assigned to the 1st 
Division of the 2d Corps as the 3d Brigade of that Division, 
Surgeon Hammond was still continued Surgeon-in-Chief, and was 
attached to the field hospital of the 1st Division of the 2d Corps 
during the campaign from the Rapidan to Petersburg. 

In the latter part of June, 1864, he was ordered to City Point 
to organize and establish the Base Hospital, of the 1st Divi- 
sion, 2d Corps, after accomplishing which, he was ordered to 
organize, establish, and take charge of the hospital for the 
colored troops of the Army of the Potomac, at City Point. 
This he did, and remained in charge of this hospital from Septem- 
ber to the 20th of the following December, when he was ordered 
on detached duty as Medical Inspector for the Western Division 
of the State of New York ; with head-quarters at Elmira. While 
on this duty he made three tours of inspection of the Provost- 
Marshalls' Head-quarters, and of the recruits at the following 
places, including the rebel prison in Elmira : Elmira, Utica, Syra- 
cuse, Sacki'tt's Harbor, Auburn, Canandaigua, Rochester, Lock- 
port, Buffalo, Dunkirk and Binghamton. 

lie returned to the held on the 20th day of the following 
March, and was assigned to duty on the staff of Major-General 
Milks, as Surgeon-in-Chief of the 1st Division, 2d Corps, and 
served in that capacity during the closing campaigns of the war, 



360 126th Regiment New York Volunteers.- 

and was mustered out with his Regiment, June 2d, 1865. He 
then returned to Penn Yan and resumed the practice of his pro- 
fession. 

Surgeon Hammond was a man who could be fully appreciated 
only by those who knew him well. Within his large and manly 
breast beat a warm and sympathetic heart, ever ready to do good 
and to alleviate suffering. It was his nature not to make loud 
professions of sympathy, tickling the ears with smooth words, 
but rather with skill and indefatigable perseverance, to contribute 
to the comfort of the sick and the wounded in the hospital or on 
the field, and if possible to restore them to health ; taking neither 
thought or care that his efforts for their s;ood should ever be 
known by those for whom he labored. 



o 



Surgeon Charles S. Hoyt 
Was born in Ridgefield, Fairfield county, Ct., June 8th, 1822. 
He commenced the study of medicine in 1843, and engaged in the 
practice of his profession, in Potter, Yates county, New York, in 
the spring of 1847. When the war broke out he took an active 
part in recruiting in Yates county, and in sustaining the loyal 
feeling first awakened ; and when the call for three hundred 
thousand volunteers was made, in July, 1862, he was appointed 
by Governor Morgan one of the War Committee of the twenty- 
sixth senatorial district. 

He immediately entered upon the duty of recruiting, and 
identified himself with the 126th Regiment, and, having assisted 
in the examination of the men, was commissioned and mustered 
Assistant Surgeon of the Regiment, with rank from August 11th, 
1862. He accompanied the Regiment to Harper's Ferry, and 
was ordered on duty at the post hospital there September 1st, 
1862, and was continued on duty there after the surrender of that 
post until the 11th of October following, when the sick and 
wounded were transferred to Annapolis, Md., and he joined his 
Regiment at Chicago, 111., arriving there October 29th. 

Surgeon Hammond having been detailed Brigade Surgeon, 
December 12th, 1863, Assistant Sui-geon Hoyt became Acting 
Surgeon of the Regiment, and, excepting absence, on account of 
sickness, from September 22d, 1863, to November 13th, 1863, he 
retained that charge until the 20th of May, 1864, when he was 



Biographical Sketches. 361 

promoted to be Surgeon of the 39th New York Volunteers. On 
the 10th of June following, he was detached as executive officer 
of the 1st Division, 2d Corps hospital, by Special Order No. 
441, Head-quarters 1st Division 2d Army Corps, and continued 
on that duty until January 12th, 1865, when he was detailed 
Surgeon in charge of the hospital during the absence of Surgeon 
J. A. Wisiiaet, 140th Pennsylvania Volunteers. On the 28th of 
March following he returned to his former duty of executive 
officer, and on the 25th of May, 1865, he again became Surgeon 
in charge of the hospital, and continued on that duty until his 
discharge on the muster out of his Regiment, on the 1st of July, 
1865, when he returned to his home, in Yates county, and 
resumed the practice of medicine. 

Surgeon Hoyt was on duty with the army in all the battles in 
which the 126th Regiment New York Volunteers was engaged, 
except Auburn Ford and JBristow Station, and being with the 
Regiment a large portion of the time he became more generally 
acquainted with the officers and enlisted men of the Regiment 
than any other officer. 

Surgeon Hoyt was assiduous in his attentions to his charge 
and devoted to his duty, ever providing and improvising as 
necessities required, comforts and accommodations for the sick 
and wounded. Having been detailed to accompany the sick to- 
Washington just before the movement on Gettysburg in 1863, he 
rejoined the Regiment at Frederick City, Maryland, and being 
without a horse, he marched on foot to Gettysburg, was on duty 
as field Surgeon, attending to the wounded at times even on the 
line of battle. When the army left Gettysburg he procured the 
body of the lamented Suerkill and accompanied it to Baltimore, 
Maryland, where sorrowing friends from Geneva, New York, 
relieved him of the sacred trust. He immediately rejoined the 
army and marched on foot with the men to Elk Run, attending to 
his arduous duties, and, by his example, encouraging many a weary 
and faint soldier to eke out his strength till rest and refreshment 
came to his relief. 

While executive officer of the Division hospital he brought 
everything into order and system so that all parts worked 
smoothly together without delays or jars. "With the musicians 
of the Divhion, organized into a Company under an officer — a strict 



362 126th Regiment New Yobk Volunteers. 

disciplinarian — who had charge of erecting, taking down and 
removing hospital tents and accommodations, bringing in and 
carrying out the wounded and such as had died ; with a corps of 
nurses to attend to the sick and wounded, and cooks to provide 
them nourishment and food, and in fine with a complete system 
■of division of labor and duty, everything was done with such 
dispatch that the Hospital accommodations seemed ever to 
accompany the Division, and however rapid the movements of 
the army, or sudden the enemy was engaged, the wounded 
found well appointed hospital arrangements in the rear, where 
were in attendance, nurses in waiting, cooks to prepare food, and 
added to all the Sanitary and Christian Commissions to shower 
with a lavish hand, unexpected but much needed and tempting 
delicacies and comforts. 

For the position of executive officer of the hospital, Surgeon 
Hoyt was peculiarly adapted, as many thousand maimed and 
crippled soldiers who came under his charge can now testify, 
with grateful feelings for the uniform kindness and attention upon 
all occasions received at his hands. 

Assistant Surgeon Pierre D. Peltier 

Was born at Fort Gratiot, Michigan, on the 15th of November, 
1835. He was reared and educated in the State of New York, 
and, after a regular coarse in the study of medicine, he entered 
upon its practice in Ontario county, New York ; and while the 
126th New York Yolunteers was being recruited, he was appointed 
Assistant Surgeon of the Regiment, and was commissioned and 
mustered as such, with rank from August 11th, 1862. He served 
with his Regiment until the latter part of August, 1863, when he 
was attacked with camp fever, induced by the arduous duties per- 
formed during the Gettysburg campaign, and exposures in the field, 
and on account of continued ill health he was discharged from the 
service while in the field, on the 3d day of November, 1863, by 
Special Order No. 285, Head-quarters Army of the Potomac. In 
the spring of 1864 he re-entered the service, and was appointed 
Acting Post Surgeon at Martinsburg, West Virginia, but at the 
close of the summer campaign of 1804 he again retired from the 
service, and engaged in the practice of his profession, at Clifton 
Springs, New York. 



Biographical Sketches. 363 

Surgeon Peltier, while with the Regiment, won the full confi- 
dence of the officers and men under his charge, as well as of his 
medical associates, by his skill and success as a Physician and 
Surgeon, and endeared himself to all by his uniform kindness, his 
genial and social qualities as a gentleman, and by his unfailing 
fund of pleasant wit and humor, that never required a victim. 

Assistant Surgeon Ferdinand M. Pasco 

Enlisted as a private in Company I, 111th New York Volunteers, 
and was promoted to be Assistant Surgeon in the 126th New York 
Volunteers, November 6th, 1864, vice Assistant Surgeon Hoyt, 
promoted, and served with the Regiment till the close of the war, 
and was mustered out with the Regiment. 

Captain John K. Loring 
Was commissioned and mustered Quartermaster of the 126th New 
York Volunteers, with rank from July 17th, 1862; served with 
the Regiment till May 12th, 1863, when he was detached, Acting 
Quartermaster of the Brigade ; was promoted to be Captain and 
Commissary of Subsistence July 29, 1864 ; and served in that 
capacity in the Army of the Potomac until the close of the war, 
when he was mustered out of the service. Captain Loring was 
breveted Major, in the spring of 1865, for faithful and efficient 
service in the field. 

Quartermaster John C. Stainton 

Was born in Geneva, New York, in 1833, and was, by occupa- 
tion, a grocer, lie enlisted August 7th, 1S62, in Company E, 
126th New York Volunteers, and was appointed Sergeant on the 
organization of the Company; served as Adjutant's clerk until 
October 19, 1863, when he was appointed First Sergeant; was 
promoted to be Second Lieutenant December 22d, 1862; was 
iletaclied to command the ambulance corps of the Brigade, from 
January 4th, 1863, to may 12, 1863, when he was appointed act- 
um; Regimental Quartermaster of his Regiment, and continued 
in this duty until in November, 1804, when he was detailed to 
take charge of the ammunition train of the 1st. Division, 2d Corps. 
lie was promoted to be First Lieutenant, October 27th, 1863, 
vice Lieutenant Jacois Sheiimax, of Company E, deceased ; was 



364 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

appointed Regimental Quartermaster, September 1st, 1864; was 
in charge of the 1st Division, 2d Corps ammunition train from 
March 15th, 1865, to May 15th, 1865, and was mustered out with 
the Regiment. 

Chaplain T. Spencer Harrison 

Was born in Poughkeepsie, New York, July 5th, 1820. He was 
licensed to preach in 1844, and after a course of six years scien- 
tific and theological studies, he was ordained to the Christian 
ministry, and settled as pastor over the church in Pembroke, 
New York. At the breaking out of the war, and until recruiting 
commenced for the 126th New York Volunteers, he was pastor 
of the Baptist Church in Dundee, Yates county, New York, but 
he engaged earnestly in recruiting for the 126th New York 
Volunteers, and, resigning his position as pastor of his church, 
he enlisted in Company B of that Regiment August 2d, 1862, 
and from that time devoted his attention to the interests of the 
Regiment. Upon the organization of the Company he was 
appointed Sergeant, and did duty as such, and upon the organi- 
zation of the Regiment he was appointed its Chaplain, August 
22d, 1862, and by direction of the Colonel he received the colors 
presented to the Regiment at Geneva by the ladies of the 26th 
senatorial district, and acknowledged the gift in an appropriate 
speech. He was on Maryland Heights when Colonel Sherrill 
was wounded, and assisted him off the Heights, and attended 
him until he reached the Relay House, near Baltimore, where the 
Colonel met his friends from home. Chaplain Harrison then 
joined his Regiment, accompanied it to Chicago, and thence back 
to the field again, remaining with his Regiment in the perform- 
ance of his proper duties. He was also at Gettysburg, Auburn 
Ford, Bristow Station, the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna, 
Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor and Petersburg. He was detached on 
duty at the 1st Division hospital by order of the General com- 
manding the Division, August 9th, 1864, and remained on such 
duty till May 27th, 1865, when he was relieved and returned to 
his Regiment, then near Alexandria, Virginia, and was discharged 
with the Regiment. The duties of a Chaplain do not require him 
to take part in an engagement, yet in active service he is fre- 
quently under fire, and at every battle is called upon to witness 



Biographical Sketches. 365 

the most heart-rending scenes of the sick, the wounded and the 
dying, as they are brought to the rear. 

It is for him to give aid, comfort and consolation, to receive 
many last messages, and to transmit them to the bereaved rela- 
tives or friends in distant homes. Many soldiers can testify to 
the kind offices and attentions of Chaplain Harrison in their 
behalf when maimed and bleeding they had been borne from the 
ranks where they fell in battle, and when prostrated by sickness 
or wounds they were lying in the hospital ; and many bereaved 
families well remember the letters of condolence which they have 
received from him in the hour of affliction, when the tender 
chords of affection and love which had connected hearts at home 
with hearts in the field vibrated in sympathetic unison throughout 
times of danger and trial, had suddenly been broken by the fatal 
bullet or other instrument of death. 

Captain John F. Aikins 
Was born in 1826. In the spring of 1861 he assisted to recruit 
Company " C " 33d New York Volunteers, and was commissioned 
and mustered Captain of the Company, with rank from April 
30th, 1861, and was discharged on tender of resignation July 
28th, 1861. 

He assisted in recruiting Company " G" 126th New York Vol- 
unteers, and was commissioned Captain of this Company with 
rank from August 15th, 1862, and was discharged on tender of 
resignation March 4th, 1863, by Special Order, No. 21, Head- 
quarters Department of Washington. 

He was in the battle of Harper's-Ferry. 

Captain Richard A. Bassett 

Was born in 1820. He assisted in recruiting Company B, 126th 
Xew York Volunteers, was commissioned and mustered First 
Lieutenant in this Company with rank from August 8th, 1862, 
the date of its organization ; commanded his Company during 
the absence of Captain Coi.kman on detached service from July 
20th, 1X63, until October 1st, 1863; was absent, sick, from Octo- 
ber 27th, lsr>3, until December 20th, 1K63 ; was promoted Cap- 
tain in Company E, date of rank by muster, March 27th, 1X64, 
by commission .March 1st, 1864; was detached in command of 



866 126th Regiment Xew York Volunteers 

the provost guard at head-quarters, 2d Army Corps from April 
4th, 1864, till November 17th, 1864, when he received leave of 
absence on account of sickness, and remained absent, sick, until 
discharged on account of physical disability, January 18th, 1865, 
by Special Order No. 17, Head-quarters Army of the Potomac. 

While with his Regiment he was in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg and Morton's Ford ; and while in command of 
the provost guard he was Avith the 2d Corps in the battles in 
which that corps was engaged, from April 4th, 1864, till Novem- 
ber 17th, 1864. 

Cai>taix John H. Broitgh 
Was born in 1831. He assisted in recruiting Company E, of 
the 126th New York Volunteers, and was duly commissioned and 
mustered Second Lieutenant in that Company with rank from 
August 14th, 1862, and served with his Company until October 
25th, 1862, when he was detailed acting Adjutant of the Regi- 
ment and served as such till November 15th, 1862. 

Pie was subsequently promoted Captain in Company E, with 
rank from December 22d, 1862, and commanded his Company 
until wounded in action at Gettysburg, July 2d, 1863. 

He returned to his Regiment from absence on account of 
wounds, August 18th, 1863, but was sent to hospital, sick, Octo- 
ber 12th, 1S63, and was honorably discharged the service March 

7 7 „ O 

7th, 1864, on account of wounds and to enable him to accept an 
appointment as First Lieutenant in the Veteran Reserve Corps, 
by Special Order No. 108, War Department. 

He was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg. 

Captain Morris Browx, Jr., 

Was born at Hammondsport, New York, in August, 1842. He 
entered Hamilton College in I860, and while at home in Penn 
Yan, during the summer vacation, he enlisted in Company A, 
126th New York Volunteers, on the 11th day of August, 
1862, and was appointed First Sergeant of the Company. He 
was promoted to be First Lieutenant, December 13, 1862, vice 
Lieutenant Barras, discharged, and was promoted Captain, April 
24th, 1863. 

At the battle of Gettysburg m July, 1863, he captured a rebel 



Biographical Sketches. 367 

flag, on which was inscribed "Harper's Ferry, 18(.;2," with the 
names of ten other battles. This flag is now preserved in the "War 
Department, at Washington, with his name thereon as the captor ; 
and a medal was awarded him for the capture, under an act of 
Congress, which was, after his death, transmitted to his father. 

He was detached on recruiting service from February 10th, 1864, 
to April 5th, 18(34, and was in command of the Regiment at vari- 
ous times during the spring and summer of 1864. 

He was wounded while storming the enemy's works at Spottsyl- 
vania, but soon returned to duty again, and participated in the 
subsequent battles of the campaign, until June 22d, when he was 
killed in action at the left of Petersburg, while in command of the 
Regiment. 

The Regiment was in the advance near the left of General 
Barlow's Division, when the enemy, passing through a gap at 
the left of Barlow's Division, struck that Division on its flank 
and soon doubled up the line with great loss. 

It was while the Regiment was retreating, fighting as they 
retired, that Captain Brown was instantly killed by a musket shot 
in the head. His body fell on ground that was between the sub- 
sequent lines and was never recovered. Captain Brown proved 
himself an able and brave officer. He was in the following 
battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Sta- 
tion, Mine Run, the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North 
Anna, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, and before Petersburg. 

The following letter recommending Captain Brown for promo- 
tion, shows the high estimation in which he was held by his com- 
manding officer : 

Head-quarters 3d Brigade, 1st Division, ) 
2n Corps, in the Field, June 17, 18U4. f 

To His Excellency, Governor Seymour: 

I most respectfully call your attention to the case of Captain Mourns 
Bkown, Jr., 120th Now York Volunteers. During the fearful charge of 
last night, after his Colonel was killed, he assumed command of the Regi- 
ment, and behaved with great gallantry after reaching the enemy's works 
and driving them out. Captain IJnowN performed several acts of personal 
daring, which called forth my highest praise at the time, going at my request 
from the right to the left and in person ascertaining the position of the 
enemy upon our left flank, luting all the time under a heavy fire. His con- 
duct upon the occasion was such, as in my judgment entitles him to promo- 



368 126TH REGI3TENT JVEW Y ORK VOLUNTEERS. 

tion, and I most respectfully recommend that your Excellency promote him 
to the position of a field officer in his Regiment. Captain Brown is an 
officer of a high order of intelligence, and capable of filling any office to 
which he may be promoted. His own conduct, as well as that of his Regi- 
ment and his lamented Colonel Baird, who was killed, were splendid, the 
Brigade losing in the charge about one-third of their number of enlisted 
men, and nearly two-thirds the number of commissioned officers present. 
Trusting Captain Brown's case may meet with your early attention, I have 

the honor to remain, 

Your obedient servant, 

C. D. MAC DOUGALL, 

Col. l\\th N. T. Vols. 
CorrHdg 3d Brigade, 1st Div., 2d Corps. 

A remarkable fatality seems to have attended the students of 
Hamilton College who enlisted in the 126th New York Volun- 
teers : 

Darius C. Sackett, of the class of 1864, enlisted in Company 
D, and was severely wounded by a musket shot in the leg, on 
Maryland Heights, Virginia, September 13th, 1862, in consequence 
of which he was discharged from the service. 

Henry P Cook, of the class of 1863, enlisted in Company B, 
and was instantly killed by a musket shot at Gettysburg, Penn- 
sylvania, July 2d, 1863. 

Morris Brown, Jr., of the class of 1864, enlisted in Company 
A, and was instantly killed by a musket shot, June 22d, 1864, as 
before stated. 

George W Sheldon, of the class of 1863, enlisted in Com- 
pany F, and was instantly killed by a musket shot in action at 
Chapin's Farm, Virginia, September 29th, 1864. 

These four students, imbued with the spirit of patriotism, 
entered the service from a sense of duty ; not as officers, but as 
privates, ready to serve in the ranks, or, if called to a higher 
position, to command and lead where duty called, through dan- 
ger, or even unto death. 

Captain Truman N Burrill 

Was born in Elbridge, Onondaga county, in 1832, and was a 
merchant by occupation. He assisted in recruiting Company A, 
126th New York Volunteers, and was commissioned and mustered 
Captain of the Company, with rank from August 4th, 1862. He 



Biographical Sketches. 369 

was absent sick from February 4th, 1863, to April 4th, 1863, 
when he was honorably discharged the service on account of 
physical disability, by Special Orders No. 187, War Department, 
Adjutant-General's office. On the 30th of June, 1864, Captain 
Burrell was commissioned Captain and Commissary of Subsist- 
ence United States Volunteers, and reported for duty August 1st, 

1864, and Avas assigned to duty in the office of the Chief Com- 
missary of Subsistence, at Washington, D. C. He was ordered 
to the field September 20th, 1864, and assigned to duty in the 2d 
Brigade, 2d Division, 18th Army Corps; was transferred Decem- 
ber 5th, 1864, to the 3d Brigade, 3d Division, 24th Army Corps; 
was transferred January 6th to the artillery Brigade, 27th Army 
Corps; was transferred March 10th, 1865, to Point of Rocks, 
Virginia, as Post Commissary; was assigned to duty June 18th, 

1865, as Chief Commissary of Subsistence for the district of the 
Roanoke; was ordered July 8th, 1865, to New Orleans on duty, 
and on the 28th of August, 1865, was assigned to duty on the 
staff of Major-General P H. Sheridan as Inspector of Subsist- 
ence for the Military Division of the Gulf, embracing the States 
of Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas. He was relieved 
December 1st, 1865, and ordered on duty at Baton Rouge, Loui- 
siana, as Post Commissary of Subsistence, and was honorably 
discharged the service February 22d, 1866. 



Captain William A. Colemax 

Was born in 1830. He assisted in recruiting Company B, 
126th Xew York Volunteers, and was commissioned and mustered 
Captain of that Company, with rank from August 8th, 1862. 
He took command of the Regiment in the afternoon of July 3d, 
1803, at Gettysburg, upon Lieutenant-Colonel Bull taking com- 
mand of the Brigade, and remained in command of the Regiment 
till the return of Colonel Bull to the command, July 20th, 1863, 
when he was detached on duty at the draft depot at Elmira, 
New York, and remained absent on such duty till December 20th, 
1*03. He was discharged, on tender of resignation, March 18th, 
1S64, by Special Order Xo. 72, Head-quarters 2d Army Corps. 
He was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg. 



370 126th Regiment Xew Y.oek Yoluxteees. 



Captaix John B. Geddis 
Was born in Salem, Pennsylvania, in 1838, and was by occupa- 
tion a saddler. 

He enlisted in Company D, 126th New York Volunteers, on 
the 28th day of August, 1862, and was appointed 1st Sergeant 
on the organization of the Company. Was promoted to be 2d 
Lieutenant in Company D, November 27th, 1862. Was promo- 
ted to be 1st Lieutenant in Company D, February 25th, 1864. 
Was detached in command of the Regimental musicians of the 
1st Division 2d Army Corps, for duty at the Division field hos- 
pital, from May 10th, 1864, till September 10th, 1864. Was 
promoted to be Captain, in Company H, June 10th, 1864; date 
of rank, by commission, March 29th, 1864. Was transferred to 
Company C, on consolidation of the Regiment, December 25th, 
1864, and was in command of the Regiment from September 10th, 

1864, till March 31st, 1865, when he was wounded in action at 
Boydton road, and was absent, on account of wounds till May, 

1865, and was mustered out with his Regiment. 

Captain Geddis was commissioned Lieutenant-Colonel of the 
Regiment December 17th, 1864, with rank from June 17th, 1864, 
but was not mustered on account of orders for the consolidation 
of the Regiment. He was breveted Major Imited States Volun- 
teers for gallant conduct at the battle of Boydton road on the 
31st of March, 1865, with rank from that date. 

He was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, the Wilderness and 
Po River. 

Captain Orin J. Herendeex 

Was born in the town of Farmington, Ontario county, Xew York, 
on the 5th day of September, 1837, and was a farmer by occupa- 
tion. He was a young man of much promise, and his ability and 
character gave him great influence in the town in which he 
resided. He recruited Company H, with the assistance of First 
Lieutenant George W Redfield, and Second Lieutenant 
Alfred R. Clapp. He was mustered as Captain to date August 
16th, 1802. He served witli his Company and Regiment until 
July 3d, 1863, when he was killed in action at Gettysburg. He 



Biographical Sketches. 371 

was then in command of his Company, under a murderous fire, 
on the skirmish line in front of his Brigade, on Cemetery Hill, 
and was shot by a sharp-shooter, the bullet striking him in the 
thigh, severing the femoral artery, and causing death in a few 
minutes. At the moment he was shot the enemy advanced in 
force, and he had to meet death surrounded by his enemies, but 
he doubtless met his fate with the courage of a true Christian 
and a brave soldier. 

Captain Heeendeex was one of those genial characters who 
made friends of all with whom he became acquainted. He was 
generous to a fault, possessing a mild disposition yet always 
exhibiting such firmnes and decision of character as placed him 
in high estimation of both subordinates and superiors. 

His soldierly qualities were highly appreciated by his com- 
manding officers, who had the utmost confidence in his character, 
ability and courage. 

He was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg. 

Captain Henry D. Kipp 

Was born in 1831. He assisted in recruiting Company E. 126th 
New York Volunteers, and was commissioned and mustered 
Captain of the Company with rank from August 14th, 1862, and 
was discharged on tender of resignation, December 16th, 1862, 
by Special Order No. 95, Department of Washington. 
He was at the battle of Harper's Ferry. 

Captain Benjamin F Lee 
Was born in 1836, and was by occupation, a teacher. He assisted 
in recruiting Company I, 126th New York Volunteers, and was 
commissioned and mustered Captain of the Company, with rank 
from August 18th, 1*62. 

He was absent sick, from September 12th, 1S63, till November 
15th, 1H63; and was again absent sick, from March 21st, 1864, 
till April 13th, 1864, when he was discharged on tender of 
resignation, by Special Order No. 151, War Department, Adju- 
tant-General's Office. 

He was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Mine 
Run, and Morton's Ford. 

24 



372 126tji Regiment Xew York Volunteers. 

Captain Ira Mrxsox 

Was born in Tyre, Seneca county, 1ST Y., on the 8th day of July, 
1828, and was by occupation, a school teacher. 

He assisted in recruiting Company F, One Hundred and Twenty- 
sixth New York Volunteers, and was commissioned and mustered 
as First Lieutenant, in that company, with rank from August 15th, 

1862, the date of his Company organization; he was promoted to 
be Captain in Company F ; date of rank by commission, July 3d, 
1863; by muster, October 22d, 1863. 

He was mortally wounded at the battle of Po River, May 10th, 
1864, by a musket shot through his hips, and was conveyed to 
Armory Square Hospital, Washington, D. C, where he died on 
the 14th of the same month. 

He was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, September 
13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine 
Run, Morton's Ford, the Wilderness and Po River. 

Capt. Munson was a gallant officer, and won the special regard 
and respect of his associates and superiors, and was beloved by 
all. As a tribute of respect to his memory, and on account of his 
gallant conduct in the field, a commission dated June 16th, 1864, 
appointing him Major, with rank from April 18th, 1864, was 
issued by the Governor of the State, and sent to his lather, with 
a letter of condolence. It was a worthy tribute, but altogether 
too tardy. 

Captatx Ten Evck Muxsox 

Was born in East Bloomfield, New York, in 1835, and was by 
occupation a clerk. He assisted in recruiting Company F, and 
was commissioned and mustered Second-Lieutenant on the 15th 
day of August, 1862, with date of his Company's organization. 
He was sick, at Chicago, from October 14, 1862, till January 17th, 

1863, when he rejoined his Regiment, and was promoted to be 
First Lieutenant, October 22d, 1863. He was absent, sick, from 
November 15th, 1863, till December 31st, 1863 ; and was detached 
April 4th, 1864, on duty with the Provost Guard at Head-quarters 
2d Army Corps till November 5th, 1864, when, having been pro- 
moted to be Captain, September 1st, 1864, he was on the 5th of 
November, 1864, appointed Assistant Provost-Marshall, at Head- 



Biographical Sketches. 373 

quarters 2d Army Corps, and remained on such duty till the mus- 
ter-out of his Regiment, when he was discharged. 

He was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Bristow Station and Morton's Ford, and was with 
the Corps in his appropriate duty during the subsequent battles 
in which the Corps was engaged till the close of the war. 

Captain Tex Eyck Muxsox was the only original line officer 
of the Regiment who returned with the Regiment. 

Captaix Henry B. Owex 

Was born at Perrington, Monroe county, New York, in 1830, and 
was by occupation a mechanic. 

He enlisted in Company H, 126th New York Volunteers, 
August Uth, 1862 ; was appointed First Sergeant on the organi- 
zation of his Company; promoted to be Second Lieutenant in 
Company H, September 15th, 1862; again promoted to be First 
Lieutenant, March 14th, 1863, in the same Comj)any ; was 
wounded at the battle of Gettysburg, July 2d, 1863; rejoined his 
Regiment, from absence on account of wounds, August 6th, 1863. 
He was promoted to be Captain in Company H, date of rank 
by muster, October 22d, 1863, by commission July 3d, 1863 ; was 
absent on sick leave from November 21st, 1863, till December 23d, 
1863, and was killed in action at Po River, May 10th, 1804, while 
in command of his Company. 

He was in the following battles: Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Morton's Ford, the Wilderness and 
Po River. 

Captain Saxdfokd II. Platt 

Was born in 1841, and was by occupation a druggist clerk. At 
the breaking out of the war he eidisted as a private in the 14th 
Regiment New York State Militia for three months, and was 
discharged at the expiration of his term of service. In 1862, he 
assisted in recruiting Company G, 126th New York Volunteers, 
and was duly commissioned and mustered Second Lieutenant in 
that Company, with rank from August 15, 1862. Was promoted 
to be First Lieutenant in Company (t, January 6th, 1863. Was 
promoted to be Captain, in the same Company, March 4th, 180-'!. 
Was absent, sick, from August 19th, 1803, until January 7th, 

1804. 



374 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

On the 22d of June, 1864, all his superior officers in the Regi- 
ment having been killed or disabled, he took command of the 
Regiment, and continued in command till August 8th, 1864, 
when he was ordered to City Point for medical treatment, and 
did not again rejoin the Regiment. On the 25th of December, 
1864, he was transferred to Company E, on consolidation of 
the Regiment into a Battalion of five Companies; and on the 21st 
of March, 1865, he then being absent without leave, Special 
Order No. 137, Adjutant-General's Office, War Department, 
was issued dismissing him from the service, as of the 27th of 
February, 1865. 

He was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, the Wil- 
derness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolopotomoy, 
Cold Harbor, Petersburg, and Strawberry Plains. 

Captain Charles A. Richardson 

Was born in Cortland county, N. Y., in August, 1829. He was 
admitted to the bar in 1856, and engaged in the practice of law, 
at Canandaigua, in 1860. He assisted in recruiting Company D T 
126th New York Volunteers, and was commissioned and mus- 
tered First Lieutenant in that Company, with rank from August 
9th, 1862. 

He was promoted to be Captain November 27th, 1862. Was 
wounded at the battle of Gettysburg, July 2d, 1863 ; rejoined 
the Regiment August 5th, 1863. Was detached on recruiting- 
service to the State of New York from Jannary 19th, 1864, till 
May 27th, 1864. Was severely wounded in action in front of 
Petersburg, June 16th, 1864, and was honorably discharged, on 
account of wounds, September 3d, 1864, by Special Order No. 
292, War Department, Adjutant-General's Office. 

He was in the following battles: Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Tolopotomoy, Cold 
Harbor, and in front of Petersburg. 

He was commissioned Major June 14th, 1864, with rank from 
April 18th, 1864; but was not mustered on account of wounds 
received in action, and the reduced numbers of the Reo;iment. 



Biographical, Sketches. 375 



Captain Wixfield Scott 



"Was born in Novi, Oakland county, Michigan, in 1837. His 
father, James Scott, having removed to Covert, Seneca county, 
Kew York, in 1848, and engaged in farming there, young Scott 
was reared as a farmer boy until 1853, when he began his pre- 
paration for college. He graduated at the University of Roches- 
ter in 1859, and immediately entered the Rochester Theological 
Seminary, but, in 1861, he accepted a call to the pastorate of the 
Second Baptist Church in Syracuse, New York, where he remained 
until July 2 2d, 1862, when in response to the President's call for 
300,000 men he went to Ovid, in Seneca county, to assist in 
recruiting in that portion of the county, and being strongly urged 
to recruit a company as its Captain, for the 126th New York Vol- 
unteers, he consented ; applied for and received an authorization 
to recruit, appointed meetings in different parts of the county, 
and by August 4th had obtained twelve men ; on the 8th of 
August he started for Geneva, with a maximum company, most 
■of whom he had recruited in three days. His Com^iany w r as fully 
organized in camp on the 9th of August, 1862, and he was duly 
commissioned and mustered Captain as of that date. 

From the members of his church in Syracuse he received a 
beautiful parting gift, a sword, a belt and a sash, accompanied 
by a communication, giving him leave of absence to serve his 
country in the field, and expressing for him their high esteem and 
regard, and assuring him that they should follow him with their 
prayers, relying upon their Heavenly Father to bring him back 
to them in his own good time. 

Captain Scott was severely wounded on Maryland Heights, by 
a musket shot in his leg, fracturing the bone about half way 
between the knee and ancle; and was absent on account of his 
wound, among his friends in Seneca county, till January 3d, 1863, 
when lie returned to his command, and, although still on crutches, 
reported for duty, and took command of his Company He com- 
manded the Regiment at intervals in 1863, and through the 
battles of the Wilderness, Fo River and Spottsylvania, until the 
17th of May, 1^64, when relieved by the return of Colonel 
Bauu>. 

In the charge at Spottsylvania, May 12th, 1S04, he was struck 



376 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

in the left breast by a musket ball, the force of which was spent 
on a handkerchief and testament in his side pocket. On the 18th 
of May, at Spottsylvania, he was severely wounded ; a contusion 
of the inner side of the right thigh, caused, as he believed, by a 
shell passing between his legs, resulting in the sloughing off of 
the flesh, and so disabling him that he was discharged from the 
service at Annapolis, by order of the Secretary of War, Special 
Orders, Adjutant-General's office, Xo. 265. 

He was in the battles of Maryland Heights, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, the 
Wilderness, Po River and Spottsylvania. 

Captain Scott received, from his superior officers and from citi- 
zens, some very flattering testimonials and recommendations for 
promotion, in the spring and summer of 1864 ; but he was so dis- 
abled by his wounds, the one received on Maryland Heights not 
having healed while in the service, that he was discharged before 
receiving promotion. 

He resumed his studies at the Rochester Theological Seminary, 
and on the 1st day of January, 1865, he accepted a call to the 
pastorate of the Baptist church in Leavenworth, Kansas. 

Captain Isaac A. Seamaxs 

Was born in 1835, studied law, was admitted to the bar, and 
engaged in the practice of his profession at Naples, New York, 

He assisted in recruiting Company K, 126th New York Volun- 
teers, and was commissioned and mustered Second Lieutenant in 
this Company, with rank from August 20th, 1862, the date of its 
organization. 

He was promoted to be First Lieutenant, Company K, January 
24th, 1863 ; was slightly wounded at the battle of Gettysburg; 
was detached on duty at the draft rendezvous, Elmira, New 
York, from July 26th, 1863, till December 11th, 1863, and was 
promoted to be Captain in Company K ; date of rank by muster, 
October 22d, 1863; by commission, July 3d, 1863 ; and was hon- 
orably discharged the service April 27th, 1864, for disability, on 
tender of resignation. 

He was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg and Mor- 
ton's Ford. 



Biographical Sketches. 377 

Captain Isaac Shimer 

Was born in 1824. He assisted in recruiting Company F, 126th 
New York Volunteers, and was commissioned and mustered Cap- 
tain on the loth day of August, 1862, the date of his Company's 
organization, and served with his Regiment till killed at the bat- 
tle of Gettysburg, July 3d, 186-3. 

On the morning of that day Captain Shimer, under orders, 
took position, with his Company, on the Emmettsburg road, as a 
reserve to the advanced skirmish line, but under fire from some 
rebel sharp-shooters. Captain Shimer lay in line with his men, 
on the ground, near the center of his Company, and in raising 
his head a little, to view the position in front, his mouth being- 
open, a sharp-shooter's bullet entered his mouth, passed through 
and out at the base of the brain, killing him instantly. He died 
without a struggle or motion, except the falling of his head. His 
body was rolled on to two muskets, and four of his soldiers, 
springing up quickly, carried his body to the rear, where it was 
temporarily buried. His body was subsequently taken up, and 
conveyed to his home in Geneva, New York, where it was buried 
with the respect due a brave and gallant officer, who had sacri- 
ficed his life for his country. 

Captain Shimer was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg, and proved himself, on all occasions, a faithful and 
brave officer. He left a widow and a son to mourn his loss. 

Captain Charles M. Wueei.ek 

Was born in Canandaigua, X Y., on the 8th day of December, 
183 7. He prepared for college at the Canandaigua academy, 
entered Yale college in 1855, and graduated in 1859. He studied 
law in the office of Messrs. Smith cfc Lapiia.m, at Canandaigua, 
was admitted to the bar in June, 1861, and soon after engaged 
in the practice of his profession in Canandaigua. He assisted in 
recruiting Company K, 126th New York Volunteers, and was 
commissioned and mustered Captain of the Company, with rank 
from August 2<>th, 1S62. 

Captain Wueelek commanded his Company with credit and 
honor to himself and Kegiment, until he was killed at the battle 
of Oettyslmrg, Pa. On the morning of July 3d, 1863, Captains 



378 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

Wheeler, Scott and Heeesdeex, were ordered with their Com- 
panies to drive back the enemy's skirmishers in front of their Bri- 
gade, on Cemetery Hill ; and they advanced their commands under 
a terrible fire from the enemy's skirmishers and sharp-shooters, 
many of the latter being safely posted in a barn near the line, 
built of stone, brick and wood. These commands held the ground 
thus gained for some time at a great disadvantage, the fire of the 
enemy being murderous ; and it was during this time that Captain 
Wheeler was instantly killed by a sharp-shooter's bullet ; a fate 
which Captain Heeexdee.x met about the same time. Our skir- 
mishers were soon driven back, without an opportunity to remove 
the body of Captain Wheeler, which therefore remained, on the 
field until after the battle. 

His remains were taken to his home and buried on the 26th of 
July, with military honors ; two Companies of the 54th New York 
State National Guards, being then opportunely on duty at Canan- 
daigua, attended the funeral and furnished the proper escort. 

The funeral was attended by the members of the bar of the 
county in a body, who, at a meeting held for that purpose, passed 
resolutions befitting the occasion and expressive of their appre- 
ciation of Captain Wheeler while living, and of the profound 
sorrow which prevaded the society in which he had moved, on 
account of what seemed his untimely end. 

Capt. Wheeler was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Septem- 
ber 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, July 2d and 3d, 
1863. 

Captaix Ira Hart Wilder 

Was born in Canandaigua, New York, in 1840, and was by occu- 
pation a farmer. 

He enlisted in Company D, 126th New York Volunteers, on 
the 28th day of July, 1862 ; was appointed Sergeant on the 
organization of the Company ; was detached on duty at the draft 
depot at Elmira, New York, from July 26th, 1863, till July 1st, 
1864, when he rejoined the Regiment and was mustered First 
Lieutenant in Company D, he having been commissioned as such 
April 29th, 1864. 

He was promoted to be Captain in Company A ; date of rank 
by muster, August 28th, 1864; by commission, June 18th, 1864 . 



Biographical Sketches. 379 

and at intervals during 1864, was in command of the 126th New 
York Volunteers, the 125th New York Volunteers and the 57th 
New York Volunteers ; and was in command of the former after 
the 30th of March, 1865, until the surrender of LeE. 

He was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysbui-g, 
Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, Ream's Station, before Peters- 
burg, Boydton Road, Sutherland's Station, Farmville and Appo- 
mattox. 

First Lieutenant Samuel A. B arras 

Was born in 1828, and was a shoemaker by occupation. He 
assisted in recruiting Company D, 33d New York Volunteers, in 
Canandaigua, New York, and was commissioned and mustered as 
Second Lieutenant in that Company, with rank from May 7th, 

1861, and was discharged from the service on resignation, Janu- 
ary 6th, 1862. 

He assisted in recruiting Company A, 126th New York Volun- 
teers in Yates county, New York, and was commissioned and 
mustered in this Company as First Lieutenant, with rank from 
August 4, 1862; and was dismissed the service December 13th, 

1862, by Special Order No. 393, War Department, Adjutant- 
General's office. 

He was acting Adjutant of the Regiment from September 2d, 
1862, till October 9th, 1862, when he was summoned as a witness 
before the Harper's Ferry Investigating Commission, then sitting 
at Washington, and was absent till October 17th, 1862. 

He was in no battles excepting at Harper's Ferry, September 
14th and 15th, 1862, he having left his Regiment without orders 
when it became engaged on Maryland Heights, September 13th, 
1*62. 

First Lieutenant De Witt C. Fa ruing ton 
Was horn in Bellona, Yates county, New York, in 1*37, and was 
by occupation a cigarmaker. 

He enlisted in Company (4, 126th New York Volunteers, Aug- 
ust 6th, 1S62, and was appointed Sergeant-Major of the Regiment 
on its organization ; was promoted to be First Lieutenant in Com- 
pany II, December 2d, 1*62 '■> an d was discharged March 14th, 
1*63, on tender of resignation, by Special Order, No. 30, Head- 
quarters 22d Army Corps. 

He was in the battle of Harper's Ferry. 



380 12Gth Regiment Xew York Volunteers. 

First Lieutenant Charles Gage 

Was born in Canandaigua, New York, in 1842, and was by occu- 
pation a farmer. 

He enlisted in Company D, 126th New York Volunteers, July 
30th, 1862 ; was appointed Corporal on the organization of the 
Company; was acting First Sergeant from October 14th, 1863; 
was appointed Sergeant, March 1st, 1864; was appointed First 
Sergeant, May 27th, 1864 ; was promoted to be First Lieutenant 
in Company D ; date of rank by muster, August 28th, 1864 ; by 
commission, June 18th, 1864; and was absent, sick, from October 
26th, 1864, till March 9th, 1865, when he was discharged on 
account of Surgeon's certificate of disability, by Special Order, 
No. 115, Adjutant-General's office, War Department. 

He was commissioned Captain, December 7th, 1864, with rank 
from September 23d, 1864 ; but was unable to muster on account 
of illness. 

He was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, the 
Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolopotomoy, 
Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Deep Bottom and Strawberry Plains. 

First Lieutenant Milo H. Hopper 

Was born in Adrian, Michigan, in 1839, and by occupation was 
a blacksmith. He enlisted in Company D., 126th New York 
Volunteers, July 24th, 1862, and was appointed Corporal on the 
organization of the Company ; was absent, sick, from June 25th, 

1863, till July 29th, 1863 ; was promoted Sergeant, July 3d, 1863, 
and was Color Sergeant, carrying the regimental colors, from 
July 29th, 1863, till June 9th, 1864, when he was appointed 
Sergeant Major. He was severely wounded in action, June 23d, 

1864, before Petersburg, and was absent on account of wounds 
till December 26th, 1864; was promoted to be First Lieutenant 
in Company B, date of rank by muster, January 20th, 1865, by 
commission, January 2d, 1865 ; was again wounded in action at 
Boydton Road, March 31st, 1865 ; he rejoined the Regiment from 
absence on account of wounds in the following May ; and was 
mustered out with the Regiment June 2d, 1865. 

He was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Auburn Ford, 



Biographical Sketches. 381 

Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, the Wilderness, Po 
River, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, 
Petersburg and Boydton Road. 

Lieutenant Hopper received a commission as Captain, dated 
May 17th, 1865, with rank from February 27th, 1865; but was 
not mustered on account of orders for muster out of the Regiment. 

First Lieutenant Samuel Hughes 

Was born in Fayette, Seneca county, Xew York, in 1840, and 
was by occupation a blacksmith. 

He enlisted in Company G, 126th Xew York Volunteers, July 
10th, 1862; was appointed Sergeant on the organization of the 
Company; was promoted First Sergeant March 4th, 1863; 
wounded at Auburn Ford, October 14th, 1862, and at Spottsyl- 
vania, May 12th, 1864; promoted to be Second Lieutenant in 
Company G, date of rank by muster, September 10th, 1864, by 
commission January 18th, 1864; transferred to Company E on 
consolidation of the Regiment ; promoted to be First Lieutenant 
in Company A, date of rank by muster February 8, 186 5, by 
commission January 16th, 1865. 

He was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, Boyd- 
ton Road, Sutherland's Station, Farmville and Appomattox. 

Lieutenant Hughes was commissioned Captain April 22d, 
1865, with rank from March 9th, 1865, but was not mustered on 
account of the close of the war. 

First Lieutenant Asiiau Huxtoox, Jr. 

Was born at Manchester, Ontario county, in 1830, and wa.s 
reared a farmer. 

lie enlisted in Company II, 126th New York Volunteers, as a 
private, August 11th, 1S62; was promoted to be First Sergeant 
December 1st, 1862; Second Lieutenant in Company II, March 
14th, 1st;:; ; was wounded in action at Gettysburg, July 2d, 1863; 
rejoined his lieginicnt August 6th, 1863; was appointed Aide 
to Brigadier-General Owkn, commanding 3d Brigade, 3d Divi- 
sion, 2d Army Corps, September 19th, 1863; was promoted to be- 
First Lieutenant in Company II, date of rank by muster October 
22(1, 18(i;{; by commission July 2d, 18U3, and remained on Gene- 



382 1:26th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

ral Owen's staff till June 8th, 1864, when he died from a musket 
shot through his lungs, received in action at Cold Harbor, while 
on duty as Aide, June 5th, 1864. 

He was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, Wil- 
derness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolopotomoy, and 
Cold Harbor. 

Lieutenant Huntoon was a gallant officer, and a gentleman 
prised for his genial and companionable qualities. 

Fiest Lieutenant H. Clay Lawrence 

Was born in 1841. He assisted in recruiting Company K, 126th 
New York Volunteers, and was commissioned First Lieutenant 
in that Regiment, with rank from August 20th, 1862, and 
assigned to Company K ; and was honorably discharged the 
service, on tender of resignation, January 24th, 1863, by Special 
Order No. 20, Head-quarters 22d Army Corps. 
He was in the battle of Harper's Ferry. 

First Lieutenant Meletiah H. Lawrence, Jr., 

Was born in 1841. He assisted in recruiting Company B, 
126th New York Volunteers, and was commissioned and mus- 
tered Second Lieutenant in the Company, with rank from August 
8th, 1862. He was severely wounded at the battle of Gettys- 
burg, July 2d, 1863, and was absent, on account of wounds, till 
February 17th, 1864. Was promoted to be First Lieutenant in 
Company B ; date of rank by muster March 27th, 1864 ; by com- 
mission March 1st, 1864. Was appointed Aid-de-Camp to Colo- 
nel Paul Frank, commanding the Brigade, April 24th, 1864, 
and served as such until May 10th, 1864, when he was wounded 
at Po River; and was absent till honorably discharged, on 
account of wounds, August 10th, 1864, by Special Order No. 
265, War Department. 

He was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, the Wil- 
derness, and Po River. 

He received a commission as Captain, dated May 25th, 1864, 
with rank from April 18th, 1864; but was not mustered on 
account of wounds. 



Biographical Sketches. 383 

First Lieutenant Henry M. Lee 
Was born in Clarence, Erie county, New York, in 1838, and was 
by occupation a railroad agent. He enlisted in Company D, 
126th New York Volunteers, August 6th, 1863; was appointed 
Corporal on the organization of the Company ; was promoted to 
he Sergeant, January 1st, 1863 ; was Acting Sergeant-Major from 
July 5th, 1863, till February 29th, 1864, when he was duly pro- 
moted to that office ; he was promoted to be Second Lieutenant 
in Company F; date of rank, by muster, June 9th, 1864; by 
commission, April 16th, 1864; was promoted to be First Lieu- 
tenant in Company E ; date of rank, by muster, September 25th, 
1864; by commission, June 18th, 1864; and was mustered out 
with the Regiment June 3d, 1865. He was detached in charge 
of the 1st Division ammunition train from August 6th, 1864, to 
December 1st, 1864, and was Acting Regimental Quartermaster 
from March 15th, 1865, to May 25th, 1865. He was in command 
of the Regiment for a few days in July, 1864, while Second Lieu- 
tenant, by virtue of being the senior officer of the Regiment 
present for duty. 

He was, while a line or non-commissioned officer, in the follow- 
ing battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow 
Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, the Wilderness, Po River, 
Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, before 
Petersburg and Strawberry Plains. 

First Lieutenant Thomas R. Loundsbury 
Was born in 1S3S ; graduated at Yale college in ls,50, after 
which lie was engaged in writing the biographical sketches for 
Appleton's American Cyclopedia. 

He assisted in recruiting Company C, 120th New York Volun- 
teers, and was commissioned and mustered as First Lieutenant in 
this Company, with rank from August 9th, 1802. He was slightly 
wounded on .Maryland Heights, September 13th, 1802; com- 
manded the Company from September 14th, 1SG2, until January 
4th, JS03; was detached on duty at the draft rendezvous, July 
20th, 1803, and was post Adjutant there until the muster out of 
the Regiment. 



384 IMtii Regiment New York Volunteers. 

He was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, September 13th, 14th 
and 15th, 1862 ; and of Gettysburg, July 2d, 3d and 4th, 1863. 

First Lieutenant John A. McDonald 

Was born at Fayette, Seneca county, New York, in 1840, and 
was by occupation a teacher. 

He enlisted in Company I, 126th Xew York Volunteers, Aug- 
ust 13th, 1862; was appointed Corporal on the organization of 
the Company; was appointed Sergeant, March 1st, 1863 ; was 
promoted to be First Lieutenant in Company I ; date of rank by 
muster, February 5, 1864; by commission, June 3d, 1864; and 
was instantly killed in action, while making a charge before 
Petersburg, Virginia, June 16th, 1864. 

He was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolopoto- 
moy, Cold Harbor and Petersburg. 

First Lieutenant George E. Pritchett 

Was born at TJtica, Xew York, in 1841, and graduated at Hobai-t 
college in 1862, and was an attorney when be entered the 
service. 

He assisted in recruiting Company E, 126th Xew York Volun- 
teers, and was commissioned and mustered First Lieutenant in 
this Company, with rank from August 14th, 1862; was sick in 
hospital at Chicago, Illinois, from October 20th, 1862, till Jan- 
uary 1st, 1863, and was then absent from his Regiment sick until 
February 13th, 1863, when he was honorably discharged the ser- 
vice, on tender of resignation, by Special Order Xo. 5, Depart- 
ment of Washington. 

He was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, September 13th, 14th 
and 15th, 1862. 

First Lieutenant George X. Redfield 

Was born in 1836. He assisted in recruiting Company II, 126th 
Xew York Volunteers, and was commissioned and mustered as 
First Lieutenant in that Company, with rank from August 16th, 
1862. 

He died of typhoid fever at Chicago, Illinois, Xovember 9th, 
is (j 2. 



BionnAPHiCAL Sketches. g85 

lie was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, September 13th, 14th 
ind 15th, 180 2. 

First Lieutenant Jacob Sherman' 
Was born in Geneva, New York, in 1837, and was by occupation 
i tailor. He enlisted in Company E, 126th New York Volun- 
teers, August 7th, 1862; was appointed Sergeant on the organi- 
sation of the Company ; was aj)pointed First Sergeant December 
16th, 1862 ; was promoted to be First Lieutenant in Company E, 
February 13th, 1863; was mortally wounded in action at Gettys- 
burg, July 3d, 1863, while in command of his Company, and died 
in hospital at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 26th, 1863. 
He was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg. 

First Lieutenant George A. Sherman 

Was born in Green, New York, and was a printer by occupation. 
He enlisted in Company A, 126th New York Volunteers, 
August 18th, 1862 ; was appointed Sergeant on the organization 
of the Company ; was promoted to be Second Lieutenant January 
24th, 1863, in Company K ; was promoted to be First Lieutenant 
in Company K, date of rank, by muster, October 22d, 1863 ; by 
commission, July 2d, 1863 ; and was killed in action at Spottsyl- 
vania, May 12th, 1864. 

He was in the following battles: Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, the Wilderness, Po 
River and Spottsylvania. 

First Lieutenant Gideon Skaats 
Was born in 1841. lie assisted in recruiting Company I, 126th 
New York Volunteers, and was commissioned and mustered First 
Lieutenant in the Company, with rank from August 18th, 1802 ; 
and was discharged from the service for physical disability, Octo- 
ber 31st, 18(53, on tender of resignation. 
He was in the battle of Harper's Ferrv. 

First Likitkxant .Martin Y Stanton 
Was born at Prattsbnrgh, New York, in 1830 ; he enlisted in 
Company 0, 120th New York Volunteers, July 16th, 1862; was 
appointed First Sergeant on the organization of the Company ; 
was promoted to be Second Lieutenant in Company G, January 



386 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

6th, 1863 ; was promoted First Lieutenant in Company G, March 
4th, 1863; was appointed Aide-de-Camp on the staff of Colonel 
Paul Frank, commanding the 3d Brigade, 1st Division, 2d Army- 
Corps, June loth, 1864; and was killed in action June 18th, 
1864, while on staff duty before Petersburg, Virginia. 

He was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, Wil- 
derness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolopotomoy, 
Cold Harbor, and Petersburg. 

First Lieutenant Frederic Stewart 

Was born in 1837. He assisted in recruiting Company G, 126th 
New York Volunteers, and was commissioned and mustered 
First Lieutenant in the Company, with rank from August 15th, 

1862, and was discharged from the service on tender of resigna- 
tion, January 6th, 1863, by Special Order No. 3, Adjutant-Gene- 
ral's office, War Department. 

He was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, while with the 126th 
New York Volunteers, and after his discharge he served with the 
20th New York Cavalry, as Captain, from its organization, in 
September 1863, till the close of the war. 

First Lieutenant Samuel Willson 

Was born at Prescott, Canada West, in 1840, and was In- 
occupation, a shoemaker. He enlisted in Company A, 126th 
New York Volunteers, July 19th, 1862 ; was appointed Sergeant 
on the organization of the Comf>any ; was appointed First 
Sergeant, December 18th, 1862; was promoted to be Second 
Lieutenant in Company A, December 29th, 1862 ; was promoted 
to be First Lieutenant in Company A, April 24th, 1863 ; was on 
duty as Acting Adjutant of the Regiment from September 6th, 

1863, till November 27th, 1863; was promoted to be Captain 
39th United States Colored Troops, in April, 1864, and served in 
that Regiment during the campaigns of 1864, and the expedition 
against Fort Fisher, North Carolina ; was discharged February 
11th, 1865. 

He was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn 
Ford, Bristow Station, and Mine Run, while with the 1 26th New 
York Volunteers, and in the battles of the Mine Explosion in 



Biographical Sketches. 387 

front of Petersburg, Fort Fisher, and Sugar Loaf, North Carolina, 
while with the 39th United States Colored Troops. 

He died of consumption at his home in Seneca Falls, New 
York, on the 13th of November, 1869. 

First Lieutenant George L. Yost 

Was born in 1829. He assisted in recruiting Company I, 126th 
New York Volunteers, and was commissioned and mustered 
Second Lieutenant in the Company, with rank from August 18th, 
1862. Was absent, sick, from September 25th, 1863, to Decem- 
ber 18th, 1863; and was discharged for physical disability, on 
tender of resignation, January 2d, 1864, by Special Order No. 2, 
Head-quarters Army of the Potomac. 

Pie was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg. 

Second Lieutenant Charles C. Babbitt 

Was born in Monroe county, N. Y., in 1835, and was by occupa- 
tion a tinsmith. 

He enlisted in Company I, 126th New York Volunteers, 
August 7th, 1862, and was appointed First Sergeant on the 
organization of the Company. Was promoted to be Second 
Lieutenant in Company I, October 21st, 1862; and was dis- 
charged March 23d, 1863, on tender of resignation, by Special 
Order No. 37, Head-quarters Department of Washington. 

He was in the battle of Harper's Ferry. 

Second Lieutenant Uriel D. Bellis 
Was burn in Fayette, Seneca County, New York, in 1836, and 
was a farmer by occupation. He enlisted in Company I, 126th 
New York Volunteers, August 7th, 1862 ; and was appointed Ser- 
geant on the organization of the Company; was promoted First 
Sergeant October 31st, 1862, and Second Lieutenant in the same 
Company March 23d, 1863 ; and was dismissed the service 
December 20th, 1863, by General Order No. 106, Head-quarters 
Army of the Potomac. 

Second Lieutenant Sidney E. Brown 

Was born in Biclilicld, New York, in 1840, and was by occupa- 
tion a farmer, lie enlisted in Company C, 126th New York Vol- 
unteers, August 5th, 1862; and was appointed Sergeant on the 



388 126th Regimext Xew York Yoluxteers. 

organization of the Company; was promoted to be Second Lieu- 
tenant, January 13th, 1863, in Company C ; was severely wounded 
in action at the battle of Gettysburg, July 3d, 1863, and was 
absent till discharged on account of wounds, October 7th, 1863, 
by Special Order No. 448, War Department, Adjutant General's 
Office. 

He was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg. 

Second Lieutenant George D. Carpenter 

Was born in 1826. He assisted in recruiting Company A, 126th 
New York Volunteers, and was commissioned and mustered in 
the Company as Second Lieutenant, with rank from August 4th, 
1862, and was discharged, on tender of resignation, December 
29th, 1862, by Special Order No. 108, Head-quarters Defenses of 
Washington. While with the 126th Regiment he was in the 
battle of Harper's Ferry. 

Lieutenant Carpenter was afterward commissioned First 
Lieutenant in the 179th New York Volunteers, with rank from 
March 22d, 1864; was promoted Captain January 16th, 1865, on 
commission dated January 13th, 1865; and was mustered out 
with his Regiment June 8th, 1865. He afterward received a 
commission as brevet Major, United States Volunteers. 

Second Lieutenant Alfred R. Clapp 

Was the son of Rev. Ralph Clapp, of Phelps, New York, and 
was born in Parma, Monroe county, New York, in 1840. He 
was a jeweler by occupation, and a consistent member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church when he entered the service. He 
assisted in recruiting Company H, 126th New York Volunteers, 
and was commissioned and mustered Second Lieutenant in the 
Company, with rank from August 16th, 1862 ; was in the battle 
of Harper's Ferry, and was killed there September 15th, 1862, 
while in the trenches on Bolivar Heights, by a shell from the 
enemy, carrying away a portion of his head. He was the first 
officer killed in his Regiment, as well as the first of the six 
officers of his Company, that now sleep in soldiers graves. His 
body was buried by his comrades, but in the spring of 1863, his 
remains were removed by his friends to Phelps, New York, where 
he resided, and buried in the cemetery there, in a manner 
becoming a soldier who had died for his country. 



Biographical Sketches. 389 



Second Likutexaxt Pratt Dibble 

Was born in Manchester, 1ST. Y., in 1840, and was by occupation 
a clerk. He enlisted in Company H, 126th Xew York Volun- 
teers, July 28th, 1862, and was appointed Sergeant on the organi- 
zation of the Company. Was' promoted to be First Sergeant 
March 14th, 1863. Was wounded at Gettysburg July 15th, 1863, 
and was absent, on account of wounds, till December 8th, 1863. 
Was promoted to be Second Lieutenant in Company H ; date of 
rank by muster May 18th, 1864; by commission July 3d, 1863. 
Was wounded in action, near Petersburg, Virginia, June 16th, 
1864; and was absent till discharged, on account of wounds, 
September 19th, 1864, by Special Order Xo. 300, War Depart- 
ment, Adjutant-General's Orders. 

He was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Morton's Ford, Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North 
Anna, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, and Petersburg, June 16th, 
1864. 

Lieutenant Dibble never recovered from the injuries to his 
health received in the service, and on the 21st of June, 1866, 
after a protracted illness, he died, at his home, in Manchester, 
Xew York. 

SecOXD LlEUTEXAXT ClIAELES A. GaELIXGIIOUSE 

Was born in Richmond, Ontario county, Xew York, in 1S33, and 
was by occupation a clerk. 

He enlisted July 28th, lse>2, in Company D, 120th Xew York 
Volunteers, as a musician ; Mas appointed principal musician 
May 1st, 1803; was appointed Sergeant-Major, January 20th, 
1^68; was promoted to be Second Lieutenant in Company B, date 
of rank by muster May 1st, ISO,"), by commission, March Otli, 
ISO."). 

lie was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, before Petersburg, 
I'xiydton Road, Southside Railroad, and Farmville, and while 
musician and principal musician he was on Ins appropriate duty 
during all the other engagements of the Pegiment. 



390 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 



Second Lieutenant James N. Griggs 

Was born in Plattkill, N. Y., in 1838, and was a grocer's clerk by 
occupation. He enlisted at Penn Yan, N. Y., as a private in 
Company B, August 4th, 1862; was appointed Sergeant Decem- 
ber 2d, 1862; was detailed clerk in the office of the Division- 
Inspector from April 19th, 1864, till June 8th, 1864, and was 
promoted to be Second Lieutenant June 9th, 1864, and was 
detached in command of the 1st Division 2d Corps ambulance train 
from June 20th, 1864 until June 1st, 1865, and was mustered out 
with the Regiment June 3d, 1865. 

He was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn 
Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, and Petersburg, 
June 16th to 18th, 1864. 

Second Lieutenant Rufus P Holmes 

Was born in Lyons, New York, in 1832, and was by occupation, 
a painter. He enlisted in Company G, 126th New York Volun- 
teers, on the 14th of August, 1862, and was appointed Sergeant 
on the organization of the Company; was promoted to be Second 
Lieutenant in Company B, March 4th, 1863; and was killed in 
action at Gettysburg, July 4th, 1863, while advancing upon the 
skirmish line. He was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg. 

Second Lieutenant Joseph B. Hooper 

Was born in Fayette, Seneca county, New York, in 1831, and 
was a cooper by occupation. He enlisted August 6th, 1862, in 
Company I, 126th New York Volunteers, and was appointed 
Corporal on the organization of the Company ; promoted to be 
Sergeant, March 23d, 1863 ; and to be First Sergeant, in 1863 ; 
was wounded in action at Auburn Ford, October 14th, 1863; 
rejoined the Regiment in January, 1864 ; promoted to be Second 
Lieutenant in Company I, date of rank by muster, June 10th, 
1864, by commission, December 20th, 1863; and discharged 
March 20th, 1865, on tender of resignation, by Special Order No. 
71, Head-quarters 2d Army Corps. 

He was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North 



Biographical Sketches. 391 

Anna, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Deep Bottom, 
Strawberry Plains and Ream's Station. 

Second Lieutenant John H. Hulburt 

Was born in Naples, New York, in 1841, and was by occupation 
a farmer. 

He enlisted in Company K, 126th New York Volunteers, 
August 12th, 1862, and was appointed Corporal on the organiza- 
tion of the Company ; was promoted to be Sergeant, January 
13th, 1863; promoted to be Second Lieutenant in Company K, 
date of rank by muster, May 2d, 1864, by commission, July 3d, 
1863; was severely wounded in action at the Wilderness, May 
6th, 1864, and was absent till discharged on account of wounds, 
November 22d, 1864, by Special Order No. 40, War Department, 
Adjutant-General's office. 

He was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, and 
the Wilderness. 

Second Lieutenant Clinton Pasco 

Was born in Waterloo, Seneca county, New York, in 1833 ; and 
was by occupation a farmer. 

He enlisted August 15th, 1862, in Company G, 126th New York 
Volunteers, as a private ; was appointed Corporal March 4th, 1863 ; 
and was subsequently promoted to be Sergeant and First Ser- 
geant. 

He was promoted to be Second Lieutenant in Company E, 
date of rank by muster, February 8th, 1865, by commission 
January 2d, 1865. 

He was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Morton's 
Ford, the Wilderness, Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, Ream's 
Station, in front of Petersburg, Boydton Plankroad, Sutherland's 
Station, Farmville and Appomattox. 

Second Lieutenant Albert M. Porter 
Assisted in recruiting Company C, 126th New York Volunteers, 
and was commissioned and mustered Second Lieutenant in the 
Company, with rank from August 9th, 1862 ; was at the battle 
of Harper's Ferry; was detached October, 1862, on duty to 



392 126tu Regiment Xew York Volunteers. 

Seneca county, Xew York ; rejoined the Regiment January, 1863 • 
and was discharged on tender of resignation January 13th, 1863, 
by Special Order No. 11, Department of Washington. 

Second Lieutenant Jordan Snook 

Was born in Columbia county, New York, in 1838, and was by 
occupation a farmer. 

He enlisted August 11th, 1862, in Company H, 126th New 
York Volunteers, a private ; was appointed Sergeant, August 1st, 
1864, and First Sergeant, September 1st, 1864 ; was detailed as 
Adjutant's clerk, December 18th, 1863, and served as such till 
October 14th, 1864, when he returned to duty with his Company ; 
was promoted to be Second Lieutenant, January 20th, 1865, and 
assigned to Company C, and was in command of the Company 
until mustered out with the Regiment, June 3d, 1865. 

He was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn 
Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, the Wilderness, 
Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, 
Petersburg, Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, Ream's Station, 
Boydton Plank Road, Farmville and Appomattox. 

Second Lieutenant Charles W Watkins 

Was born in Naples, New York, in 1830, and was by occupation 
a farmer. He enlisted in Company D, 126th New York Volun- 
teers, August 9th, 1862, and was appointed Corporal on the 
organization of the Company ; was promoted to be Sergeant 
March 1st, 1864, and First Sergeant, August 28th, 1864 ; was pro- 
moted to be Second Lieutenant, January 20th, 1865, and assigned 
to Company D, and was in command of the Company until mus- 
tered out with the Regiment, June 3d, 1865. 

He was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, the 
Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolopotomoy, 
Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, 
Ream's Station, Boydton Road, Sutherland's Station, Farmville, 
and Appomattox. 

He received a commission as First Lieutenant, dated May 17th,, 
1865, with rank from February 27th, 1865, but was not mustered, 
on account of orders for muster out of the Regiment. 



Biographical Sketches. 393 

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

Sei:c;eant-Ma.t<>r Albert S. Andrews 
Was born in East Bloomfield, New York, and was by occupation 
a dry goods clerk. lie enlisted as a private August 11th, 1862, 
in Company D ; aged twenty years ; was in action at Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford and Bristow Station. He was 
prostrated by a severe sunstroke on the march from Gettysburg 
to Elk Run in July, 1863, but was taken in an ambulance and 
continued with the Regiment, convalescent, but unable to do 
duty or bear arms during the summer and succeeding autumn. 
At Auburn Ford, however, on the morning of October 14th, 
1863, when the Regiment was ordered out to advance against 
the enemy, Andrews being unarmed was ordered by his Captain 
to remain with the main column, but saying that there would 
soon be a musket for him, he followed his Company, and seizing 
the arms and accoutrements of the first soldier that fell, gallantly 
joined his comrades in the engagement. 

In the afternoon of the same day, at Bristow Station, he went 
into action again ; but while advancing with his Company to the 
railroad cut, under a terrific musketry fire from the enemy, a 
musket ball struck him on the right side of his chin, passed into 
his throat, cutting open the windpipe, and thence through his 
left lung to the skin under the left shoulder blade. He was soon 
after taken to the rear, when the bullet was extracted and he 
removed to the house of a citizen by the name of Geo. M. Porter, 
where he was left in an apparently dying condition to the care of 
the family and the mercy of the enemy, and the army marched 
that night to the heights of Centreville. Andrews remained here, 
cared for by Mrs. Porter and daughter as tenderly as if he had 
been a son and brother, until the 4th of November following, 
when he was removed to the United States general hospital at 
Alexandria, having almost miraculously recovered in a great 
degree from what seemed a fatal wound. He was appointed Cor- 
poral, December 9th, 1H63, to date October 14th, 1863. He 
rejoined his Regiment in February, 1865; was in action before 
Petersburg and at Boydton Plank Road, Sutherland Station, Farm- 
ville and Appomattox ; was promoted to be Sergeant Major, May 
1st, 1865, and was discharged with the Regiment, June 3d, 1865. 



394 126th Regime xt Xew York Voluxteers. 

Sergeant-Major Henry P Cook 

Was born in Starkey, Yates county, New York. He prepared 
for college at Canandaigua Academy, entered Hamilton College 
and became a member of the class of 1863. 

He left his studies in his junior year to respond to his country's 
call, and enlisted in Company B, August 5th, 1862 ; was appointed 
Sergeant in the organization of his Company, and was promoted 
to be Sergeant-Major, December 2d, 1862. 

He was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg, and 
was killed in action at the latter place, while engaged with his 
Regiment in a charge, on the 2d of July, 1863. 

Young Cook was brave, and was loved by all for his social and 
amiable qualities, his scholarly tastes and acquirements, and his 
moral and Christian virtues. 

First Lieutenant John Stevenson 
Was born in Seneca Falls, New York, and was a moulder by 
occupation. He enlisted August 2d, 1862, in Company G, aged 
twenty-eight years, and was appointed Quartermaster-Sergeant 
from date of enlistment. He was detached on duty at the draft 
depot at Elmira, New York, and while on such duty was com- 
missioned and mustered First Lieutenant in Battery D, 3d New 
York Light Artillery, March 8th, 1864, and he served with that 
Battery till mustered out with his Battery, July 5th, 1865. 

Quartermaster-Sergeant John Davis 

Was born in Junius, New York, and was a carpenter by occupa- 
tion. He enlisted in Company I, August 13th, 1862, aged twenty- 
seven years, and was detailed on duty with the Regimental Quar- 
termaster-Sergeant, March 1st, 1864, and served in that capacity 
until discharged with the Regiment, June 3d, 1865. 

Commissary-Sergeant Charles R. Lisk 
Was born in Waterloo, New York. He enlisted in Company G, 
July 12th, 1862, aged twenty-eight years, and was appointed 
Commissary-Sergeant, to date from enlistment, and held the posi- 
tion during the entire term of service of the Regiment, and was 
discharged June 3d, 1865. He performed his duty so well that 



Biographical Sketches. 395 

no one in the Regiment could think of losing him by promotion, 
and so he remained a faithful Commissary-Sergeant, always secur- 
ing for the Regiment the best of rations, abundantly and promptly. 
No purveyor could have done better. 

It is due to Charles R. Lisk to insert a tribute to his worth, 
rendered him by an officer at a reunion of the Regiment held in 
1868: "I must say a word for generous, open handed, whole 
souled, accurate Charlie, to whom we of the Regiment, officers 
and privates, are so much indebted ; faithful as time, in labors 
more abundant, in fidelity untiring, he earned and ought to have 
receive the shoulder-strap double barred. We can never forget 
the genial and companionable Charles R. Lisk of the Quarter- 
master's Department." 

Surgeon Henry T. Antis 

Was born in Canandaigua, New York, in 1837. He entered 
Williams College in 1856, and graduated in 1860. Studied 
medicine with Dr. Hays at Canandaigua, and at the University 
of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, and graduated at Long Island Medi- 
cal College. He enlisted August 19th, 1862, in Company K, 
aged twenty-five years, and was appointed Hospital Steward on 
the day of his enlistment. Served as such till November 20th, 
1802, when, having passed an examination before the Medical 
Board of the State of Illinois, he was discharged from the Regi- 
ment and appointed Assistant Surgeon of the 33d Illinois Infan- 
try, and was promoted Surgeon of the 47th Illinois Infantry, May 
14th, 1865, and mustered out of the service with the Regiment 
on the 21st day of January, 1866. 

Surgeon Antis, while with the 33d Illinois, served through the 
winter campaign in Missouri in 1862, and through the entire 
Vicksburg campaign, and in the campaign in Western Louisiana 
in 1803 ; was detached on duty in charge of a Battalion of Artil- 
lery at New Orleans dining the winter of 1863 and 1864, and 
was in the Red River expedition under Banks in 1804, and dur- 
ing the remainder of the year 1804 in the Department of the 
Gulf; was in the expedition under General Canby at the capture 
of Spanish Fort, Fort Blakely and Mobile in 1805, and was on 
duty with the 47th Illinois from the time of his assignment to 
that Reuriinent. 



396 126th Regiment Xew York Volunteers. 

Hospital Steward George W Becker 

Was born in Red Creek, New York, and was a druggist by 
occupation. He enlisted August 11th, 1862, in Company F, aged 
twenty-eight years, and was appointed Hospital Steward, Novem- 
ber 20th, 1862, and served in that capacity until mustered out 
with the Regiment, June 3d, 1865, and subsequently died of 
consumption. 

Principal Musician Lyman E. Jacobs 
Was born in Varrick, Xew York, and was a farmer by occupation. 
He enlisted in Company C, August 6th, 1862, aged twenty-four 
years, and was detailed as Musician, April 12th, 1863, and served 
as such until January 20th, 1865, when he was appointed 
Principal Musician, and served in that capacity till mustered out 
with the Regiment, June 3d, 1865. 

He was on duty in his appropriate place during all the battles 
in which his Regiment was engaged. 



Biographical Sketches. 39' 



COMPANY A. 



Company A was recruited entirely in Yates county, through 
the exertions of its line officers, aided by the various local war 
committees of the county. War meetings were held in nearly all 
parts of the county, and the Company was recruited rapidly, it 
being the first to rendezvous at Camp Swift. A few of the men 
were enlisted under an earlier call, and were in camp at Elmira, 
but were transferred to the Company upon its arrival at Geneva. 
The Company organization bears date August 4th, 1862. The 
following were the original line officers of the Company : 

Truman X. Burrill, Captain. 

Samuel A. B arras, First Lieutenant. 

George D. Carpenter, Second Lieutenant. 

NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS. 

Morris Beowx, Jr. See Captain Morris Brown, Jr., page 366. 

Samuel Wilson. See First Lieutenant Samuel Wilson, 

page 386. 

Charles Forshay enlisted July 29th, 1862, and was appointed 
Sergeant ; he was promoted to First Sergeant, December 29th, 
1862, and commissioned Second Lieutenant, April 24th, 1862, but 
failing to muster until after the battle of Gettysburg, was 
returned to the Company as Sergeant, by order of Court-Martial, 
for misconduct before the enemy in that action, with an order 
prohibiting his muster ; he was reduced to the ranks soon after the 
battle of Bristow Station, and absent from the Regiment from 
March 22d, 1864, to May 1805, and was discharged from the ser- 
vice at the close of the Avar. 

Wallace Betts enlisted July 29th, 1862, aged twenty-three 
years, and was appointed Sergeant ; he participated in the battle 
of Harper's Ferry, and was discharged for disability at Camp 
Douglas, Chicago, 111., November 4th, 1802. 

O. M. Paimus enlisted July 28th, 1802, aged twenty-three years, 
and was appointed Sergeant December 29th, 1802 ; he was sent 



398 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

to General Hospital, sick, March 24th, 1863, and reduced to the 
ranks June 1st, 1863 ; he participated in action at Harper's 
Ferry, and was discharged for disability at Alexandria, Va., Sep- 
tember 19th, 1863. 

Daniel Kelly enlisted July 29th, 1862, aged twenty-seven 
years ; he participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, and was 
appointed Sergeant November 7th, 1862; he was discharged 
from the service February 5th, 1863, on account of a wound 
received in the hand by the accidental discharge of a musket. 

Smith Fuller was born in Westchester county, New York ; he 
enlisted July 18th, 1862, was appointed Sergeant, December 13th, 
1862; and promoted to be First Sergeant, December 30th, 1863 ; 
he participated in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Get- 
tysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, 
the Wilderness, Po River and Spottsylvania, and was mortally 
wounded in action at the latter place, May 12th, 1864, and con- 
veyed to Fredericksburg, Va., where he died of his wounds, May 
15th, 1864. 



*> 



Barnard Gelder was born in Seneca, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and was appointed Corporal ; he was in action 
at Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg, and was absent sick, from 
July 5th to December 11th, 1863, when he was discharged for 
physical disability 

Charles Stebbins was born at Geneva, New York, and was a 
butcher by occupation; he enlisted July 29th, 1862, and was 
appointed Corporal ; he was on duty as provost guard in General 
Abercrombie's Division from June 5th to June 25th, 1863, when he 
was sent to general hospital, sick ; he participated in the battle 
of Harper's Ferry, and was transferred to the Invalid Corps, 
September 1st, 1863, and was subsequently discharged from the 
service. 

David H. Gopf was born in Geneva, New York; he enlisted 
July 28th, 1862, aged twenty-nine years, and was appointed Ser- 
geant December 29th, 1862 ; he participated in the battles of 
Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg ; was mortally wounded in action 



Biographical Sketches. 399 

at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863, and died from wounds 
in the field hospital at that place, July 4th, 1863. 

Smith Stebbins was born in Geneva, New York, and was by 
occupation a shoemaker; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged 
twenty-six years, and was appointed Sergeant, February 5th, 1862 ; 
he was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg, and was 
severely wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 
1863; he was discharged on account of wounds, at Elmira, New 
York, February 12th, 1864. 

Lot W Rogers was born in Rushville, Xew York, and Avas a 
carpenter by occupation; he enlisted July 23d, 1862, and was 
subsequently appointed Corporal ; he participated in the battle 
of Harper's Ferry, and was discharged for disability, October 
5th, 1862. 

Charles Norcott was born in Yates county. New York, and 
by occupation, Avas a tinsmith; he enlisted July 28th, 1862; 
participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, and was appointed 
Corporal ; he Avas detached as provost guard at Head-quarters 
Second Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and served in that capacity 
until the close of the Avar, when he Avas discharged with the 
Regiment. 

Musicians. 

William Beebe was born in Albany, NeAV York, and Avas a 
shoemaker by occupation ; he enlisted as musician, July 29th, 
1862, aged thirty-four years, and served with the Regiment in all 
the campaigns until the close of the Avar, acting a portion of the 
time as Principal Musician ; he performed valuable services as an 
attendant in the division hospital, during the battles of 1864, and 
was discharged with the Regiment. 

J.vmks McAllister was born in Dundee, New York; lie 
enlisted July 20th, 1802 ; was in action at Harper's Ferry ; and 
was discharged for disability, at Chicago, Illinois, December 5th, 

1802. 

Privatks. 

Richard M. Allen was horn in Middlesex, Ncav York, and 
avus a farmer by occupation ; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged 



400 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

thirty-one years ; he was absent, sick in hospital, from October 
9th, 1863, to September 4th, 1864 ; and appointed Sergeant 
November 1st, 1864, upon recommendation of Colonel MeDou- 
gal, commanding the Brigade, for soldierly conduct while on 
duty at Brigade Head-quarters ; he participated in the battles 
of Harper's Ferry, Gettyburg and Sutherland's Station ; he was 
shot through the lungs by a Minnie ball while in action with the 
Regiment at Sutherland's Station, Virginia, April 2d, 1865, and 
was discharged at the close of the war. 

Warren Allen was born in Connecticut, and enlisted 
August 1st, 1862, aged forty years; he was on detached duty 
until January 5th, 1865 ; he participated in action at Harper's 
Ferry, at the capture of Petersburg, Sutherland's Station, Farm- 
ville and the surrender of Lee, at Appomattox Court-house ; 
and was discharged with the Regiment at the close of the war. 

William Axtill was born in England, and enlisted August 7th, 
1862, aged forty years ; he was in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Gettysburg, and was wounded and missing in action at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863. 

Oliver Baker was born in Penn Yan, New York, and 
enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged twenty-two years; he was in 
action at Harper's Ferry, and deserted at Frederick, Maryland, 
September 17th, 1862. 

William Baker was born in Bradford, New York; he 
enlisted July 29th, 1862, aged twenty-five years ; and was in the 
battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, and Morton's Ford ; he 
was on detached duty until October, 1863, and was absent 
sick in hospital from October 19th, 1863 to February 5th, 1864 ; 
he was detached as Provost Guard at Head-quarters, 2d Army 
Corps, April 4th, 1864, and serving in that capacity until the 
close of the war, was discharged with the Regiment. 

Levi P. Brizee was born in Penn Yan, New York ; he 
enlisted August 1st, 1862, aged nineteen years ; he was in 
action at Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg; and was severely 
wounded at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1S63 ; he 
rejoined the Company October 9th, 1864, and participated in all 



Biographical Sketches. 401 

the battles until the close of the war, when he was discharged 
with the Regiment. 

George A. Byixgtox was born in Starkey, New York ; he 
enlisted August 1st, 1862; aged thirty years; and participated 
in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Aidmrn Ford, 
Bristow Station, Mine Run, and Morton's Ford; he was 
detached in provost guard at head-quarters, 2d Army Corps, 
April 4th, 1864, and was discharged with the Regiment. 

James Buexs was born in Utica, New York ; he enlisted 
July 28th, 1862; aged twenty-two years; and participated in the 
battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg ; he was detached in 
provost guard at head-quarters, 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, 
and served until the close of the war, when he was discharged 
with the Regiment. 

Daxiel J. Beyea was born in Yates county, New York, and 
enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged twenty-four years; by occupa- 
tion he was a farmer ; he was in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Auburn Ford, and was taken prisoner in action at Auburn 
Ford, Yirginia, October 14th, 1863. 

Hexhy Bilsox was born in Seneca, New York, and enlisted 
August '/th, 1862, aged thirty-five years; he was in action at 
Harper's Ferry, and deserted at Chicago, Illinois, October 19th, 

1862. 

Geokge Burcii was born in Yates county, New York ; he 
enlisted July 26th, 1862, aged thirty-five years, and was in the 
battles of Harper's Ferry, the Wilderness, Po River and Peters- 
burg ; he was detached as teamster in 1863, and joined the 
Regiment before the opening of the campaign in 1864 ; he was 
wounded in action at Po River, May loth, 1864, rejoining the 
Regiment August 26th, 1864; he was absent sick from March 
31st, 1S6"), and discharged from the service at the close of the 
war. 

\. 11. ( hisom was born in Yates county, New York, and by 
profession was a physician; he enlisted July 29th, 1862, aged 
forty-two years, ami was in action at Harper's Ferry; lie deserted 
at Chicago, Illinois, Oetohcr l">th, 1862, but returned to the Regi 



402 126th Regiment New Yoek Volunteers. 

ment, under the proclamation of the President, April 4th, 1863, 
and was restored to duty ; he was detailed as nurse in the Coi^s 
hospital at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863 ; deserted 
soon after, and did not again join the Regiment. 

John Cummixgs Avas born in Onondaga county, New York, 
and by occupation was a laborer; he enlisted July 29th, 1862, 
aged eighteen years ; was in action with the Regiment at Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg, and was absent sick from September 12th, 
1863, to December 9th, 1863 ; he was detailed Avith provost guard 
at head-quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and served in 
that capacity until the close of the war, Avhen he was discharged 
with the Regiment. 

John Coxklix was born in Jerusalem, Xew York, and enlisted 
August 7th, 1862, aged tAventy-seven years; he was in action at 
Harper's Ferry, and deserted at Chicago, Illinois, October 19th, 

3 862. 

Levi Cole Avas born in Yates county, Xew York, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged twenty- 
one years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg and the Wilderness ; he was wounded in action at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863 ; rejoining the Regi- 
ment December 18th, 1863; he received a wound in action, at 
the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864, resulting in the loss 
of an arm ; and was discharged on account of wounds, February 
17th, 1865. 

Eben B. Daxes was born in Branchport, New York, and by 
occupation, Avas a laborer; he enlisted July 28th, 1862; aged 
twenty-two years ; he participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry ; and died of disease in hospital near Union Mills, Virginia, 
March 27th, 1863. 

William H. Dubois was born in Germany ; he enlisted July 
24th, 1862, aged tAventy-tAvo years and deserted at Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 8th, 1862. 

A. R. Feagles Avas born in Ontario county, NeAV York, and 
enlisted July 18th, 1862, aged thirty-three years; he was in 
action at Harper's Ferry, and deserted at Chicago, Illinois, Nov- 
ember 21st, 1862. 



lllOHKAPHICAL £< KETCHES. 403 

Daniel \Y Finch was born in Milo, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a farmer ; he enlisted August 1st, 1862, aged twenty- 
nine years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor and Peters- 
burg ; he was wounded and taken prisoner at Auburn Ford, 
Virginia, October 14th, 18(33 ; rejoined the Regiment, May 27th, 
1864, and was wounded in action near Petersburg, Virginia, June 
16th, 1864 ; he was appointed Corporal, November 4th, 1862, 
and promoted to Sergeant, May 1st, 1863 ; and was discharged 
on account of wounds near the close of the war. 

Jonx H. Frost was born in Westchester, New York, and by 
occupation was a blacksmith ; he enlisted July 26th, 1862, aged 
nineteen years ; he was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettys- 
burg, Morton's Ford, the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, 
North Anna River, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor and Petersburg ; 
he was wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 
J 863, and rejoined the Regiment December 24th, 1863; he was 
wounded while on picket in front of Petersburg, Virginia, Octo- 
ber 29th, 1864, and was subsequently discharged from the service 
on account of wounds. 

Johx H. Gai;riso>* was born in Rochester, New York, and by 
occupation was a cartman ; he enlisted at the age of twenty-two 
vears, August 11th, 1862, and was in action at Harper's Ferry 
and the Wilderness ; he was detached as Brigade teamster in 
1863, and subsequently served in the ambulance corps ; he was 
wounded in action at the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864, and returned 
to the Regiment November 9th, 1864 ; he was sent to general 
hospital sick March 29th, i860, did not afterward join the Pegi- 
ment, and was discharged from the service at the close of the 
war. 

1>aun.u:i> F Celdeu was born in Seneca, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 11th, 18(52, aged 
twenty-one years; lie participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry, Gett vsburg. Auburn Ford and liristow Station; and was 
killed in action at Bristow Station, Alrginia, October 14th, 1863. 

William IIainki: was horn in Columbia county, New York, 
and by occupation was a boatman ; lie enlisted August 2d, 1862, 



404 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

aged thirty-eight years ; he participated in the battles of Har- 
per's Ferry, and deserted at Chicago, Illinois, October 19th, 1862 ; 
but returned to the Regiment October 5th, 1863, and served faith- 
fully until the close of the war, participating in the following 
battles : the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna, 
Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Deep Bottom, Strawberry 
Plains, Ream's Station, Capture of Petersburg, Sutherland's Sta- 
tion, Farmville, and Surrender of Lee at Appomattox Court- 
house ; he was discharged with the Regiment. 

F A. Hafford Avas born in Ellington, Ncav York, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged twenty- 
eight years ; was in action at the battle of Haider's Ferry, Vir- 
ginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and died of disease in 
camp, near Union Mills, Virginia, January 10th, 1863. 

John Harris was born in Italy, Xew York, and by occupation 
was a farmer; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged twenty-one 
years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg ; he Avas detached as provost guard at Head-quarters 
2d Army Coi^s, April 4th, 1864, and served in that capacity until 
the close of the war, when he Avas discharged Avith the Regiment. 

James Hendersox Avas born in Milo, New York, and by occu- 
pation Avas a farmer; he enlisted July 28, 1862, aged twenty- 
seven years ; Avas appointed Corporal, December 15th, 1862, and 
promoted to Sergeant, June 1st, 1863; he participated in the 
battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Morton's Ford, the Wil- 
derness, Po River, and Spottsyhania ; he was absent sick from 
August 19th, 1863, to January 8th, 1864 ; he was wounded 
in action at Spottsylvania, Virginia, May 12th, 1864, resulting in 
the loss of a leg, and was subsequently discharged from the service 
on account of wounds received in action. 

Abner Herries was born in Yates county, New York, and 
enlisted June 26th, 1862, aged thirty-seven years ; he was in 
action at Harper's Ferry, and deserted at Chicago, Illinois, 
November 21st, 1862. 

William Herris was born at Branchport, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer ; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged twenty- 
one years ; he participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Vir- 



Biographical Sketches. 405 

ginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and died of disease in 
general hospital, at Baltimore, Maryland, April 25th, I860. 

James R. IIibrard was born in Branchpoint, New York, and 
by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted July 29th, 1862, aged 
twenty-two years ; participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; and died of dis- 
ease at the regimental hospital in camp near Centreville, Virginia, 
April 14th, 1863. 

William P. House was born in Yates county, New York, and 
was a shoemaker by occupation ; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, 
aged forty-four years, and was detailed as nurse in the regimental 
hospital, October 12th, 1862 ; he served in that capacity until 
the close of the war, accompanying the army in all its campaigns 
and was discharged with the Regiment. 

Neil Kelly was born in Glasgow, Scotland, and was by 
occupation, a painter; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged 
twenty-three years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run 
and Morton's Ford ; he Mas detached in the provost guard at 
Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and served in 
that capacity until the close of the war, when he was discharged 
with the Regiment. 

Russell A. Lincoln was born in Dundee, New York, and 
enlisted August 1st, 1862, aged twenty-seven years; he was in 
action at the battle of Harper's Ferry, and was discharged on 
account of physical (Usability, December 13th, 1802. 

Orson R. Linklettki: was born in Avoca, New York, and by 
occupation, was a carpenter; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged 
twenty-four years; he was in action at the battles of Harper's 
Ferry, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, and Morton's 
Fold, and was absent sick from March 25th, to July 26th, 1863; 
he was detached with the provost guard at Head-quarters 2d 
Army Corps, April 4th, is 6 4, and served in that capacity with 
the army until the close of the war, when he was discharged 
with the Regiment. 

David Little was born in Ovid, New York, and enlisted 



406 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

August 1st, 1862, aged twenty-five years ; he was in the battle 
of Harper's Ferry, and deserted September 26th, 1862. 

John C. Mace was born in Jerusalem, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 1st, 1862, aged 
twenty-eight years ; he participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg, and was absent, sick, from July 19th, 1863, 
to February 8th, 1864 ; he was detached with the provost guard at 
Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and served in 
that capacity until the close of the war, when he was discharged 
with the Regiment. 

Patrick Manly was born in Geneva, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a cooper; he enlisted August 1st, 1862, aged eighteen 
years, and deserted September 17th, 1862 ; but returned Novem- 
ber 11th, 1863, and was restored to duty, serving faithfully with 
the Regiment until the close of the war ; he participated in the 
following battles : Harper's Ferry, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, the 
Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna River, Tolopo- 
tomoy, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, 
Ream's Station, and Boydton Road ; he was appointed Corpo- 
ral, January 1st, 1865 ; and was severely wounded in action at 
Boydton Road, Virginia, March 31st, 1865 ; he was discharged 
at Washington, District of Columbia, June 12th, 1865. 

John D. Maynard was born inPenn Yan, New York, and was 
a cooper by occupation; he enlisted July 28th, 1862; he was 
detached on duty in the Quartermaster's department from Octo- 
ber 5th, 1862, to July 22d, 1864; he participated in the follow- 
ing battles: Harper's Ferry, Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, 
Hatcher's Run, Sutherland's Station, Farmville, and Appomattox 
Court-house, and was discharged with the Regiment. 

George W McKnight was born in Seneca, New York, and 
enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged thirty-two years; he was in 
action at the battle of Harper's Ferry, and was discharged for 
physical disability at Chicago, Illinois, February 7th, 1863. 

Arthur W Middleton was born in Branchport, New York, 
and by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted July 30th, 1862, 
aged twenty-one years; he participated in the battles of Har- 
per's Ferry, Gettysburg and Auburn Ford, and was wounded in 



Biographical Sketches. 407 

iction at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 186-3 ; he was 
igain wounded and taken prisoner in action at Auburn Ford, 
Virginia, October 14th, 1863 ; subsequently he was exchanged 
md transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, March 15th, 1865, 
ind discharged from the service at the close of the war. 

George Millis was born in Yates county, New York, and 
i^as a painter by occuj)ation ; he enlisted June 25th, 1862, aged 
jighteen years ; he was in action in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg and Auburn Ford ; was taken prisoner at 
Auburn Ford, Virginia, October 14th, 1863, and rejoined the 
Regiment May 27th, 1864 ; he was wounded in the foot while 
>n picket at Cold Harbor, Virginia, June 3d, 1864, and was 
ibsent until discharged at the close of the war. 

Charles E. Moore was born in Penn Yan, New York, and by 
)ccupation was a boatman; he enlisted July 29th, 1862, aged 
;wenty-seven years ; he was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and was discharged on 
iccount of disability at Alexandria, Virginia, May 21st, 1863. 

Hesey O. Moore was born at Bluff Point, Yates county, New 
¥"ork, and by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 1st, 
L862, aged twenty-four years, and participated in the battles of 
Elarper's Ferry and Gettysburg ; he was detached with the pro- 
vost guard at Head-quarters, 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1H64, 
md served in that capacity until the close of the war; he was 
ippointed Corporal, January 1st, 1865, and was discharged with 
"he Regiment. 

Alexaxpki; Mosiiier was born in Phelps, New York, and by 
x'cupation was a farmer; he enlisted August sth, 1802, aged 
wenty-two years ; he participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg and Morton's Ford ; he Mas wounded in action 
it Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1803 ; and was absent on 
iccount of wounds until January 5th, 1804; he was detached 
ivith the provost guard at Head-quarters. 2d Army Corps, April 
4-t li, 1S04; served in that capacity during the war, and was dis- 
charged with the Regiment at its (dose. 

Lewis Mikihiy was born in Steuben county, New York, and 
( >y occupation was a farmer; lie enlisted July 20th, 1^02, aged 



408 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

twenty years ; he was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and transferred to Invalid 
Corps, September 30th, 1863. 

Charles M. Nicholson was born in Hornellsville, N Y., and 
by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted July 23d, 1862, aged 
twenty-two years; he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, and Bristow Station ; being mortally 
wounded in action at Bristow Station, Virginia, October 14th, 1863, 
he was placed in an ambulance for Alexandria, and has not since 
been heard from ; probably he died en route. 

John J.Oakly was born in Copake, Columbia county, New York, 
and enlisted July 23d, 1862 ; he participated in the battle of Har- 
per's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and was 
discharged for disability at Chicago, Illinois, February 27th, 1863 ; 
he re-enlisted in the 15th New York Cavalry, August 3d, 1863, and 
served under Major-General Sheridan in the Valley of the Shen- 
andoah in 1864, and with the Army of the Potomac in the cam- 
paign of 1865 ; he was discharged at Louisville, Kentucky, August 
9th, 1865. 

Alfred C. Olds was born in Pultney, New York, and enlisted 
July 29th, 1862, aged twenty-three years ; he was in the battles 
of Harper's Ferry and the Wilderness, and was detached in the 
Pioneer Corps from December 12th, 1862, to March, 1864 ; he 
was wounded in action at the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th,. 
1864. 

David H. Parris was born in Jerusalem, New York, and by 
occupation was a mechanic; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged 
twenty-six years ; he participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg ; was detached on duty at Elmira, New 
York, July 27th, 1863, and subsequently discharged from the 
service. 

Peter F. Parris was born in Wheeler, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged 
twenty -five years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg and the Wilderness ; he was wounded in action in 
the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864, but rejoined the 
Regiment September 4th, 1864, and remained on duty in the 



Biographical, Sketches. 409 

field until the close of the war, participating in the battles and 
skirmishes of the campaign of 1865, and was discharged with the 
Regiment. 

John W Pauker was born in Branchpoint, New York, and 
was a farmer by occupation ; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged 
twenty-seven years ; he was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg ; was wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
July 2d, 1863, and rejoined the Regiment, January 8th, 1864 ; he 
was detached in the provost guard at Head-quarters, 2d 
Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and served in that capacity until 
the close of the war, when he was discharged with the Regiment. 

Harlow F. Parsons was born in Italy, Yates county, New 
York, and by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 1st, 
1S62, aged nineteen years, and participated in the battles of Har- 
per's Ferry and Gettysburg ; he died of typhoid fever in general 
hospital at Washington, District Columbia, September 21st, 1863. 

Lewis T. Partridge was born in Ontario county, New York, 
and by occupation was a farmer ; he enlisted July 29th, 1862, aged 
nineteen years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, and Mor- 
ton's Ford ; he was detached in the provost guard at Head- 
quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1804, and served in that 
capacity with the army until the close of the war, when he was 
discharged with the Regiment. 

Fu.vxcis E. Poor- Mas born in Canandaigua, New York, and 
by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted July 20th, 1802, aged 
twenty years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Gettysburg; he was wounded in action at Gettysburg, Penn- 
sylvania, July 3d, 1S63 ; rejoined the Regiment in August, 1863, 
and was in the battles of Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine 
Run, Morion's Ford, and the Wilderness; he was wounded in 
action in the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1804 ; was trans- 
ferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, January 10th, 1N6">, and 
discharged from the service at the close of the war. 

Ko incur II. I'ooi, was born in Canandaigua, New York, and was 
a farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 11th, 1802, aged 
twenty-four years; he participated in the battles of Harper's 



410 126th Regime xt New York Volunteers. 

Ferry and Gettysburg, and was killed in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863. 

William J. Pool was born in Canandaigua, Xew York, and In- 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted July 25th, 1862, aged 
twenty-two ; he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Auburn Ford, and Mas taken prisoner in action at Auburn 
Ford, Virginia, October 14th, 1863 ; he returned to the Regiment 
and was transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, January 10th, 
1865, and was discharged from the service at the close of the war. 

Charles H. Powers was born in Jerusalem, Xew York, and 
was by occupation a laborer ; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged 
twenty-seven years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he was detached in the 
Brigade band from February 18th to June 25th, 1863, and served 
in Regimental Drum Corps from that date to August 24th, 1863 ; 
he rejoined the Brigade band August 24th, 1863, and remained 
on duty in that capacity until the close of the war ; he wa> 
slightly wounded in action at Mine Run, Virginia, November 
2Hh, 1863, and was discharged with the Regiment. 

Calvin L. Reed was born in Italy, Yates county, Xew York, 
and by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 1st, 1862, aged 
twenty-eight years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, and 
Morton's Ford ; he was detached with provost guard at Head- 
quarters, 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 18G4, and served in that 
capacity until the close of the war, when he was discharged with 
the Regiment. 

Sidney D. Rice was horn in Penn Yan, Xew York, and enlisted 
August 6th, 1862, aged eighteen years ; he was in the battle of 
Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and J 5th, 1862, 
and was detailed and on duty as Orderly at Brigade Head-quar- 
ters, from March 28th to July 1st, 1863, when lie was transferred 
in the same capacity to Division Head-quarters, whore he served 
until March 25th, 1864 ; he was detached with (lie provost guard 
at Head-quarters, 2d Army Corps, April tth, 18C>4, and detailed 
as clerk in the provost marshal's office, where he was ondutv 
until the close of the war, when he was discharged with the 
Rotnnient. 



Biographical Sketches. 411 

William Robinsox was born in Prattsburgh, New York, and 
enlisted July li-ith, 1862, aged thirty-five years ; he deserted at 
Geneva, Xew York, August 25th, 1862. 

James Ryan was born in Ireland; he enlisted August 1st, 1862, 
aged twenty-six years, and deserted at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 8th, 1862 ; he returned to the Regiment, October 2d, 
1863, and was sentenced by general court-martial to loss of all 
pay to June 30th, 1864 ; he was sent to general hospital sick, 
February 10th, 1864, and was discharged from the service at the 
close of the Avar. 

Alisiox C. Sheppaed was born at Bluff Point, Xew York, and 
was a farmer by occupation ; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and was appointed Corporal, May 1st, 1863 ; 
he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Morton's Ford and the Wilderness ; he was absent, sick, from 
October 3d to December, 1863, and was wounded in action at 
the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864 ; he rejoined the 
Regiment, August 26th, 1864, and was detailed as color guard, 
serving in that capacity in all the battles until the close of the 
war, when he was discharged with the Regiment. 

Cykus Sherwood was born at Bluff Point, New York, and by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 2d, 1862, aged twenty- 
five years ; he participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Vir- 
ginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1802 ; was detailed as 
Brigade teamster, February 9th, 1K63, and served in that capa- 
city with the army until the close of the war, when he was dis- 
charged with the Regiment. 

William II. Shoemaker was born in Bradford, New York, 
and enlisted July 31st, lst'>2, aged eighteen years ; he participated 
in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Auburn Ford; and was 
taken prisoner in action at Auburn Ford, Virginia, October 14th, 
1st;:;. 

Si'EM ek Si.ixtiEitLAN i> wasboiTi in Yates county, New York, 
and was a laborer by occupation ; lie enlisted July 31st, 1K62, aged 
twenty-two years ; lie participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September l:ith, 14th and 15th, 1S02, and was dis- 
charged for disability at Centerville, Virginia, March 31st, LS63. 



412 126th Regiment Xew York Volunteers. 

Charles W Steeling was born in Yates county, Xew York, 
and by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted July 25th, 1862, 
aged twenty years ; he participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg, being slightly wounded in the shoulder at 
the latter place, July 2d, 1863 ; he was absent from the Regiment 
until April 8th, 1864 ; but was with it in the campaign of 1864, 
until July 25th, when he was sent to general hospital, sick; he 
did not afterward rejoin the Regiment, and was discharged from 
the service at the close of the war. 

George T. Stevens was born in Penn Yan, Xew York, and 
enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged twenty-nine years; he was in 
the battle at Harper's Ferry, and deserted at Chicago, Illinois, 
October 19th, 1862. 

William W Steowbridge was born in Potter, Yates county, 
New York, and by occupation was a farmer ; he enlisted July 
29th, 1862, aged nineteen years, and was appointed Corporal, 
January 5th, 1863; he participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg and Auburn Ford ; he was severely wounded 
in the thigh and shoulder, at Auburn Ford, Virginia, October 
14th, 1863 ; he rejoined the Regiment, September 4th, 1864, and 
was killed in action near Petersburg, Virginia, March 25th, 1865. 

Charles P, Strong was born in Pultney, Xew York ; he 
enlisted July 31st, 1862, aged twenty-one years; he was in the 
battle of Harper's Ferry, and discharged on account of physical 
disability, at Chicago, Illinois, January 14th, 1863. 

David D. Taylor was born in Penn Yan, Xew York, and was 
by occupation a shoemaker; lie enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged 
twenty-nine years, and participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; he was detached in 
the Brigade Ambulance Corps, January 10th, 1863, and remained 
on duty in that capacity until the close of the war, accompanying 
the army in its campaigns, and was discharged with the Regiment. 

David E. Taylor was born in England, and by occupation 
was a harness-maker; he enlisted August 11th, 1863, aged thirty- 
three years; he participated in the battle of Harper's Ferrv; was 
appointed Corporal, November 4th, 1862, and detailed as cook in 
the Brigade hospital, January 10th, 1863 ; he returned to the Regi- 



Biographical Sketches. 413 

ment, and was wounded in action at Auburn Ford, Virginia, 
October 14th, 1863; subsequently he was transferred to the 
Veteran Reserve Corps, and was discharged from the service at 
the close of the war. 

James Taylor was born in Bellona, New York, and was by occu- 
pation a laborer; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged twenty-one 
years ; he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Get- 
tysburg, and was absent sick from November 25th, 1863, to Feb- 
ruary 24th, 1864; he was sent to general hospital, sick, March 
20th, 1864, and rejoined the Regiment August 26th, 1864; he 
was detailed as Brigade teamster, October 17th, 1864, and served 
as such until the close of the war, when he was discharged with 
the Regiment. 

David A. Teaks was born in Auburn, New York, and enlisted 
July 30th, 1862, aged twenty-eight years; he participated in the 
battle of Harper's Ferry, and was discharged for disability at 
Chicago, Illinois, in January, 1863. 

Thomas Tobin was born in Ireland ; was by occupation a 
farmer, and enlisted June 30th, 1862, aged eighteen years; he 
participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, and 
Auburn Ford, and was killed in action at Auburn Ford, Vir- 
ginia, October 14th, 1863. 

Isaac Traverse was born in Onondaga county, New York, 
and by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, 
aged twenty-one years ; he was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and died at 
Chicago, Illinois, November, 1863. 

SrKxrKi: Tukxki: was born in New York, and was by occupa- 
pat ■ion a farmer ; he enlisted July 25tli, IS62, aged twenty-five 
years; he deserted at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September sth, 
1S62, and died at Alexandria, Virginia, September, 186:;, while 
on his way to rejoin the Uegiment. 

Ai.kxa.ndek Ti KNEit was born in Jerusalem, New York, and 
was by occupation a laborer; he enlisted July 24th, IS62, aged 
twenty-two years; lie .part icipated in the battle of Harper's Ferry,, 
and died of disease at that place, September 24th, 1S62. 



414 120tii Rehimext x'ew York Volvxteees. 

Piiineas Tyler was born in Pultny, \o\v York, and by occu- 
pation was a farmer; lie enlisted August 1st, 1862, aged twenty- 
eight years; was appointed Corporal, May 1st, 1863, and 
promoted to Sergeant, May 29th, 1864 ; he was absent, sick, from 
August 19th, 1863, to February 8th, 1864; he participated in the 
following battles : Harper's Ferry, (Gettysburg and the Wilder- 
ness ; he was wounded in action in the battle of the Wilderness, 
May 6th, 1864, resulting in the loss of an arm, and was discharged 
at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, December 23d, 1864. 

William R. Tixdle was born in Ireland, and was by occupa- 
tion a cabinet-maker ; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged twenty- 
five years ; he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's 
Ford, the Wilderness, Po River, Spotsylvania, Xorth Anna 
River, Tolopotomoy and Cold Harbor, and was killed in action 
at the battle of Cold Harbor, June 1st, 1864. 

Tiiadeus B. Twiti hell was born iii Potter, New York, and 
was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 18th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years ; he participated in the following battles : 
Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg and Auburn Ford; and was killed in 
fiction at Auburn Ford, Virginia, October 4th, 1863. 



Johx Vaughx was born in Chemung county, New York, and 
by occupation was a coop>er ; he participated in the battle of 
Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, 
and was sent to general hospital, sick, from Centreville, Virginia, 
June 25th, 1863 ; he was transferred to the Invalid Corps, Sep- 
tember 1st, 1863, and was subsequently discharged from the 
service. 

Ciiaiii.es S. Waters was born in Pultney, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted July 1st, 1802, aged twenty- 
five years; he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettys- 
burg, Mine Run and Morton's Ford; he was detached with the 
provost guard at Head-quarters, 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, 
and served in that capacity, in all the campaigns of the army, 
until the close of the war, when he was discharged with the 
Reu'iment. 



Bioghaphicaij Sketches. 41 f) 

James E. Warner was born in Potter, Yates county, New 
York, and was by occupation a farmer ; lie enlisted July 7th, 
1862, aged nineteen years, and participated in the battles of Har- 
per's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station and Mine 
Run; he was detailed as hospital attendant, January 24th, 1864; 
rejoined the Regiment November 9th, 1864, and participated in 
the battles of the campaign of 1865 ; he was taken prisoner in 
action at Sutherland's Station, Virginia, April 2d, 1865, and 
returned to the Regiment after the surrender of Lee, at Appo- 
mattox Court-house ; he was discharged Avith the Regiment at 
the close of the war. 

Martix Youxos was born in Canadaigua, New York, and by 
occupation was a shoemaker; he enlisted July 10th, 1862, aged 
thirty-five years; he deserted September 25th, 1862, rejoined the 
Regiment February 14th, 1863, and was restored to duty by order 
of Major-General Casey, February 20th, 1863 ; he Avas left sick in 
hospital, at Frederick, Maryland, June 28th, 1863, and was dis- 
charged for disability at Annapolis Junction, Maryland, October 
13th, 1863- 

Recruits. 

Abel D. Allkx was born in Prattsburgh, New York, and 
enlisted March 13th, 1864, for three years; he joined the Regi- 
ment, June 5th, 1864, and was on duty Avith it until the close of 
the Avar. 

William II. II. Braixard was born in Binghamton, New York, 
and by profession was an attorney ; he enlisted December 22d, 
1862, aged twenty-three years, and joined the Regiment for duty 
January 18th, 1865 ; he was promoted to First Lieutenant and 
Adjutant of the 125th Regiment New York Volunteers by com- 
mission, and mustered to date from January 24th, 1865. 

Thomas Hamilton was born at ('old Springs, New York, and 
enlisted January 2<>th, 1865, aged twenty-two years ; he joined 
the Regiment for duty, February 15th, 1 S(i5, and participated in 
tlic battles until the close of the Avar, Avhen he was transferred to 
the 4th New York Heavy Artillery, upon discharge of the Regi- 
ment. 



41(j 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

John Lyons was born in Cold Springs, New York, and enlisted 
January 20th, 1865, aged twenty-one years ; he joined the 
Regiment for duty, February 15th, 1865 ; participated in the 
battles of the campaign of 1865, and was transferred to the 4th 
o\ T ew York Heavy Artillery upon the discharge of the Regiment. 

Michael O'Brikx was horn in Ireland, and enlisted December 
12th, 1864; he particijiated with the Regiment in the battles of 
the campaign of 1865 ; was taken prisoner in action at Sutherland's 
Station, Virginia, April 2d, 1865, and released upon the sur- 
render of Lee at Appomattox Court-house, Virginia, April 9th, 
1865 ; he was transferred to the 4th New York Heavy Artillery 
upon the discharge of the Regiment at the close of the war. 



Biographical Sketches. 417 



COMPAXT B 



Company B was raised principally in Yates county, quite a 
large proportion of the men being residents of the southern part 
of the county; the Company was recruited by its commissioned 
officers, assisted by the local war committees of the county, and 
it was the second to rendezvous at Camp Swift, Geneva, with a full 
complement of men, the Company organization bearing date 
August 8th, 1862. The following were its original line officers: 

William A. Coleman, Captain. 

Richard A. Bassett, First Lieutenant. 

Meteliaii H. Lawrence, Second Lieutenant. 

Non-Commissioned Officers. 

Oscar C. Squier was born in Oswego county, Xew York, and 
was a lawyer by profession; he enlisted July 26th, 1862, aged 
twenty-six years, and was appointed First Sergeant upon the 
organization of the Company ; he participated in the battles of 
Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, 
Mine Run and the Wilderness ; he was wounded in action in 
the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864, and was commis- 
sioned as Second Lieutenant, but did not muster ; upon consoli- 
dation of the Regiment, December 25th, 1864, he was mustered 
out as supernumerary. 

T. Spkvcki: Hariiisox. See Chaplain T Spkxcer Harrison, 
page 364. 

Erasmus E. I5assett was burn in Barrington, Yates county, 
Xew York, and was by occupation a teacher; he enlisted August 
4th, 1862, aged twenty six years; was appointed Sergeant upon 
the organization of the Company, and promoted to Color Sergeant 
May 1st, lso.S ; he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Gettysburg, and was killed in action at Gettysburg, Penn- 
sylvania, .Inly 2d, 18C>:i, while carrying the colors of the Itegi- 
ment, in the charge made l>y the Brigade, in the afternoon of 
that day, in support of the 3d Army Corps. 



418 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

Henry P, Cook. See Sergeant-Major Henry P. Cook, page 394. 

Henry 0. Childs was born in Canandaigua, New York; 
enlisted July 30th, 1862, aged twenty-three years, and was 
appointed Sergeant ; he participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, and deserted at Chicago, Illinois, November 21st, 1862. 

Edwin Jessop was born in Tyrone, New York, and was a clerk 
by occupation ; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged twenty-four 
years, and was appointed Corporal upon the organization of the 
Company; lie was promoted to Sergeant, August 22d, 1862, 
and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg ; 
he was severely wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
July 2d, 1863 ; was subsequently transferred to the Veteran 
Reserve Corps, and discharged from the service at the close of the 
war. 

Edward Knapp was born in Barrington, Yates county, New 
York, and by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted July 30th, 
1 862, aged eighteen years, and was appointed Corporal ; he was 
severely wounded in action upon Maryland Heights, Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 1862, and was discharged on 
account of wounds at Elmira, New York, in January, 1863. 

Martin V McCarrick was born in Wantage, New Jersey, 
and by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, 
and was appointed Corporal ; he was promoted to Sergeant, 
December 2d, 1862, and participated in the following battles: 
Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine 
Run, Morton's Ford, the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, 
North Anna River, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Deep 
Bottom, Strawberry Plains and Ream's Station, where he was 
taken prisoner in action August 25th, 1864; he died in rebel 
prison, in Salisbury, North Carolina, December 14th, 1864. 

George Chapman was born in Chicago, Illinois, and by occu- 
pation was a lumberman; he enlisted August 6th 1862, aged 
twenty-three years, and was appointed Corporal ; he was in the 
battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, the Wilderness and Po 
River ; was wounded in action on Maryland Heights, Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 1862, and again in action at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863; he rejoined the Regi- 



Biographical Sketches. 41^ 

ment before the opening of the campaign of 1864, and was killed 
in action in the battle of Po River, Virginia, May 10th, 1864. 

William McAllister was born in Penn Yan, New York, and 
by occupation was a painter; he enlisted August 2d, 1862, and 
was appointed Corporal ; he participated in the battle of Har- 
per's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and 
was discharged for disability at Chicago, Illinois, in January, 1863. 

Samuel A. Nichols was born in Milo, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation; he enlisted August 2d, 1862, and was 
appointed Corporal upon organization of the Company ; he par- 
ticipated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg, and 
was killed in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863. 

Henry S. Nichols was born in Milo, New York, and was by 
occupation a wagon-maker; he enlisted August 2d, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and was appointed Corporal at the date of the 
organization of the Company ; he was promoted to Sergeant July 
1st, 1864 ; and was absent sick from September to December 25th, 
1863: he participated in the following battles: Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Morton's Ford, and the Wilderness ; he was severely 
wounded in the neck in the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 
1864, but rejoined the Regiment in September, 1864, and was 
detailed provost guard at Head-quarters 2d Army Corps ; he was 
mustered out, as supernumerary, December 25th, 1864, upon con- 
solidation of the Regiment. 

Elias A. Nomas was born in Bennington, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 2d, 1862, aged 
twenty-two years, and was appointed Corporal upon the organi- 
zation of the Company; he participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg, and was killed in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863. 

Enlisted Men. 

William II. Armstrong was born in Warwick, New York, and 
by occupation was a laborer; he enlisted July 30th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and was appointed Corporal, December 2d, 
1862; lie was sent to general hospital, June 27th, 1863, but 
rejoined the Regiment October 19th, 1S63; he participated in 

27 



420 12Gth Regiment Xew York Volunteers. 

the battles of Harper's Ferry, Morton's Ford, and the Wilderness ; 
he was wounded in action at the battle of the Wilderness, May 
6th, 1864, returned to the Regiment in October of the same year, 
and was mustered out as supernumerary upon consolidation of the 
Regiment, December 25, 1864. 

Charles W Austin" was born in Benton, New York, and In- 
occupation was a boat builder; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, 
aged twenty-seven years ; he was in action at Harper's Ferry, 
and deserted at Chicago, Illinois, September 24th, 1862. 

Oren Bates was born in Starkey, New York, and was a farmer 
by occupation ; he was in the battles at Harper's Ferry, Gettys- 
burg and Morton's Ford ; and was wounded in action at Gettys- 
burg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863; he was detached as provost 
guard at Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and 
served in that capacity until the close of the war, when he was 
discharged with the Regiment. 

Melvijst Bunce was born in Barrington, New York ; by occu- 
pation was a farmer, and enlisted July 30th, 1862, aged nineteen 
years ; he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, and was 
killed in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863. 

Rollin G. Beach was born in Sandersville, Massachusetts, and 
was by occupation a printer; he enlisted July 30th, 1862, aged 
twenty-three years ; he participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and was killed in 
action on Bolivar Heights, Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 
15th, 1862. 

William II. Bowex was born in Kennebeck, Maine, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged 
twenty-eight years ; he participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry ; was wounded in action on Bolivar Heights, Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 15th, 1862, and died of wounds 
received in action, October 24th, 1862. 

James F Butler was born in Bradford, New York; he 
enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged eighteen years ; was in the bat- 
tle of Harper's Ferry, and deserted at Chicago, Illinois, Novem 
ber21st, 1862. 



Biographical Sketches. 421 

James Badger was born in Livingston county, New York, 
and enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged twenty-one years; he was in 
the battle of Harper's Ferry, and deserted at Chicago, Illinois, 
November 21st, 1862. 

Ansel Brace was born in Tyrone, New York, and was by 
occupation a laborer; he enlisted July 28th, 1862; participated in 
the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 
15th, 1862, and was sent to general hospital, sick, June 25th, 1863 ; 
he was discharged for disability April 11th, 1864. 

Reuben Bullock was born in Barrington, New York, and was 
a laborer by occupation ; he enlisted July 30th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years ; he participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg ; was severely wounded in action at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863, and discharged on 
account of wounds received in action April 11th, 1864. 

Nathax D. Beeden was born in Michigan, and was by occu- 
pation a farmer ; he enlisted August 6th, 1 862, aged nineteen years ; 
he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg, 
was wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 
1863; but rejoined the Regiment and -was detached provost guard 
at Head-quarters, 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1 864 ; he served in 
that capacity until August 25th, 1864, when he was taken prisoner 
in action at the battle of Ream's Station, Virginia ; he was sub- 
sequently released and returned to his home at the close of the 
war. 

Jonx Blaxsett was born in Yates county, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; lie enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged 
twenty years ; he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Gettysburg ; was wounded in action on Maryland Heights, 
Harper's Ferry, Virginia, Sejrtembcr 13th, 1862, and again seri- 
ously, in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863 ; he 
was transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, November 6th, 
1863, and discharged from the service at the close of the war. 

.Iamks M. Booth was born in Urbana, New York, and by 
occupation was a laborer; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years; and participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and loth, 1862; he died of 



422 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

small-pox, in regimental hospital, in camp near Union Mills, Vir- 
ginia, December 31st, 1862. 

Moses U. Booth was born in Urbana, New York, and was a 
laborer by occupation ; he enlisted July 26th, 1862, aged twenty- 
three years ; he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg ; was seriously wounded in action at Gettysburg, Vir- 
ginia, July 2d, 1863; rejoined the Regiment, February 11th, 1864, 
and was detailed as hospital attendant, serving in that capacity 
until the close of the war, when he was discharged with the 
Regiment. 

Isaac Bellis was born in Eaton, New York, and by occupa- 
tion was a cooper; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged forty-four 
years ; he participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th, and 15th, 1862, and was killed in action on 
Bolivar Heights, Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 15th, 1862. 

William Cassion was born in Ireland; was a farmer by 
occupation, and enlisted August 1st, 1862, aged twenty-three 
years ; he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Get- 
tysburg, and the Wilderness ; was wounded in action at Gettys- 
burg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863 ; rejoined the Regiment 
January 16th, 1864, and was wounded and taken prisoner in the 
battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864; he was subsequently 
released, and returned to his home at the close of the war. 

Edwin Coryell was born in Seneca, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a laborer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged twenty- 
eight years ; he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg, and was wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, July 2d, 1863. Subsequently he was transferred to the 
Veteran Reserve Corps, and discharged from the service at the 
close of the war. 

Benjamin F. Chase was born in Delaware county, New York, 
and by occupation was a farmer ; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, 
aged twenty-nine years ; he participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; was 
detailed as teamster, December 2d, 1862, and served as such until 
the close of the war, when he was discharged with the Regiment. 



Biographical Sketches. 423 

Charles H. Dunning was born in Yates county, New York, 
and was by occupation a laborer ; he was in the battles of 
Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg, and was wounded in action at 
Gettysburg, July 3d, 1863 ; he was detached with the provost 
guard at Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and 
taken prisoner in action at Ream's Station, Virginia, August 25th, 
1864; he was subsequently released and returned to his home at 
the close of the war. 

Geo. W Davis was born in Starkey, New York, and was by 
occupation a laborer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged twenty- 
seven years, and was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; he deserted at Centreville, 
Virginia, June 25th, 1863, but returned to the Regiment, Sep- 
tember 23d, 1863 ; was missing in action at the battle of the Wil- 
derness, May 6th, 1864 ; and probably killed. 

Isaac P De Pew was born in Ontario county, New York, and 
by occupation was a cooper; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged 
twenty-eight years ; he participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; was sent 
to general hospital, sick, April 1st, 1863 ; transferred to the Vete- 
ran Reserve Corps, August 1st, 1863 ; and was discharged from 
the service at the close of the war. 

Oeen Edgett was born in Pultney, New York, and by occupa- 
tion was a farmer ; he enlisted August 4th, 1802, aged eighteen 
years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettys- 
burg, Auburn Ford and Bristow Station ; he was wounded in 
action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863; was detached 
in First Rhode island Battery, October istli, 1863, and was on 
duty with the Battery in the campaign of 1S64 ; he rejoined the 
Regiment, August 20th, 1864, and participated in all the battles 
until the close of the war, when he was discharged with the 
Regiment. 

IIoumje F. Ei.i.is was born in Washington county, New York, 
and by occupation was a printer; he enlisted July 30th, 1862, 
aged forty years ; was appointed Corporal, December 3d, 1863, 
and detailed as color guard; he participated in the following 
battles: Harper's Ferry, (Jettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Sta- 



424 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

tion, the Wilderness and Po River ; he was killed in action at Po 
River, Virginia, May 10th, 1864. 

Rowland LeRoy Embree was born in Torrey, Yates county, 
New York, was by occupation a farmer, and enlisted July 26th, 
1862, aged twenty years ; he participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th, and 15th, 1862 ; and was 
killed in action on Bolivar Heights, Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 15th, 1862. 

John W Finger was born in Potter, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged 
nineteen years ; he participated in the battles of Hai-per's Ferry 
and Gettysburg ; and was missing in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863. The writer has been unable to 
obtain any account of him since that date. 

Mortimer Garrison was born in Rochester, New York, and 
was by occupation a carpenter; he participated in the battles of 
Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg ; was mortally wounded in action 
at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863, and died of his 
wounds, July 18th, 1863. 

Charles W Gaylord was born in Torrey, Yates county, New 
York, and by occupation was a farmer ; he enlisted August 6th, 
1862, aged twenty-four years; participated in the battles of Har- 
per's Ferry, and Gettysburg, and was killed in action at Gettys- 
burg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863. 

James N. Griggs. See Second Lieutenant James N. Griggs, 
page 390. 

James K. P Huson was born in Seneca, New York, and was 
by occupation a farmer; he enlisted July 29th, 1862, aged twenty- 
one years ; he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg, and was killed in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylva- 
nia, July 2d, 1863. 

Will L. Hobart was born in Potter, Yates county New York, 
and was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 2d, 1862, 
aged nineteen years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg ; he was killed in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863. 



Biographical Sketches. 425 

Alexa.ndkk II. IIui'iuiTAiLiNi; was born in Pennsylvania, and 
by occupation was a laborer; he enlisted July 31st, 1862, aged 
thirty-one years; was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, and 
deserted, September 24th, 1*02. 

Amos V HouoHTAiLixt; was born in Yates county, New York, 
and was by occupation a laborer; he enlisted July 31st, 1862, 
aged twenty-seven years; he participated in the battle of Har- 
per's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and 
died of disease, at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, October 23d, 
1*02. 

Chkistopiikk Hougiitailixg was born in Starkey, New York, 
and by occupation was a laborer; he enlisted July 31st, 1862, 
aged thirty years; he participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and 
deserted, September 24th, 1862 ; he returned September 27th, 1862, 
and was restored to duty ; he was killed in action at the battle of 
the Wilderness, May 6th, 1 864. 

Charles M. Hyatt was born in Starkey, Yates county, New 
York, and was by occupation a carpenter; he enlisted August 1st, 
1*62, aged nineteen years, and was appointed Corporal, August 
1st, 1*64; he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg; was wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
July 2d, 1863, but rejoined the Regiment and was wounded in 
the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864 ; he rejoined the Regi- 
ment, September 1st, 1864, and was detached on the 21st of the 
same month as clerk, Commissary of Muster, at Head-quarters 1st 
Division, 2d Army Corps, and served in that capacity until the 
close of the war, when lie was discharged with the Regiment. 

William A. Hays was born in Yates count)', New York, and 
by occupation was a farmer; lie enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged 
twenty-two years; was in action at Harper 1 * Ferry, and deserted 
September l*th, 1*02. 

Gkokue Hays was born in Yates county, Xew York, and was 
by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 4th, 1*02, aged 
twcnty-ti\ e years ; participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
and deserted September l*th, 1*02. 



426 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

Elsworth Haight was born in Yates county, New York, and 
b>y occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged 
•eighteen years ; participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, Sej)tember 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and died of dis- 
ease, in regimental hospital, in camp near Union Mills, Virginia, 
February 6th, 1863. 

Frank R. Hamlin was born in Bedford, Ohio, and was by- 
occupation a clerk ; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged twenty- 
one years ; was detached as regimental mail carrier from Septem- 
ber 1st, 1862, to June loth, 1863; was detached as clerk at the 
Inspector-General's office at Head-quarters 1st Division 2d Army 
Corps, June 26th, 1864, and served as such until the close of the 
war ; he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettys- 
burg, the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna 
River, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, and Petersburg, and was dis- 
charged with the Regiment ; he was appointed Sergeant in 1863. 

Egbert C. Hopkins was born in Barrington, New York, and 
was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and participated in the following battles : 
Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine 
Run, Morton's Ford, and Wilderness ; he was wounded in the 
battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864; rejoined the Regiment 
and was appointed Corporal, August 1st, 1864 ; he was detailed 
as provost guard at Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, and served in 
that capacity until the close of the war, when he was discharged 
with the Regiment. 

Charles C. Hicks was born in Ontario county, New York, and 
by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years ; was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettys- 
burg, and was wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
July 2d, 1863 ; he rejoined the Regiment, December 6th, 1863 ; 
was detached as provost guard at Head-quarters 2d Army 
Corps, April 4th, 1864, and served in that capacity until the close 
of the war, when he was discharged with the Regiment. 

James E. Hicks was born in Jerusalem, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged eighteen 
years, and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 



Biographical Sketches. 427 

September 13th, 14th, and 15th, 1862; he was seriously wounded 
in the foot in the action on Bolivar Heights, Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 15th, 1862, and was discharged on account 
of wound, December 26th, 1862. 

Joseph Hollowell was born in Milo, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer ; he enlisted July 26th, 1862, aged forty-four 
years ; participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettys- 
burg, and was killed in action- at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 
3d, 1863. 

James H. Lathy was born in Orange county, New York, and 
by occupation was a cooper ; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged 
thirty-one years ; the records of the Company show that he 
was wounded in the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864, and 
at Boydton Road, March 31st, 1865. The writer has been unable 
to learn any further in reference to his military history, but thinks 
he was in most of the battles of the Regiment, and discharged 
at the close of the war. 

Luther C. Lott was born in Yates county, New York, and 
was by occupation a shoemaker; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, 
aged twenty-six years; the records of the Company show that 
Lott was wounded near Petersburg, Virginia, June 22d, 1864 ; 
the Avriter has not been able to learn what battles he was in, but 
presumes he was with the Regiment in all the engagements until 
wounded ; one of the officers reports that he rejoined the Regi- 
ment after recovering from his wounds, and was discharged witli 
it at the close of the war. 

Rk'Hatid H. Miles was born in Harrington, New York, and 
was by occupation a farmer; lie enlisted August 2d, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1SC2; he was after- 
ward detached as teamster 1st Division Ambulance Corps, and 
served in that capacity until the close of the war, when he was 
discharged with the Regiment. 

Nelson Millis was burn in Greene county, New York, and by 
occupation was a painter; he enlisted August 5th, 1S02, aged 
forty-four years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Mine Run ; he was taken prisoner in action at Mine Run, 



428 126th Regiment New York Vollwteehs. 

Virginia, November 30th, 1863, and died in rebel prison at Rich- 
mond, Virginia, March 11th, 1864. 

James H. Moshier was born in Milo, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a farmer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged twenty- 
one years ; participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; was detached in Brigade 
Ambulance Corps, January 10th, 1863, and remained on duty in 
that capacity until the close of the war, when he was discharged 
with the Regiment. 

Edgar F. Millard was born in Starkey, New York, and was 
by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged 
twenty-four years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station and Mine Run ; he 
was detached as teamster, January 17th, 1864, and served in such 
capacity until mustered out of the service ; he was discharged 
with the Regiment at the close of the war. 

Anson Matthews was born in Milo, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged eighteen 
years, and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and loth, 1862 ; he died in regimental hos- 
pital in camp near Union Mills, Virginia, March 2d, 1863. 

Thomas T. McCarrick was born in "Wantage, New Jersey, and 
was a shoemaker by occupation; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, 
aged twenty-seven years, and was appointed Corporal, December 
14th, 1862 ; he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg ; was severely wounded in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863, and mustered out of the service as 
supernumerary, upon consolidation of the Regiment, December, 
25th, 1864. 

George Moore was born in Milo, New York, and by occupa- 
tion was a carpenter; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged tAventy- 
eight years, and was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, September 
13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; he was detailed as Brigade Pioneer, 
December 10th, 1862, and served in such capacity until the close 
of the war, when he was discharged with the Regiment. 

Peter W Norman was born in Yates county, New York, and 
was a farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 7th 1862, aged 



Biographical Sketches. 429 

twenty-two years; lie participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg, and was wounded in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d, 186.3 ; he was transferred to the Veteran 
Reserve Corps, November is, 186:3, and subsequently discharged 
from the service. 

John H. Osborn was born in Barrington, New York, and was 
by occupation a carpenter; he enlisted August 2d, 1862, aged 
twenty-two years, and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th, and 15th, 1862 ; he was dis- 
charged for disability at Union Mills, Virginia, February 13th, 
1863. 

Caleb Osborn was born in Yates county, Xew York, and by 
occupation was a boatman ; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged 
twenty-six years ; was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, and 
deserted September 25th, 1862. 

Charles R. Pinneo was born in Oneida county, New York, 
and was by occupation a harness-maker ; he enlisted August 5th, 
1862, aged thirty-eight years, and participated in the battle of 
Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; 
he was on duty in hospital, and absent sick for most of the time 
while the Regiment was in the service, and was mustered out for 
disability, near the close of the war. In the winter of 1862 and 
'63 he was nurse in the small pox-hospital, near Union Mills, Vir- 
ginia, and rendered valuable service in that capacity. 

Franklin K. Pettinchll Mas born in Auburn, New York, and 
was by occupation a boatman ; he enlisted August Oth, 1862, 
aged eighteen years ; he participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg, and was wounded in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania,, July 2d, 1S03; he Avas subsequently transferred to 
the Veteran Reserve Corps, and discharged from the service at 
the close of the war. 

David Peiuho was born in Barrington, New York, and was 
by occupation a laborer; he enlisted August Oth, 1862, aged 
thirty years ; was in action at Harper's Ferry, and deserted at 
Chicago, Illinois, November 21st, 1*62. 

Stephen C. Purdy was born in Jerusalem, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August Oth, 1802, aged 



430 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

nineteen years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Gettysburg ; he was wounded in action at Gettysburg, Penn- 
sylvania, July 2d, 1863 ; rejoined the Regiment in the winter of 
1864, and Mas again wounded in the battle of the Wilderness, 
May 6th, 1864; he afterward came to the Regiment, but was 
returned to general hospital on account of wounds, and was mus- 
tered out of the service at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, June 15th, 
1865. 

Amos J. Potter was born in Yates county, New York, and 
was a merchant by occupation; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, 
aged eighteen years ; participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg, and was severely wounded in action at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863 ; he rejoined the Regi- 
ment December 18th, 1863, and was wounded in action in the 
battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864, resulting in the loss of 
the left arm, and was discharged on account of wounds at Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia, June 10th, 1865. 

Oerex Potter was born at Athens, Pennsylvania, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged twenty- 
seven years ; participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, and 
was discharged on account of disability at Chicago, Illinois, 
December 24th, 1862. 

Andrew Putnam was born in Yates county, New York, and 
by occupation was a moulder; he enlisted July 31st, 1862, aged 
twenty-three years ; he participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 1.4th and 15th, 1862, and died of 
disease in regimental hospital in camp near Union Mills, Vir- 
ginia, January 13th, 1863. 

Albert Quick was born in Havanna, New York, and by occu- 
pation Avas a miller; he enlisted August 2d, 1862, aged thirty- 
two years; participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and was killed in action on 
Bolivar Heights, Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 15th, 1862. 

William Raymond was born in Palmyra, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years ; participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Gettysburg; was mortally wounded in action at Gettysburg, 



Biographical Sketches. 431 

Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1803, and died of wounds received in 
action, July 18th, 1863. 

John Nelson Boney was born in Milo, Xew York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 2d, 1862, aged 
eighteen years ; participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Vir- 
ginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; and was discharged 
for disability at Union Mills, Virginia, February 19th, 1863. 

Orlando B. Smith was born in Starkey, Xew York, and was 
by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years ; he was slightly wounded in the battle of the Wil- 
derness, May 6th, 1864; did not rejoin the Regiment, and was 
discharged at the close of the Avar ; the writer has been unable to 
learn what battles he participated in before being wounded. 

Joseph B. Snyder was born in Orange county, Xew York, 
and was by occupation a laborer; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, 
aged twenty-four years; was in action at Harper's Ferry, and 
deserted September 26th, 1862. 

Albert S. Spkague was born in Torrey, Yates county, Xew 
York, and by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 4th, 
1862, aged eighteen years; participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; and died 
of disease in regimental hospital, camp near Union Mills, Vir- 
ginia, January 17th, 1863. 

Wilber F Stanton was born in Ontario county, New Y'ork, 
and by occupation was a carpenter; he was in action at Harper s 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1802 ; and was 
discharged for disability, January 22d, 1803. 

IiniiEUT B. Sutton was born in Orange county, Xew York, 
and was by occupation a shoemaker ; he eidisted August 4th, 
1802, aged twenty-four years; he participated in the battles of 
Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg; was wounded in action at Get- 
tysburg, Pennsylvania, duly 2d, 1803; was absent until June, 
1804; and was discharged on account of wounds February 27th, 
1S05. 

Ghaki.es P Stkvkns was born in Ontario county, Xew York, 
and by occupation was a painter; he enlisted July 31st, 1802, 



432 126 tm Regiment New York Volunteers. 

aged thirty-three years ; participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg ; was sent to general hospital, sick, from 
Elk Run, Virginia, September, 1863, and died at Washington, 
District of Columbia, November 5th 1863 ; he was appointed Ser- 
geant before being sent to general hospital. 

Asa Sherwood was born in Barrington, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation; he enlisted July 30th, 1862, aged twenty- 
one years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Get- 
tysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's 
Ford, and the Wilderness ; he was missing in action, battle of the 
Wilderness, May 6th, 1864; he is reported to have been seen 
afterward at Lynchburg, Virginia, mortally wounded, and is pro- 
bably dead. 

Charles A Seward was born in Dundee, New York, and was 
by occupation a printer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged nine- 
teen years; was in action at Harper's Ferry, and deserted Septem- 
ter 6th, 1862. 

Albert Thomas was born in Torrey, Yates county, New 
York, and was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 4th, 
1862, aged nineteen years, and participated in the following bat- 
tles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, 
Mine Run, and Morton's Ford ; he was detached as provost guard 
at Head-quarters 2d Arm}- Corps, April 4th, 1864, and served in 
such capacity until the termination of the war, when he was dis- 
charged with the Regiment. 

William H. Thomas was born in Torrey, Yates countv New 
York, and was a farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 4th, 
1862, aged twenty-one years ; he participated in the battles of 
Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg ; was severely wounded in action 
at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1862, and discharged on 
account of wounds received in action, October 20th, 1864. 

Lewis Trimmer was born in Jerusalem, New York, and by 
occupation a farmer ; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged eighteen 
years ; he participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; and was killed in action 
on Bolivar Heights, Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 15th, 
1862. 



Biographical Sketches. 433 

George Tyler was born in Clarkville, Ohio, and by occupation 
a laborer; lie enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged eighteen years; 
the writer is unable to state definitely in reference to Tyler ; 
lie was in some of the earlier battles of the Regiment, was 
wounded in the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864, and 
subsequently died of his wounds. 

John R. Tuttle was born in Starkey, Yates county, New 
York, and by occupation a laborer; he enlisted August 11th, 
1 862, aged nineteen years ; he participated in the battle of 
Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th, and 15th, 1862; 
and was killed in action on Bolivar Heights, Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 15th, 1862. 

Joseph R. Tuttle was born in Starkey, Yates county, New 
York, and by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, 
aged twenty-two years, and participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he was 
killed in action on Bolivar Heights, Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 15th, 1862. 

James Updike was born in Tompkins county, New York, and 
by occupation a laborer; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged 
twenty-seven years, and participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; he was 
detailed as teamster in June, 1863, and served as such until the 
close of the war, when he was discharged with the Regiment. 

James E. Walker was born in Lyons, New York, and by 
occupation a laborer ; he eidisted August 6th, 1862, aged thirty- 
three years; was in action at Harper's Ferry, and deserted at 
Chicago, Illinois, November, 21st, 1862. 

Jkrry Wall was born in Geneva, New York, and by occupa- 
tion was a farmer; lie enlisted July 30th, 1862, aged twenty-one 
years, and participated in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and Mor- 
ton's Ford ; he was detached as provost guard at Head-quarters 2d 
Army Corps, April 41 h, 1*64, and served in such capacity until 
the (dose of the war; in the winter of 1865 lie was presented 
with a "medal of honor" by Major-General Meadk, commanding 
the Army of the Potomac, pursuant to an act of Congress, for 



434 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

capturing a rebel flag at the battle of Gettysburg, July 3d, 1863 ; 
he was discharged with the Regiment. 

Luther Weaver was born in Yates county, New York, and 
was a farmer by occupation; he enlisted July 30th, 1862, aged 
twenty-six years, and participated in the following battles : Har- 
per's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine- 
Run, Morton's Ford, the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, 
North Anna, Cold Harbor and Petersburg ; he was wounded in 
action near Petersburg, Virginia, June 22d, 1864 ; did not rejoin 
the Regiment, and was discharged at the close of the war. 

Richard Wheatost was born in Milo, New York ; enlisted 
August 6th, 1862, aged forty-four years, and by occupation a 
farmer ; he participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, and was 
soon after discharged for disability 

David J. Wilkin was born in Starkey, New York ; enlisted 
July 31st, 1862, a farmer by occupation, aged twenty-four years: 
he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg ; 
was severely wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
July 2d, 1863; was subsequently transferred to the Veteran 
Reserve Corps, and discharged from the service at the close of 
the war. 

Josiah Wolf was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and 
enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged twenty-five years; he was in 
the battle of Harper's Ferry, and deserted while on the way to 
Chicago ; he subsequently rejoined the Regiment, remained a 
day or two, deserted again, and did not afterward return to the 
Regiment. 



Biographical Skktchks. 435 



OOMPAXY O. 



Company C was raised in the southern part of Seneca count}', 
mostly in the vicinity of Ovid, Lodi and Romulus, and was 
recruited by its commissioned officers, assisted by many of the 
enlisted men and the War Committees of the county and Senato- 
rial district. It was raised rapidly, being the third Company to 
arrive in camp at Geneva with a full complement of men. The 
company organization bears date August 9th, 1862, and the fol- 
lowing were the original commissioned line officers: 

Wixfield Scott, Captain. 

Thomas R. Louxsbitry, First Lieutenant. 

Albert M. Porter, Second Lieutenant. 

Xox-commiksioxei> Officers. 

Dextox E. Bixgiiam was born in Camillus, New York, and 
was a farmer by occupation; he enlisted July 29th, 1862, aged 
twenty-three years, and was appointed First Sergeant upon the 
organization of the Company ; he was in action at the battles of 
Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; 
and at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 3d and 4th, 1863 ; he 
was sent to general hospital, sick, from Elk Run, Virginia, in 
August, 1863, and subsequently discharged on account of physi- 
cal disability. 

David X Smith was born in Now Jersey, and was by occupa- 
tion a farmer; lie enlisted August .">tli, 1862, aged twenty-nine 
years, and was appointed Sergeant upon the organization of the 
Company; he was in action at the battle of Harper's Ferry, Vir- 
ginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; and died of small- 
pox in regimental hospital, camp near Union Mills, Virginia, in 
the winter of IS63. 

Ai.r.Kirr III ff was born in Ovid, New York, and was by occu- 
pation a farmer; he enlisted July 29th, 1862, aged twenty-live 
years, and was appointed Sergeant upon the organization of the 

28 



436 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

Company, while at Camp Swift, Geneva ; he participated in the 
following battles: Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, 
Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, the Wilderness, Po 
River, Spottsylvania, North Anna River, Tolopotomoy, Cold 
Harbor and Petersburg ; he was severely wounded in the arm, 
in action, near Petersburg, Virginia, June 16th, 1864; was pro- 
moted and commissioned Second Lieutenant, October 14th, 1863, 
but was not mustered on account of the reduced numbers of the 
Regiment ; he was mustered out as supernumerary on consolida- 
tion of the Regiment December 25th, 1864. 

Benjamin F. Swaethout was born in Lodi, Seneca county, 
New York, and was by occupation a merchant ; he enlisted Aug- 
ust 8th, 1862, aged twenty-four years, and was appointed Ser- 
geant ; he participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, July 2d and 3d, 1863, and was severely wounded in action 
at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1862 ; he was commissioned 
in the winter of 1862, First Lieutenant United States Colored 
Cavalry, and served in that capacity until the close of the war, 
acting a portion of the time as regimental quartermaster, and 
was discharged from the service with his Regiment. 

Sidney E. Brown. See Second Lieutenant Sidney E. Brown, 
page 387. 

Madison Coveet was born in Lodi, New York, and was a far- 
rier by occupation ; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged twenty- 
four years, and was appointed Corporal upon the organization of 
the Company ; he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Gettysburg, and was severely wounded in action at Gettys- 
burg, Pennsylvania, July 4th, 1863 ; he was mustered out as 
supernumerary upon consolidation of the Regiment, December 
25th, 1864. 

John L. Ryno was born in Farmer, New York, and was by 
occupation a machinist; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged 
twenty-seven years, and was appointed Corporal ; he participated 
in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th 
and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 3d and 
4th, 1863 ; he was subsequently detailed as musician, Brigade 



Biographical Sketches. 437 

band, and served in that capacity until the close of the war; was 
discharged with the Regiment. 

Charles T. Harris was born in Sheldrake, New York, and 
was by occupation a merchant ; he enlisted August 5th, 1863, 
aged twenty-two years, and was appointed Corporal upon the 
organization of the Company ; he was in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Get- 
tysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d and 3d, 1863, and was killed in 
action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863. 

Edgar H. McQitig was born in Covert, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged twenty 
years, and was appointed Corporal ; he j)articipated in the battles 
of Haider's Ferry and Gettysburg, and was severely wounded in 
action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863. After recov- 
ery from his wounds, he was commissioned as Second Lieutenant 
in the Veteran Reserve Corps, and served in that capacity until 
the close of the war, when he was discharged from the service. 

William H. Cole was born in Covert, New York, and was by 
•occupation a farmer ; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged twenty- 
one years, and was appointed Corporal upon the formation of 
the Company ; he was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Get- 
tysburg, and was severely wounded in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863; he subsequently rejoined the Regi- 
ment, and was wounded in action at the battle of the Wilder- 
ness, May 6th, 1864, and was discharged, on account of wounds, 
at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 'Zth, 1865. 

Andrew Ciiesnut was born in Ireland, and by occupation was 
a farmer; lie enlisted August 8th, 1K62, aged twenty-four years, 
and was appointed Corporal ; he participated in the following bat- 
tles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, 
Mine Run, and Morton's Ford, and was killed in action at Mor- 
ton's Ford, February 6th, 1S64. 

Jamks Sri'LL was born in Ovid, New York, and was a farmer 
by occupation; he enlisted July 29th, 1S02, aged twenty-two 
years, and was appointed Corporal; he was in the battles of Har- 
per's Ferry and Gettysburg, and was severely wounded in action 
at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1S63 ; he was subsequently 



438 126th Regime xt New York Volunteers. 

transferred to the Invalid Corps, and was discharged from the 
service at the close of the war. 

Meeritt "W Bingham was born in Camillas, New York, and 
was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged 
twenty years, and was appointed Corporal upon the organization 
of the Company; he was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettys- 
burg and Auburn Ford, and was severely wounded in action at 
Auburn Ford, Virginia, October 14th, 1864 ; he rejoined the 
Regiment in the winter of 1864, and was detached provost guard 
at Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864; he died of dis- 
ease while at home on furlough, December 23d, 1864. 

Privates. 

George W Bogardus was born in Hector, New York, and 
was by occupation a blacksmith; he enlisted July 29th, 1862, 
aged nineteen years, and participated in the following battles : 
Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine 
Run, and Morton's Ford ; he was detached provost guard, Head- 
quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and served in that 
capacity until the close of the war ; he was discharged with the 
Regiment. 

Eugene C. Baker was born in Lodi, New York, and was by 
occupation a carpenter; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged 
twenty-three years, and was in action as follows : Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Mine Run and Morton's Ford ; he was 
detached provost guard, at Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, April 
4th, 1864, and served in that capacity with the army until the 
termination of the war, being discharged with the Regiment. 

jSJoys S. Berlew was born in Sheldrake, New York, and was 
a farmer by occupation; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged 
twenty years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, July 2d, 3d, and 4th, 1863 ; he was left on duty in hospital, 
at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 5th, 1863, and was subse- 
quently discharged from the service. 

Charles Bailey was born in Tompkins county, New York, 
and was by occupation a machinist ; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, 



Biographical Sketches. 439 

aged twenty-eight years ; participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th, and 15th, 1862, and was 
subsequently discharged from the service for physical disability. 

Lyjiax Brock was born in Farmington, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer ; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged twenty- 
five years ; and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, Sep- 
tember 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; he was sent to general hospital, 
sick, while on the march to Gettysburg, June 27th, 1863, and 
was detached on duty in hospital at Washington, District of Col- 
umbia ; he was discharged at the close of the war. 

Johx Boxd was born in Somerset, Michigan, and by occupation 
was a farmer; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged twenty-two 
years ; and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg ; 
he was severely wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
July 3d, 1863, and was subsequently discharged from the service 
on account of wounds. 

Oscar D. Blue was born in Sheldrake, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged twenty- 
one years, he participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Vir- 
ginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; and died of disease 
at Chicago, Illinois, October 26th, 1862. 

Covert A. Barnum was born in Otsego county, New York, 
and was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 1st, 1862, 
aged twenty-three years, and participated in all the battles of 
the Regiment, as follows: Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn 
Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, Wilderness, 
Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna River, Tolopotomoy, Cold 
Harbor, Petersburg, Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, Ream's 
Station, Hatcher's Run, Boydtou Road, Sutherland's Station, 
Karmville and Appomattox ; he was never absent, Mounded or 
sick while in the service, and was discharged with the Regiment 
at the close of the war; he was appointed Sergeant, and carried 
the colors of the Regiment, alter January 22d, in all its battles, 
until discharged. 

Sam tel Blue was born in Sheldrake, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 1st, 1S62, aged twenty- 
two vears, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, 



440 126th Regulext New York Volunteers. 

Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d and 3d, 1863, and was killed in action at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863. 

Cornelius L. Baily was born in Ronmlus, New York, and In- 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Vir- 
ginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d and 3d, 1863 ; he was killed in action at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863. 

Spencer J. Colyix was born in Fayette, New York, and was 
by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d and 3d, 1863; he was severely wounded 
in action, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863, and was 
subsequently discharged from the service on account of -wounds. 

Abijah B. D. Covert was born in Ovid, New York, and by 
occupation was a blacksmith ; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and was jn the following battles : Harper's Ferry r 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's 
Ford, the Wilderness, and Po River ; he was severely wounded 
in action at Po River, May 10th, 1864, and was afterward dis- 
charged from the service on account of wounds. 



s v 



Lyman Covert was born in Romulus, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer ; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged twenty- 
two years ; he participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, and 
deserted at Chicago, Illinois, while the Regiment was under 
parole. 

Henry H. Covert was born in Ovid, New York, and was by 
occupation a carpenter; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged 
twenty-four years, and was in the following battles with the 
Regiment : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow 
Station, Mine Run and Morton's Ford ; he was detached provost 
guard, Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and served 
in such capacity until the termination of the war, when he was 
discharged with the Regiment. 



Biographical Sketches. 441 

David F Covert whs born in Ovid, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a farmer ; lie enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged twenty- 
seven years, and participated in all the battles of the Regiment 
as follows : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow 
Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, the "Wilderness, Po River, 
Spottsylvania, North Anna River, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, 
Petersburg, Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, Ream's Station, 
Hatcher's Run, Boydton Road, Sutherland's Station, Farmville 
and Appomattox ; he was appointed Corporal after the battle of 
Gettysburg, subsequently promoted to Sergeant, and was com- 
missioned Second Lieutenant in the fall of 1864, but was unable 
to muster in consequence of the reduced condition of the com- 
mand ; he was discharged with the Regiment at the close of the 
war. 

William R. Covert was born in Lodi, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged twenty- 
four years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg ; 
he was subsequently detached 3d Brigade band, and serving in 
that capacity until the close of the war, Mas discharged with the 
Regiment. 

William H. Covert was born in Ovid, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 5th, 18(52, aged 
eighteen years and was in action as follows : Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and Mor- 
ton's Ford ; he was detached as provost guard at Head-quarters 
2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1804, and served in such capacity 
until the termination of the war, and was discharged with the 
Regiment. 

Abram Covert was born in Romulus, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged thirty- 
one years; was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, Sep- 
tember 13th, 14th and 13th, 1802, and deserted while the Regi- 
inent Mas en route for Chicago, Illinois. 

Kv.NAiai B. Covkkt was born in Ovid, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted .August 5th, 1862, aged nineteen 
years, and participated in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and Mor- 



442 T26th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

ton s Ford ; he was detached as provost guard at Head-quarters 
2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and continued on duty in such 
capacity until the termination of the war, when he was discharged 
with his Regiment. 

John M. Chadwick, at the date of enlistment, was a resident 
of Ovid, Seneca county, New York ; he was among the first to 
join Company C, accompanied the Regiment to the field, and 
participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 
13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; in the winter of 1863 he was detailed 
to organize a Brigade band, and subsequently was appointed 
leader of the band, 3d Brigade, 1st Division, 2d Army Corps, in 
which capacity he served until the close of the war, when he 
was discharged ; the military history of Mr. Chadwick, prepared 
with the other members of his Company, lias been mislaid, and 
this is written by the author of these sketches from personal 
recollections, as the work goes to press, which is offered as an 
apology for its incompleteness ; the band, of which Mr. Chad- 
wick was leader, will be remembered by the officers and soldiers 
of the Regiment and Brigade as one of the best in the army ; it 
was composed largely of members of the 126th New York Vol- 
unteers, and was ever active and faithful in the discharge of its 
duties; in the severe campaign of 1864 it accompanied the 1st 
Division, 2d Army Corps hospital, from the Rapidan to Peters- 
burg, and rendered valuable services to the sick and wounded ; 
no men in the army performed their duties better or more cheer- 
fully than did those of the 3d Brigade, 1st Division, 2d Army 
Corps band. 

George J. Chadwick was born at Five Corners, New York, 
and was by occupation a teacher ; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, 
aged twenty-one years, and participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; he was sent to 
general hospital sick, while on the march to Gettysburg, June 
26th, 1863, and was subsequently discharged from the service for 
physical disability. 

Sidney Close was born in Trumansburgh, New York, and was 
by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged 
twenty-four years, and was in the battle of Harper's Ferrv, 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and loth, 1862 ; he was detached 



Biographical Sketches. 443 

as teamster, June '20th, 1864; and as provost guard at Head- 
quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1804, and served in the 
latter capacity until the close of the war, when he was discharged 
with the Regiment. 

Stephen G. Cosiirx was born'in Ovid, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged twenty 
years, and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry,. Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he died of disease at Fnion 
Mills, Virginia, December 30th, 1862. 

J. M. Chamlers was born in Lenaway county, Michigan, and 
by occupation was a miller; he enlisted August 6th, 1802, aged 
twenty-one years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg ; he was wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylva- 
nia, July 3d, 1863, and rejoined the Regiment at Elk Run, Virginia, 
in August, 1863, participating in the battles of Auburn Ford, 
Bristow Station, Mine Run and Morton's Ford; he was detached 
as provost guard at Head-quarters, 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 
1864, and served in that capacity until the close of the war; was 
discharged with the Regiment. 

William Clark was born in England, and was by occupation 
a farmer; he enlisted July 2 "7th, 1802, aged twenty-three years, 
find participated in all of the battles of the Regiment, as follows: 
Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine 
Run, Morton's Ford, Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North 
Anna River, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Deep Bot- 
tom, Strawberry Plains, Ream's Station, Hatcher's Run, Boyd- 
ton Road, Sutherland's Station, Farmville, and Appomattox ; he 
was never sick, wounded or absent from the Company while in 
the service, and was discharged with the Regiment at the close 
of the war. 

William II. Ciikksmax was born in Covert, New York, and 
!»y occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 5th, ls<>2, aged 
wenty-six years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg; he was severely wounded in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 4th, lsc;?, and was subsequently discharged 
!'rom the service on account of wounds received in action. 



444 126th Regiment Xew York Volunteers. 

James M. Coxovek was born in Lodi, Xew York, and was a 
teamster by occupation ; he enlisted August loth, 1862, aged 
thirty-two years, and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; he was sent to general 
hospital, sick, from Union Mills, Virginia, in the winter of 1863, 
and was subsequently discharged from the service for physical 
disability 

George W Coxn was born in Ovid, Xew York, and In- 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted July 29th, 1862, aged forty 
years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg ; he was severely wounded in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863, and was subsequently discharged 
from the service on account of wounds received in action. 

Chaeles W Dey was born in Romulus, Xew York, and was 
by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged nine- 
teen years, and was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's 
Ford and the Wilderness ; he was slightly wounded in action on 
Maryland Heights, Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 
1862, and severely wounded at the battle of the Wilderness, May 
6th, 1864, and was subsequently discharged from the service on 
account of wounds received in action. 

Richakd C. Dimmick was born in DelaAvare county, Xew York, 
and was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, 
aged twenty-nine years, and participated in the battles of Har- 
per's Ferry and Gettysburg ; he was slightly wounded in action 
on Maryland Heights, Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 
1862, and severely, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863 ; 
he was discharged by order of Major- General Dix, February 19th, 
1864, on account of wounds received in action. 

Jesse L. Dimmick was born in Lodi, Xew York, and was In- 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged twenty- 
one years ; was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, Septem- 
ber 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and was discharged from the ser- 
vice, for physical disability, at Union Mills, Virginia, February 
13th, 1863. 



Biographical Sketches. 445 

Albert F. Dow was transferred from Company A while at 
Camp Swift, Geneva, before the organization of the Regiment ; 
his nativity, age and occupation are not given ; he participated 
in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn 
Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and Morton's Ford ; he was 
detached as provost guard at Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, April 
4th, 1864, and serving in that capacity until the termination of 
the Avar, he was discharged with the Regiment. 

Edwin K. Ellis was born in Danbury, Connecticut, and was 
by occupation a boatman; he enlisted July 31st, 1862, aged 
thirty-two years, and deserted at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, Sep- 
tember 14th, 1862. 

Lewis X. Everett was born in Chemung county, New York, 
and by occupation was a shoemaker ; he enlisted August 4th, 
1862, aged twenty-one years ; he was in action at Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and was dis- 
charged at Union Mills, Virginia, in the winter of 1863, for 
physical disability. 

Jonathan" T. Grant was born in Mecklenburgh, New York, 
and was by occupation a painter; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, 
aged twenty-six years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettys- 
burg, Pennsylvania, July 2d and 3d, 1 863 ; he was killed in action 
at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863. 

John R. Gltnderman was born in Lodi, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he was detached on duty 
in general hospital at Annapolis, Maryland, September 20th, 1862, 
and served in that capacity about two years, afterward deserting. 

Conhad Gunderman was born in Steuben county, New York, 
and was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, 
aged thirty-two years, and participated in the battle of Harper's 
Furry; lie was wounded in action on Maryland Heights, Harper's 
Kerry, Virginia, September 13th, 1862, resulting in the immediate 
loss of an arm, and was subsequently discharged at Annapolis, 
Maryland, on account of wounds received in action. 



446 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

Robert Gibson was born in Scotland, and by occupation was 
a laborer; he enlisted July 30th, 1862, aged thirty-six years, and 
was in action at Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bris- 
tow Station, Mine Run, and Morton's Ford ; he was detailed on 
duty at Company Head-quarters, May 3d, 1864, and returned to 
the ranks June 20th, 1864 ; afterward participated in the follow- 
ing battles : Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, Ream's Station, 
Hatcher's Run, Boydton Road, Sutherland's Station, Farmville, 
and Appomattox, and was discharged with the Regiment at the 
close of the war. 

Fkancis M. Haynes was born in Dayton, Indiana, and was a 
tailor by occupation; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged twenty- 
four years ; he participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, and 
deserted while the Regiment was at Chicago, Illinois; subse- 
quently returning, under the President's proclamation, he was 
wounded in action, battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864, and 
afterward discharged on account of wounds. 

Eugene Holton was born in Covert, New York, and was 
by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry, September 
13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettsburg, Pennsylvania, July 
2d and 3d, 1863; he was severely wounded in action at Gettys- 
burg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863, and was subsequently 
discharged from the service on account of wounds. 

Mathew Hamill was born in Ireland, and by occupation was 
a farmer ; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged thirty-six years, and 
was in action at Harper's Ferry, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 
1862, and Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d and 3d, 1863 ; he 
was severely wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
July 3d, 1863, and was subsequently discharged from the service 
on account of wounds. 

James B. Huff was born in Oakland, Michigan, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged twenty- 
five years, and participated in the following battles : Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, 
Morton's Ford, and the Wilderness ; lie was killed in action at 
the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864. 



Biographical Sketches. 447 

William IIerringtox was born in Locli, New York, and by 
jocupation Mas a carpenter; be enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged 
Aventy-one years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg; he was severely wounded in action at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863, and was subsequently 
lischarged on account of wounds. 

Daniel Hubbs was born at Halfmoon, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted July 29th, 1862, and partici- 
pated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, deserted while the Regi- 
ment was under parole at Chicago, Illinois. 

James F. Harris was born in Farmersville, Xew York, and 
was by occupation a merchant; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, 
aged twenty-one years, and participated in the following battles : 
Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, 
Mine Run, and Morton's Ford; he was detached as clerk, Head- 
quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th 1864, and serving in that 
capacity until the close of the war, was discharged with the 
Regiment. 

Lyman E. Jacobus. See Lymax E. Jacobus, Principal Musi- 
cian, page 396. 

George C. King was born in Covert, Xew York, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, age<l twenty- 
years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Septem- 
ber 13th, 14th and loth, 1*62, and Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
July 2d and 3d, 1863; he was killed in action, at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863. 

Geougk Kelley was born in Covert, Xew York, and was by 
upation a farmer; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged thirtv- 

e years, and was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, September 
13th, 14th and loth, 1*63, and Gettysburg, July 'j,l and 3d, 1*63; 
lie was killed in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 
1*63. 

Richard C. Lockiiakt was born in Schuyler county, New 
York, and by occupation was a miller ; he enlisted August 61 Ii, 
1*62, aged nineteen years, and participated in the battles of Har- 
per's Ferry and Gettysburg; he was severely wounded in action 



oc< 
on 



448 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863 ; sent to general hos- 
pital ; detached on duty, and serving in that capacity until the 
termination of the war, was discharged. 

John H. Luce was born in Elmira, New York, and was In- 
occupation a mason; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged twenty- 
seven years ; participating in the battle of Harper's Ferry, he was 
mortally wounded in action on Maryland Heights, September 
13th, 1862, and died from wounds September 14th, 1862. 

Alfred Martin was born in Ovid, New York, and by occupa- 
tion was a farmer; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged eighteen 
years ; was in the battle of Harper's Ferry ; sent to general hos- 
pital at Washington, November 30th, 1862, and was afterward 
discharged for physical disability. 

Alonzo W. Murphy was born in Covert, New York, and was 
by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and was in the battle of Harper's Ferry ; he 
was severely wounded in action on Maryland Heights, September 
13th, 1862, and died while on furlough at Covert, New York, 
October 27th, 1862. 

Samuel Mandeville was born in Sheldrake, New York, and 
was a farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and participated in the following battles : Har- 
per's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine 
Run and Morton's Ford ; he was detached as provost guard at 
Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and serving in 
that capacity until the close of the war, was discharged with the 
Regiment. 

George W Matthews was born in Hector, NeM- York, and 
was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged 
nineteen years ; was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and was discharged for dis- 
ability, near Union Mills, Virginia, in the winter of 1863. 

Myron C. Morse was transferred from Company A, while in 
camp at Geneva, in August, 1862 ; he participated in the battles 
of Harper's Ferry, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 3d and 4th, 1863, and was 
sent to general hospital, sick, in October, 1863. After recovery, 



Biographical Sketches. 449 

he was placed on duty in hospital, and serving in that capacity, 
until the close of the war, was discharged from the service. 

Henry Peteesox was born in Lodi, New York, and was a far- 
mer by occupation; he enlisted August 8th 1862, aged twenty-one 
years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg ; 
he was wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 
1863, and sent to general hospital; rejoining the Regiment at Elk 
Run, he participated in the battles of Auburn Ford, Bristow 
Station, and Mine Run ; in the winter of 1864 he was commis- 
sioned First Lieutenant in the 2d United States Colored Troops, 
afterward promoted to Captain, serving on Major-General Pope's 
staff, and was discharged at the termination of the war. 

Joshua B. Purcell was born in Romulus, New York, and was 
by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged 
twenty years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Gettysburg ; he was killed in action, at Gettysburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, July 3d, 1863. 

Augustixe S. Paerish Mas born in Ovid, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 1st, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and participating in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, was discharged for 
disability, near Union Mills, Virginia, in the winter of 1863. 

Feaxcis M. Parker was born in Plainfield, New Jersey, and 
was a carpenter by occupation; he enlisted July 29th, 1862, aged 
twenty-four years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg; he was severely wounded in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1*03, and was subsequently discharged 
<>n account of wounds. 

Andrew Peichard was born in Waterloo, New York, and In- 
occupation was a farmer ; he enlisted July 29th, aged twenty- 
one years, and was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, September 
13th, 14th and 15th, 1S02 ; in January, lS(i:5, he was detached 
on duty with the Ambulance Corps, and, serving in such detach- 
ment until the close of the Mar, was discharged witli the Hegi- 
ment. 

Ai.uickt \V PoiriKi:. Sec Second Lieutenant Alisert W. 
Poiitei:, page 3 ( J1. 



450 I'Oth Regiment New York Volunteers. 

John D. V Quick was born in Lodi, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged twenty- 
nine years, and participated in the following battles : Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Hristow Station, Mine Run, 
Morton's Ford, the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North 
Anna River, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Deep Bot 
torn, Strawberry Plains and Ream's Station, where he was 
wounded and taken prisoner, and subsequently died in rebel 
prison. 

John Roan was born in Geneva, New York, and by occupa- 
tion was a farmer ; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged eighteen 
yeai's, and was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, September 13th, 
14th and 15th, 1862 ; he died of disease in general hospital at 
Baltimore, Maryland, January 2d, 1863. 

Hexry H. Rumsey was born in Bradford, New York, and was 
by occupation a moulder; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg ; he was severely wounded in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863, and subsequently discharged from 
the service on account of wounds. 

Francis M. Rappleye was born in Covert, New York, and In- 
occupation was a carpenter ; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged 
twenty-three years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg ; in the winter of 1864, he was detached 
on duty with Brigade band, and serving in that capacity until 
the termination of the war, he was discharged with the Regiment. 

Cedric Rappleye was born in Covert, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged twenty- 
four years, and participated in the following battles: Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run 
and Morton's Ford; he was wounded in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1803, was appointed Corporal, and subse- 
quently promoted to Sergeant, April 4th, 1864; he was detached 
with provost guard at Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, and 
serving in that capacity until the close of the war, he was 
discharged with the Resriment. 



BiocRAi'iiiCAL Sketches. 451 

Peter YV Rappleye was born in Ovid, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; lie enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged 
twenty-four years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg; he was wounded in action on Maryland 
Heights, Harper's Ferry, September 13th, 1862, and also at Get- 
tysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1S63; on the 30th of August, 
18(34, he was transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps; and serv- 
ing in that capacity until the close of the war, was discharged 
from the service. 

Harrison Rappleye was born in Covert, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation; he enlisted August oth, 1862, aged forty- 
four years, and was in action in the following battles : Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and 
Morton's Ford; on the 4th of April, 1864, he was detached with 
provost guard at Head-quarters, 2d Army 'Corps; and serving in 
that capacity until the termination of the war, was discharged 
with the Regiment. 

William W Rappleye was born in Covert, New York, and 
was by occupation a marine ; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged 
forty-three years, and participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he was subsequently 
detailed on duty as Company cook, and serving in that capacity 
except when absent sick, until the close of the war, he was dis- 
charged with the Regiment. 

Harrison Randolph was born in Spencer, New York, and 
was a farmer by occupation; he enlisted August 5th, 1802, aged 
twenty-seven years, and was in the following battles: Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, 
and Morton's Ford; he was detached with provost guard at 
Mead-quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and, serving with 
the detachment until the close of the war, was discharged with 
the Regiment. 

GicowuE W Smith was born in Romulus, New York, and by 
occupation was a blacksmith; he enlisted August 4th, 1802, 
aged eighteen years, and participated in the following battles: 
Harper's Ferrv, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine 
Run, Morton's Ford, the "Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, 

2!> 



452 126th Regiment JS'ew York Volunteer s. 

North Anna River, Cold Harbor and Petersburg; he was severely 
wounded in action at Petersburg, Virginia, June 16th, 1864, and 
was discharged from the service on account of wounds, February 
22d, 1865. 

Clarksox Smith was born in Enfield, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged twenty 
years, and was in the following battles: Harper's Ferry, Gettys- 
burg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, 
the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna River, 
Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor and Petersburg ; he was mortally 
wounded in action in front of Petersburg, Virginia, June 16th, 
1864, and died of wounds at City Point, Virginia, June 27th, 
1864. 

William Stewart was born in Ovid, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a printer ; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged twenty 
years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, September 13th, 
14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 
1863 ; he was mortally wounded in action at Gettysburg, Penn- 
sylvania, July 2d, 1863, and died in hospital from wounds, Aug- 
ust 27th, 1863. 

Hudson R. Swick was born in Covert, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged twenty 
years, and participated in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's 
Ford, the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna 
River, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor and Petersburg ; he was 
severely wounded in action in front of Petersburg, Virginia, 
June 16th, 1864, and was subsequently discharged from the ser- 
vice on account of wounds. 

Simeox Sayler was born in Varick, New York, and was a 
tailor by occupation; he enlisted July 30th, 1862, aged twenty 
six years, and was in action in the following battles : Harper's 
Ferrv, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, 
Morton's Ford, the Wilderness, Po River, and Spottsylvania ; he 
was missing in action at Spottsylvania, Virginia, May 12th, 1864, 
and subsequently died in rebel prison, at Florence, South Caro- 
lina. 



Biographical Sketches. 453 

Michael E. Stout was Lorn in Covert New York, and by 
occupation was an engineer; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged 
twenty-eight years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, July 
2d, 3d and 4th, 1863. In the winter of 1864 he was detached on 
duty with the Brigade band, and served in that capacity until the 
termination of the war, and was discharged with the Regiment. 

Johx C. Scott Avas born in Ohio, and was a farmer by occu- 
pation ; he enlisted July 29th, 1862, aged eighteen years, and 
was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg ; he was 
severely wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 
3d, 1863, and Avas absent on account of wounds, until the winter 
of 1864; he was detached with provost guard, Head-quarters 2d 
Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and serving in that capacity until 
the close of the Avar, was discharged with the Regiment. 

Bexxett L. Treadavell was born in CoA r ert, New York, and 
was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged 
tAventy-three years, and participated in the following battles : 
Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine 
Run and Morton's Ford ; he was detached with provost guard at 
Head-quarters, 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and serving 
in that capacity until the termination of the Avar, was discharged 
with the Regiment. 

Elisiia D. Vaughn Avas born in Woodstock, Vermont, and 
was by occupation a photographer; he enlisted August 15th, 
1862, aged tAventy-four years, Avas in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg, and Avas killed in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863. 

Francis S. Van Horn was born in Covert, New York, and by 
occupation was a mason; he enlisted August 12th, 1862, and 
participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry ; he deserted while 
the Regiment Avas at Chicago, Illinois, in the autumn of 1862. 

Menaoh C. Van Lkav Avas born in Lodi, New York, and Avas a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged twenty- 
one years, and was in the following battles: Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, and BristoAv Station; in the fall of 
J si;:; he was commissioned and mustered as First Lieutenant 2d 



454 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

United States Colored Cavalry, and was killed in action, near 
Norfolk, Virginia, in the spring of 1864. 

Thomas M. Woodwoeth was born in Ovid, New York, and 
by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged 
twenty-two years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg; he was severely wounded in action at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863, and was subsequently 
discharged from the service on account of wounds. 

William N. Wolvertox was born in Rensselaer, New York, 
and was a farmer by occupation; he enlisted July 30th, 1862, 
and, participating in the battle of Harper's Ferry, September 
13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, was discharged, on account of disease, 
at Chicago, Illinois, November 15th, 1862. 

Irving B. Wilson was born in Ovid, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a farmer; he enlisted August 2d, 1862, and partici- 
pating in the battle of Harper's Ferry was wounded, and dis- 
charged for disability at Washington, District of Columbia, 
January 28th, 1863. 

Almon H. Wilson Avas born in Ovid, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged twenty- 
six years, and participating in the battle of Harper's Ferry, was 
wounded in the action on Maryland Heights, September 13th, 
1862 ; rejoining the Regiment, he was with it in all the sub- 
sequent battles of the war, as follows : Gettysburg, Auburn 
Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, the Wilderness, 
Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna River, Tolopotomoy, Cold 
Harbor, Petersburg, Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, Ream's 
Station, Boydton Road, Sutherland's Station, Farmville and 
Appomattox Court-house ; he Avas discharged with the Regi- 
ment. 

Alexander B. Wvcoff was born in Varick, New York, and 
by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and was in the following battles ; Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, 
Morton's Ford, the Wilderness and Po River, where he was 
severely wounded May 10th, 1864; rejoining the Regiment, he 
participated in the battles of Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains 



Biographical Sketches. 455 

and Ream's Station ; he was wounded and taken prisoner in 
action at Ream's Station, Virginia, August 25th, 1864; was subse- 
quently exchanged, and died at Baltimore, Maryland, April 2d, 
1865 

Recruits. 

Adelbert J. Dow, Myron C. Mooke, Isaac H. Miller, 
George B. Scott, Gilbert Smith. 

Xo account of the military history of these soldiers is given in 
the records of the Regiment, and the writer has been unable to 
learn anything definite in reference to them. 



456 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 



COMPANY D 



Company D. was raised in the western part of Ontario county,, 
being recruited by its commissioned officers, assisted by many of 
the enlisted men. The first man was enlisted July 22d, 1862, and 
the Company organization was dated August 9th, 1862. 

Henry B. Gibson, Esq., of Canandaigua, after the commence- 
ment of recruiting for the 126th Regiment New York Volunteers, 
offered a premium of two hundred dollars to be paid to the first 
Company which should be recruited in Ontario county for this 
Regiment. Company D, being the first recruited, received the 
premium, upon its organization. 

The following were the original line officers of the Company : 

Philo D. Phillips, Captain. 

Charles A. Richardson, First Lieutenant. 

Spencer F. Lincoln, Second Lieutenant. 

Non-commissioned Officers. 
John B. Geddis. See Captain John B. Geddis, page 370. 

Edward E. Fairchild was born in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. 
and by occupation was a clerk; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and was appointed Sergeant upon the organi- 
zation of the Company ; he participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg, and was discharged November 18th, 1863, 
by Special Order No. 512, War Department, to enable him to 
accept appointment as Second Lieutenant 9th TJnited States Col- 
ored Troops ; he was promoted to First Lieutenant in the same 
Regiment, 13th October, 1864, and appointed Adjutant; he par- 
ticipated in the following battles while with the colored troops : 
Deep Bottom Chapin's Farm, Darbytown Road and second Fair 
Oaks ; and was mustered out with his Regiment, NoA'ember 26th, 
1866. 

Ira Hart Wilder. See Captain Ira Hart Wilder, page 378, 



Biographical Sketches. 457 

Martin Pierce was born in Lima, New York, and was a 
Wilder by occupation ; he enlisted August 4th, 1802, aged twenty- 
two years, and was appointed Sergeant ; he was promoted to 
First Sergeant, November 2 7th, 1802; was in the battles of 
Harper's Ferry, Auburn Ford, and Bristow Station, and was 
severely wounded in action, at Bristow Station, Virginia, October 
14th, 1803 ; lie was discharged, on account of wounds received in 
action, May 20th, 1804. Previous to joining the Regiment in 
1802, Sergeant Pierce enlisted in the 14th Missouri Infantry, and 
was appointed First Sergeant, serving in that capacity under 
Colonel Mulligax, at Lexington, Missouri; was at that place at 
the time of its surrender, and was taken prisoner, paroled and 
exchanged before re-entering the service. 

Edwix Tyler was born in Xaples, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted July 31st, 1862, aged twenty- 
four years, and was appointed Sergeant upon the organization of 
the Company ; he was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, July 2d and 3d, 1863, and Avas killed in action at Gettys- 
burg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863. 

Darius C. Sackett was born in Canandaigua, New York, and 
was by occupation a student ; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged 
twenty-two years ; lie participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, September 13th, 1862 ; was severely wounded in action 
on Maryland Heights, Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 
1862, and discharged, on account of wounds received in action, 
at Annapolis, Maryland, November 20th, 1802. 

Milo 11. Hoi-pee. See First Lieutenant Milo IT. Hopper, 

page 380. 

IIi:\i:v M. Lek. See First Lieutenant Hexiiy M. Lee, page 
383. 

Charles Gaue. See First Lieutenant Charles Gace, page 

;iso. 

Gilhert NY Peck was born in Biclimond, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 4th, 1802, aged 
twentv-ono vears, ami was appointed Corporal; he was in the 



458 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, and Bristow 
Station ; was wounded and taken prisoner in action at Bristow 
Station, Virginia, October 14th, 1863, and was in rebel prisons on 
Belle Island, in Richmond, Charleston and Florence; he was 
afterwards exchanged, and discharged at Elmira, New York, May 
31st, 1865. 

Henry Mattoon was born at Horseheads, Chemung county, 
New York, and was a farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 
4th, 1862, and was appointed Corporal upon the organization of 
the Regiment ; he was in action at Harper's Ferry and Gettys- 
burg ; was severely wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, July 3d, 1863, while carrying the colors of the Regiment, 
in the charge made by the enemy upon Cemetery Hill ; he was 
pi-omoted to Sergeant, November 18th, 1863; transferred to the 
Veteran Reserve Corps, February 14th, 1864, and was discharged 
from the service, July 7th, 1865. 

Charles "VV Watkins. See Second Lieutenant Charles W 
vV atkins, page 392. 

Hollister N. Grimes was born in Marcellus, New York, and 
by occupation was a clerk; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged 
twenty years, and was appointed Corporal upon the organization 
of the Company ; he was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Vir- 
ginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and was discharged 
for disability, January 8th, 1864. 

Musicians. 

Carter W Dunham was born in Bristol, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted July 29th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and deserted October 8th, 1862, at Chicago, 
Illinois. 

Charles A. Garlinghouse. See Second Lieutenant Charles 
A. GARLiNtrHOusE, page 389. 

Privates. 

Albert S. Andrews. See Sergeant-Major Albert S. Andrews, 
page 393. 



Biographical Sketches. 459 

Thomas Bakxett was born in England, and was a farmer by 
occupation ; lie enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged twenty-three 
years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettys- 
burg, Auburn Ford and Bristow Station ; he was wounded in 
action on Maryland Heights, Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 
13th, 1862, and was taken prisoner in action at Bristow Station, 
Virginia, October 14th, 1863 ; he was in rebel prisons at Belle 
Island and Andersonville ; was subsequently exchanged, and 
discharged at Annapolis, Maryland, January 28th, 1865. 

Fernando Beers was born in Bristol, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged 
twenty-three years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford and Bristow Station, and was 
discharged at "Washington, District Columbia, May 22d, 1865. 

Henry W Bradt was born at Clifton Springs, New York, and 
by occupation was a clerk; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Viginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; he was transferred to the 
Veteran Reserve Corps, and subsequently enlisted in the same 
Corps, and was discharged from the service at the close of the 
war. 



William B. Buaxdo was born in Gorham, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer ; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Gettys- 
burg, the Wilderness, and Po River; he was wounded and 
taken prisoner at Po River, May loth, 1864, and subsequently 
dicd in rebel prison, at Andersonville, Georgia. 



:is a 



Caul Bekxd was born in Germany, and by occupation w: 
farmer; he enlisted August 2d, 1862, aged thirty-six years ; was 
in action at Harper's Ferry, and deserted September lsth, 1862. 



■cii- 



Joii.v Brume was born in England, and was a farmer by <x 
pation ; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged twenty-one years ; he 
was in the battles of Harper's Ferry Virginia, September 13th, 
14th and 15th, 18(12, and Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 
1863, and was killed in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 
2d, lsc,:;. 



460 12f>TH REantENT Xew York Volunteers. 

Daniel Butler was born in Amsterdam, New York, and In- 
occupation was a farmer; lie enlisted July 31st, 1862, aged 
twenty-five years ; he was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; was detailed with Brigade 
Pioneers, January 12th, 1863, and served in that capacity until 
the reorganization of the army in the spring of 1804, when he was 
returned to his Company ; he participated in the battles of the 
Wilderness and Po River ; was taken prisoner in action at Po 
River, Virginia, May 10th, 1864, and died in rebel prison at 
Andersonville, Georgia, September 19th, 1864. 

James Call was born in New Hampshire, and by occupation 
was a blacksmith; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged twenty-five 
years ; was in action at Harper's Ferry, and deserted at Chicago. 
Illinois, October 2d, 1862. 

Oliver C. Castle was born in Canandaigua, New York, and 
Avas a farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 
twenty-six years ; participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and was dis- 
charged, for disability, at Alexandria, May 2d, 1863. 

Michael Colyix was born in Ireland, and by occupation was 
a harness maker; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged twenty-four 
years ; was in action at Harper's Ferry, and deserted at Monocacy, 
Maryland, September 18th, 1862. 

John Cloheoy was born in Canandaigua, New York, and bv 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged 
twenty one years ; participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Gettysburg, and was wounded in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863 ; he was transferred to the Veteran 
Reserve Corps, October 17th, 1864, and was discharged from the 
service at Trenton, New Jersey, July 6th, 1805. 

Truman B. Comstock was born in Gorham, New York, and 
was a farmer by occupation; he enlisted July 31st, 1802, aged 
twenty four years; he was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Vir- 
ginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1862; and was killed in action at Gettys- 
burg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863. 



() 



Biographical Sketches. 461 

Ciiaki.es C. Ckandall was born in Naples, New York, and by 
ccupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged 
twenty-seven years; participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Gettysburg, and was killed in action at Gettysburg, Penn- 
sylvania, July 3d, 1863. 

William R. Chambers was born in Victor, New York, and by 
occupation was a teacher; lie enlisted August 26th, 1862, aged 
twenty-six years; he was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Vir- 
ginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863, and was severely wounded in action 
at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863 ; he rejoined the 
Regiment, August 26th, 1864, and participated in the battles and 
skirmishes near Petersburg, Virginia, during the fall of 1864 and 
winter of 1865; he was wounded in action at Boydton Road, 
March 31st, 1865, but rejoined the army in May, 1865, and was 
discharged from the service with the Regiment, at the close of 
the war. 

Albert S. Daniels was born in Richmond, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13tli, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Get- 
tysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 3d and 4th, 1863 ; he was detailed 
December 5th, 1863, as Surgeon's orderly, and served in that 
capacity until the close of the war, accompanying the army in 
the campaign of 1^64 and 1805, and was discharged with the 
Regiment. 

Orman Dickinson was born in Naples, New York, and was a 
laborer by occupation ; he enlisted August 5th, 1H62, aged thirty- 
six years, and was in the battle of Harper's Ferry; he was 
severely wounded in action on Mankind Heights, Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 13th, 1862, and was discharged at Annapolis, 
Maryland, January 7th, ls<i3, on account of wounds received in 
action. 

William Di-:tti;k was born in Hopewell, New York, and by 
occupation was a carpenter; he enlisted August 7th, Is02, aged 
twenty-seven years; was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg; he deserted near Two Taverns. Pennsylvania, July 
7th, 1SC.3. 



4C/2 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

Aaron C. Doyle was born in Bristol, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer ; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged twenty- 
eight years ; was in action at Harper's Ferry, and deserted at 
Chicago, Illinois, October 20th, 1862. 

Henry H. Doolittle was born in Rutland, New York, and 
was a farmer by occupation; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged 
forty-three years ; was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and was discharged for 
disability, at Bedloe's Island, New York, March 31st, 1863. 

George II. Doee was born in England, and was by occupation 
a nurseryman ; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged eighteen years ; 
he was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg and Auburn 
Ford, and was wounded in action at Auburn Ford, Virginia, 
October 14th, 1863; he was appointed Corporal, to date from 
October 14th, 1863, and subsequently promoted to Sergeant; he 
afterward participated in the following battles : Morton's Ford, 
the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna River, 
Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Deep Bottom, Straw- 
berry Plains, and Ream's Station ; he Avas detailed as Ordnance 
Sergeant, 3d Brigade, 1st Division, 2d Army Corps, November 
18th, 1864, and served in that capacity until the close of the war; 
in the winter of 1865 he was presented with a " medal of honor" 
by Major-General Meade, commanding the Army of the Potomac, 
in pursuance to an act of Congress, for capturing a rebel flag, at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, tTuly 3d, 1863; he was discharged 
with the Regiment. 

Mark Dunham was born in Camden, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged twenty 
years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Get- 
tysbiirg ; he was shot through the lungs by a minnie ball, in 
action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863, and was dis- 
charged on account of wounds received in action, at Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, September 26th, 1863. 

Frederick Ebert was born in Gorham, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted July 30th, 1862, and par- 
ticipated in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Morton's Ford and the Wilderness; he was wounded in action on 
Maryland Heights, Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 



Biographical Sketches. 463 

1862; at Gettysburg, Pennsylvnaia, July 3d, 1803; and at the 
Wilderness, May 6th, lsi>4; subsequently, he was transferred to 
the Veteran Reserve Corps, and discharged from the service at 
the close of the war. 

Barber Eldrid<;k was born in Naples, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer ; he enlisted July 29th, 1862, aged twenty- 
five years ; was in the battles of Harpei*'s Ferry, Virginia, Sep- 
tember 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, Pennslvania, 
July 2d, 3d and 4th, 1863 ; he was wounded in action at Gettys- 
burg, Pennsylvania, July 4th 1863 ; rejoining the Regiment, March 
3d, 1864, he participated in the battle of the Wilderness, and was 
wounded May 6th, 1864 ; he rejoined the Regiment at Cold Har- 
bor, Virginia, June 10th, 1864, and was wounded again at Peters- 
burg, Virginia, June 16th, 1864; he rejoined the Regiment in 
January, 1865, and was wounded in action the fourth time on the 
25th of March, 1865, at the left of Petersburg; he again joined 
the Regiment and was discharged with it at the close of the war. 

Orlaxdo Evans Avas born in Northumberland, Ncav York, and 
was a farmer by occupation; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged 
twenty-five years ; Avas in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and died of disease in Regi- 
mental Hospital, at camp near Union Mills, Virginia, January 
17th, 1863. 

Charles W Ford was born in Yates county, New York, and 
was by occupation a carpenter; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, 
aged thirty-seven years, and participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry ; he Avas Avounded in action upon Maryland Heights, Sep- 
tember 13th, 18t)2, by a minnie ball, through the lungs, and died 
of wounds received in action, in hospital at Annapolis, Maryland, 
October 26th, 1802. 

Kuas'its G. Field was born in Canandaigua, New York, and 
by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged 
twenty-eight years; participated in the battles of Harper's Kerry, 
Auburn Ford and llristovv Station, and was killed inaction at 
Hristow Station, October 14th, 1K03. 

Gkokoh W Fi'llei; was born in Livingston count}', New 
York, and bv occupation Avas a farmer; he enlisted August 7th, 



464 IMth Regiment Xew York Volunteers. 

1862, aged twenty-five years, and was in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Deep Bottom, Strawberry 
Plains, and Ream's Station ; he was killed in action at Ream's 
Station, Virginia, August 25th, 1864. 

John Fitzpatrick was born in Port Hope, Canada West ; 
enlisted August 2d, 1862 ; and deserted while in camp at Geneva, 
August 20th, 1862. 

Hugh Giblix was born in Ireland, and by occupation was a 
farmer; he enlisted August 4th, 1863, aged twenty-three years, 
and participated in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Auburn 
Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and Morton's Ford; he was 
detached with provost guard at Head-quarter^ 2d Army Corps, 
April 4th, 1864, and served in such capacity until the close of the 
war, when he was discharged with the Regiment. 

Horace Gillett was born in Naples, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged twenty- 
seven years ; he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, and Mor- 
ton's Ford ; he was detached -with provost guard at Head-quarters 
2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and served in that capacity 
until the close of the war, when he was discharged with the 
Regiment. 

Solomon Green was born in Gorham, Xew York, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted July 31st, 1862, aged twenty- 
two years ; w T as in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 
13th, 14th, and 15th, 1862 ; died in hospital camp, near Union Mills, 
Virginia, January 13th, 1*63. 

John Goodrich was born in Naples, New York, and was In- 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged twenty- 
seven years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Gettysburg ; he was wounded in action at Gettysburg, Penn- 
sylvania, July 2d, 1863 ; transferred to the Veteran Reserve 
Corps August 30th, 1 864, and was discharged from the service 
July 7th, 1865. 

John C. Haneahan was born in Ireland, and by orcupatiou 
was a farmer; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged twenty-one 
years, and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 



Biographical Sketches. 465 

September l;ith, 14th and 15th, 1802 ; he was detailed June 25th, 
1803, in Regimental Quartermaster's Department, and subse- 
quently transferred to Brigade Quartermaster's Department, serv- 
ing as wagon master, and accompanying the Army in all its cam- 
paigns ; he was discharged with the Regiment at the close of the 
war. 

De< atee A. Hedgee was born in Italy, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg ; he was wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, July 2d, 1803, and discharged on account of wounds 
received in action, January 11th, 1864. 

John W Heard was born in Canada West, and by occupation 
was a shoemaker; he enlisted July 23d, 1862, aged twenty-four 
years ; was in action at Harper's Ferry, and deserted at Chicago, 
Illinois, October 11th, 1862. 

Alvix Huelrutt was born in Berkshire, Vermont ; lie enlisted 
July 28th, 1862, aged thirty-six years; participated in the battle 
of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th, and 15th, 
1802, and was discharged for disability, at Chicago, Illinois. 

Barrett S. lit xt was born in West Bloomfield, New York, 
and was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 2d, 1802, 
aged eighteen years ; participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and was dis- 
charged for disability, at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, November 
17th, 1802. 

Oi.ivki; Johnson was born in Bristol, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a farmer; he enlisted August 8th, 1802, aged twenty- 
seven years ; was in action at Harper's Ferry, and deserted at 
Chicago, Illinois, October 1-4-th, lso2. 

(.tEokue 1). Johnson was born in Naples, New York, and was 
a farmer bv occupation ; he enlisted August 9th, 1802, aged 
thirty-two years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg; lie was wounded in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 4th, lsa>3, but rejoined the Regiment in the 
winter of lso,4, and was again wounded in the battle of the 



466 H'Otb Regiment JS'ew York Volunteers. 

Wilderness, May 6th, 1864; he rejoined the Regiment September 
J 2th, 1.S64, and participated in the battles resulting in the cap- 
ture of Petersburg in the spring of 1865; he was wounded in 
action at Sutherland's Station, Southside railroad, Virginia, April 
2d, 1865; and was discharged at Washington, District of Colum- 
bia, June 6th, 1865. 

Marc us E. Knowles was born in Canandaigua, New York, and 
was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years ; was in action at Harper's Ferry, and deserted 
at Chicago, Illinois, October 7th, 1862. 

William T. Lamport was born in Gorham, New York, and 
by occupation was a' farmer; he enlisted July 30th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years ; he participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; and died of 
disease in regimental hospital, camp near Union Mills, Virginia, 
December 18th, 1862. 

Hosea Lewis was born in Gorham, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged twenty- 
two years ; and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and loth, 1862, and Gettysburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, July 2d, 1863; he was mortally wounded in action at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863; he died of wounds 
received in action in field hospital, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
July 6th, 1863. 

Octavus C. Lyon was born in Naples, New York, and at the 
time of entering the service was a student ; he enlisted August 
7th, 1862, aged twenty years, and participated in the battles of 
Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg ; he was severely Avounded in 
action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 4th, 1863 ; transferred 
to the Veteran Reserve Corps, Februray 15th, 1864, and was 
discharged at Elmira, New York, July 14th, 1865. 

Edward T. Mathewson was born in Walworth, New York, 
and by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 2d, 1862, 
aged eighteen years ; participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Gettysburg, and was wounded in action on Maryland Heights, 
Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 1862; he was taken 
prisoner while on the march near White Plains, Virginia, July 



Biograpeical Sketches. 467 

25th, 18G3, and died in rebel prison on Belle Island, near Rich- 
mond, Virginia, November 14th, 1863. 

Sandford B. Mead was born in Pennsylvania, and was by 
occupation a farmer ; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged twenty- 
eight years, and was in action in the battles of Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, and Mor- 
ton's Ford ; he was detailed with provost guard at Head-quarters, 
2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and served in that capacity 
until the close of the war, when he was discharged with the 
Regiment. 

Byron J. Mentis e was born in Gorham, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years ; participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg, and was discharged on account of physical disability, 
February 26th, 1864. 

Hokton McMillan was born in Canandaigua, New York, and 
was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted July 23d 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and was in action in the following battles ; Har- 
per's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine 
Run, Morton's Ford, the Wilderness, Po River, and Spottsylva- 
nia ; he was severely wounded in action at Spottsylvania, May 
12th, 1864, but subsequently rejoined the Regiment and was 
appointed Corporal; he was mustered out as supernumerary, upon 
the consolidation of the Regiment, December 25th, 1864. 

George A. Mitchell was born in Avon, New York, and was 
a farmer by occupation; he enlisted July 18th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Gettysburg ; he was detached with provost guard at Head- 
quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and served in that 
capacity until the close of the war, when he was discharged with 
the Regiment. 

Anorriu s F. Milks was born in Canandaigua, New York, and 
was by occupation a printer; he enlisted July 30th, 1862, aged 
twenty-five, vears, and was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he was detailed 
on duty in regimental hospital while at Chicago, Illinois, and 
subsequently transferred t<> the division hospital, 1st Division 

3(1 



468 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

2d Army Corps; he served in such capacity until the close 
of the war, when he was discharged with the Regiment. 

Norman N. Monroe was born in Sennet, New York, and by- 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged 
thirty-five years ; was in action at Harper's Ferry, and deserted 
at Chicago, Illinois, November 20th, 1862. 

Martin L. Nittt was born in Canandaigua, New \ r ork, and 
was a farmer by occupation; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he was detailed in ambu- 
lance department January 19th, 1863, and was taken prisoner 
while on the march, near White Plains, Virginia, July 26th, 1863 ; 
he died in rebel prison at Andersonville, Georgia, June 27th, 
1864. 

Edgar Oatman was born in East Bloomfleld, New York, and 
by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted July 22d, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Gettysburg ; he was severely wounded in action at Gettys- 
burg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863, and was absent on light duty, 
on account of wounds received in action, until the close of the 
war; he was discharged at Elmira, New York, June 27th, 1865. 

Sylvester Oatman was born in East Bloomfield, New York, 
and was by occirpation a farmer; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, 
aged twenty-one years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Gettysburg ; he was severely wounded in action at Gettys- 
burg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863, and was absent on account of 
wounds until the close of the war. 

Dennis O'Neil was born in East Bloomfield, New York, and 
by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged 
twenty three years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Vir- 
ginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he was discharged 
for disability at Chicago, Illinois, in December, 1863. 

Hf.rbert C. Philbrick was born in Massachusetts, and was by 
occupation a clerk; he enlisted July 31st, 1862, aged eighteen 
years, and participated in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, and Mor- 
ton's Ford ; he was detached as provost guard at Head-quarters, 



Biographical Sketches. 469 

2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and served in such capacity until 
the close of the war, when he was discharged with the Regiment. 

James Poli.an was born in Scotland, and by occupation was a 
farmer; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged twenty-six years, 
and was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 
13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he was killed in action on Bolivar 
Heights, Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 15th, 1862. 

Robert T. Porter was born in Naples, New York, and by 
occupation was a builder; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged 
twenty-seven years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg ; he was severely wounded in action at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 4th, 1863, and discharged at 
Fort Schuyler, New York, December 15th, 1863, on account of 
wounds received in action. 

Stephen E. Prouty was born in Canandaigua, New York, 
and was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, 
aged twenty-three years, and participated in the battles of Har- 
per's Ferry, Gettysburg and Auburn Ford ; he was severely 
wounded at Auburn Ford, Virginia, October 14th, 1863 ; he died 
of wounds received in action, in hospital at Alexandria, Virginia, 
November 12th, 1863. 

George E. Raymond was born in Naples, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 
twenty-two years ; participated in the battle at Harper's Ferry y 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; and was dis- 
charged at Chicago, Illinois, December, 1H62. 

David L. Ross was born in South Bristol, New York, and was 
by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 7th, 1H02 ; was 
taken sick on arrival at Harper's Ferry; sent to general hospital 
and detached on duty as carpenter at Camp Parole, Annapolis, 
Maryland, where he remained until the winter of 1864, when he 
rejoined the Regiment; he participated in the battle of Morton's 
Ford, February 6th, 1864; was detached oti duty with provost, 
guard at Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and 
served in the detachment until the close of the \v:ir; he was dis 
charged with the Regiment. 



470 126 th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

George I. Rose was born in Bethany, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a farmer; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged twenty- 
one years ; participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg 
and Auburn Ford ; he was wounded in action at Auburn Ford, 
Virginia, October 14th, 1863, but rejoined the Regiment in the 
spring of 1864, and was in the battles of the Wilderness, Po River, 
Spottsylvania, North Anna River, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, and 
Petersburg, and was again wounded in action near Petersburg, 
Virginia, June 22d, 1864; he was promoted to Sergeant, Novem- 
ber 1st, 1864, transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, Decem- 
ber loth, 1864, and discharged from the service, at Washington, 
District of Columbia, June 28th, 1865. 

Wesley D. Robinson was born in Spring water, New York, 
and was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted July 23d, 1862, aged 
nineteen years, and jaarticipated in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Gettysburg, and was wounded in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863; he was transferred to the Veteran 
Reserve Corps, January 16th, 1864, and discharged from the ser- 
vice, at Providence, Rhode Island, August 22d, 1865. 

John D. Rivers was born at Rochester, New York, and by 
occupation was a teacher; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and participated in the battles of Harper's- 
Ferry and Gettysburg ; he was transferred to the Veteran Reserve 
Corps September 12th, 1864, and detailed as clerk in the Provost 
Marshal General's office at Washington, District of Columbia ; he 
was discharged at Washington, District of Columbia, August 22d, 
1865. 

Jepther Z. Sabin was born in Naples, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged twenty- 
four years ; participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg, and was wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, July 2d, 1863; he rejoined the Regiment February 6th, 
1864, and was wounded and taken prisoner in the battle of the 
Wilderness, May 6th, 1864 ; he was afterward exchanged, and dis- 
charged from the service near the close of the war. 

James A. Stall was born in Gorham, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 



Biographical Sketches. 471 

nineteen years ; participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and was discharged for 
disability, October 3d, 1863. 

George O. Stark was born in Gorham, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged eighteen 
years, and participated in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's 
Ford, and the Wilderness ; he was mortally wounded in the 
battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864, and died of w r ounds 
received in action, at Washington, District Columbia, June 5th, 
1864. 

George S. Steele was born in East Bloomfield, New York, 
and was a farmer by occupation; he enlisted July 25th, 1862, 
aged nineteen years, and participated in the following battles : 
Harper's Ferry, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Mor- 
ton's Ford, the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna 
River, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, and Petersburg ; he was mor- 
tally wounded in action, near Petersburg, Virginia, June 25th, 
1864, and died, from wounds received in action, at Washington, 
District of Columbia, July 28th, 1864. 

William L. Shepherd was born in Canadice, New York, and 
was by occupation a farmer ; he enlisted August 2d, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
September 13th, 1862; he was severely wounded in action, on 
Maryland Heights, Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 
1802 ; was transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, August 1st, 
1863, and discharged from the service at the close of the war. 

Reuiien Sfeacee wiis born in Canandaigua, New York, and 
by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted July 20th, 1862, aged 
nineteen years ; participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Vir- 
ginia, September l-itli, 14th and 15th, IS62, and died of disease 
at Chicago, Illinois, October 22d, 18C.2. 

Jeremiah Smith was born in Ontario county, New York, 
and was bv occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, 
ajfed twenty-four years, and participated in the battle of Har- 
per's Ferrv, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1«62; lie 
/lied of disease at Chicago, Illinois, October 25th, 186.'. 



472 120tb Regiment New York Volunteers. 

Charles G. Smith was born in Canandaigua, New York, and 
by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged 
twenty-seven years ; participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry,. 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th; 1862, and died of dis- 
ease in post hospital at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 26th r 
1862. 

William Snyder was born in Gorham, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged twenty- 
two years ; was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg, 
and was severely wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
July 2d, 1863; he rejoined the Regiment December 9th, 1863, 
and participated in the following battles : Morton's Ford, the- 
Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna River, Tolo- 
potomoy, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Hatcher's Run, Boydton 
Road, Southside Railroad, and Appomattox Court-house ; he 
was appointed First Sergeant, December 28th, 1864, and dis- 
charged with the Regimeut at the close of the war. 

Solomon C. Tenny was born in Naples, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged 
twenty-four years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, 
and Morton's Ford; he was detached with provost guard at 
Head-quarters, 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and served in 
that capacity until May 29th, 1865, when he was discharged to 
accept appointment as Second Lieutenant of United States Col- 
ored Troops ; subsequently he was discharged from the service. 

William S. Townsend was born in Canandaigua, New York r 
and was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, 
aged eighteen years ; was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; and discharged for dis- 
ability at Elmira, New York, Februay 14th, 1863. 

James A. Tyler was born in Naples, New York, and by occu- 
pation a farmer; he enlisted July 25th, 1862, aged thirty-two 
years ; participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; and died of disease in the 
post hospital at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 20th T 
1862. 



Biographical Sketches. 473 

Hknky Tuukiiek was born in Springwater, New York, by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years ; was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1802, and died of disease in 
hospital camp, near Union Mills, Virginia, February 10th, 1863. 

Edward R. Winegar was born in Union, New York, and by 
occupation was a book-keeper; he enlisted July 20th, 1862, aged 
thirty-one years, and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he was detached 
October 1st, 1862, as acting hospital steward, in Brigade hospital 
and was on duty in that capacity until March 31st, 1864, when 
he was discharged from the service, to accept the appointment of 
hospital steward, United States Army, in which capacity he 
served until the close of the war, when he was discharged. 



l ? 



Andrew J. Wilson was born in Gorham, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he was transferred to the 
Veteran Reserve Corps, September 30th, 1803, and discharged 
from the service at the close of the war. 

Henry W Willson Mas born in Canandaigua, New York, 
and was a farmer by occupation; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, 
aged thirty-two years ; participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg, and was instantly killed in action at Get- 
tysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1803, being shot in the forehead 
by a musket ball. 

Hiiiam B. Wood was born in New York, and by occupation 
was a clerk ; he enlisted July 31st, 1802, aged eighteen years; 
was appointed Corporal, January 1st, 1803, and participated in 
tiie battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg; he was mortally 
wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1803, 
and died of wound received in action, in held hospital, near- 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1803. 

Arnold J. Ykekly was born in Gorham, New York, and at 
the time of entering the service was a student ; lie enlisted August 
7th, 1802, aged twenty-one years, and was in the battles of Har- 
per's Ferrv, Virginia, September 13th, ]4th and 15th, 1862, and 



474 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863, and was severely 
wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863, 
resulting in loss of the left eye, and slight injury to the right 
one ; he was discharged on account of wounds received in action, 
at Fort Schuyler, New York, August 25th, 1863 ; subsequently 
he was appointed and commissioned Second Lieuntenant in the 
Veteran Reserve Corps, for ability and meritorious service, and 
still remains in the service, United States Army. 

Frank Young was born in Gorham, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a miller ; he enlisted July 31st, 1862, aged nineteen 
years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and Morton's Ford ; 
he was appointed Corporal, November 18th, 1863; detached with 
provost guard at Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, 
and served in that capacity with the Army until the close of the 
war, when he was discharged with the Regiment. 

Recruits. 

Michael Cunningham was born in Quebec, Canada West, and 
by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted March 31st, 1864, aged 
eighteen years, and joined the Regiment April 14th, 1864; he 
participated in the following battles : The Wilderness, Po River, 
Spottsylvania, North Anna River, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Deep 
Bottom, Strawberry Plains and Ream's Station ; he was taken 
prisoner in action at Ream's Station, Virginia, August 25th, 1864 ; 
was exchanged March 28th, 1865, and subsequently discharged 
from the service. 

James Callon enlisted in 1864, and joined the Regiment • April 
1st, 1864; he was in the battles of the Wilderness, Po River, 
Spottsylvania, North Anna River and Tolopotomoy, and died 
of disease, in hospital, at City Point, Virginia, June 9th, 1864. 

John F. Duyee was born in New York city, and by occupa- 
tion was a printer; he enlisted September 1st, 1863, aged eighteen 
years, and joined the Regiment April 14th, 1864; he was 
wounded in action, battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864; 
rejoined the Regiment March 1st, 1865, and Mas again wounded 
in action at Boydton Road, Virginia, March 31st, 1865; he 



Biographical Sketches. 475 

returned to the Regiment in May, 1865, and was transferred to 
the 4th New York Heavy Artillery, June 3d, 1865. 

Edmoxd T. Dewey was born in Manchester, New York, and 
by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted February 9th, 1864, 
aged eighteen years, and joined the Regiment, March 25th, 1864 ; 
he was killed in the first action in which he was engaged, in the 
battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864. 

John Dutsawee enlisted in 1864, and joined the Regiment, 
April 1st, 1864 ; he participated in the battle of the Wilderness, 
and was killed in action May 6th, 1864. 

James Graham was born in Ireland, and by occupation was a 
clerk; he enlisted January 29th, 1864, aged twenty-five years, 
joined the Regiment, March 2d, 1864, and Mas in the battles of 
the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna River, 
Tolopotomoy and Cold Harbor ; he was wounded in action at 
Cold Harbor, Virginia, June 5th, 1864, and not heard from after 
being sent to general hospital. 

Henry Hagadorn was born in Phelps, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted February 15th, 1864, aged 
twenty-eight years ; joined the Regiment, March 25th, 1864, and 
participated in the battles of the Wilderness, Po River and Spott- 
sylvania ; he was missing in action at Spottsylvania, Virginia, 
May 18th, 1864, and was probably killed. 

John J. Moxuoe was born in Geneva, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a sailor; he enlisted February 24th, 1864, aged twen- 
ty-eight years, and joined the Regiment, March 25th, 1S64 ; lie 
was wounded in the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864, 
and was not heard from after being sent to general hospital. 

Albert Mikhock was born in Benton, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted February sth, 1864, aged 
nineteen years, and joined the Regiment, March 25th, 1864; he 
was wounded in the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 18(14, and 
was not heard from after being sent to general hospital. 

ErciKNE M. Smith was born in Potter, New York; enlisted in 
1^64, and joined the Regiment .March 25th, lstj4 ; he participated 
in the hattles of the Wilderness and P> River; and was wounded 



476 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

in action at Po River, May 10th, 1864 ; he rejoined the Regiment 
January 25th, 1865, and was on duty at division hospital until 
discharged at the close of the war. 

Jacob Wilson was born in Albany, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a farmer ; he enlisted February 1 7th, 1864, aged twenty- 
seven years, and joined the Regiment March 25th, 1864 ; he 
participated in the following battles : the Wilderness, Po River, 
Spottsylvania, North Anna River, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, 
Petersburg, Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, Ream's Station, 
Boydton Road, Sutherland Station, Farmville and Appomattox 
Court-house ; he was transferred to the 4th New York Heavy 
Artillery, June 2d, 1865. 



Biographical Sketches. 411 



O O M P A N Y E 



Company E was raised principally in Geneva, a portion of the 
men, however, under Lieutenant Beougii, coming from Rush- 
ville and its vicinity. The Company was recruited by its com- 
missioned officers, assisted by a few of the enlisted men, and the 
War Committee of the Senatorial district. The organization of 
the Company bears date August 14th, 1 S62, and the following were 
its original line officers : 

Henry D. Kipp, Captain. 

George E. Pritciiett, First Lieutenant. 

John II. Beough, Second Lieutenant. 

NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS. 

Fayette Green was born in Rushville, New York, and was 
a farmer by occupation; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and was appointed First Sergeant upon the 
organization of the Company ; he participated, in the following 
battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Sta- 
tion, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsyl- 
vania, North Anna, Tolopotomy and Cold Harbor ; he was 
wounded in action at Cold Harbor, Virginia, June 3d, 1864, and 
was mustered out, as supernumerary, upon the consolidation of 
the Regiment, December '25th, 1864. 

John C. Staintox. See Quartermaster .Ioiin C. Stainton, 

page 363. 

Jacois Siikkman. See First Lieutenant Jacoi: Sherman, page 
3s.5. 

Edward J. Barnes was born in Seneca, New York, and was a 
clerk by occupation ; he enlisted August 7th 1SG2, aged twenty- 
five years and was appointed Sergeant upon the organization of 
the Company ; he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Gettysburg ; was mortally wounded in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 3d, lsc>3, and died of wounds received in 



478 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

action, in field hospital, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 12th, 

1863. 

Joshua Bkixk was born in Cayuta, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a laborer; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged thirty 
years, and was appointed Corporal ; he participated in the battles 
of Harper's Ferry and Auburn Ford ; was taken prisoner in action, 
at the latter place, October 14th, 1863, and subsequently died in 
rebel prison. 

Byron W Scott was born in Rushville, New York, and was 
by occupation a cabinet maker; he enlisted July 14th, 1862, 
aged thirty-six years, and was appointed Corporal upon the 
organization of the Company ; he participated in the following 
battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Sta- 
tion, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, and the Wilderness; in Decem- 
ber, 1862, he was detailed as color guard, and served in that 
capacity until discharged from the service ; he was wounded 
while with the colors at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 

1863, after the death of Sergeant Bassett, and is reported to 
have instantly shot the rebel that killed the Sergeant before the 
colors changed hands ; he was also wounded at Auburn Ford, 
Virginia, October 14th, 1863, and at the Wilderness, May 6th, 
1864 ; and was mustered out of the service on account of wounds, 
as supernumerary, upon the consolidation of the Regiment, 
December 25th, 1864. 

John W Thompson was born in Utica, New York, and was 
by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged 
twenty-five years, and was appointed Corporal ; he participated 
in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettyburg ; and was killed 
in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 4th, 1863. 

William II. Stainton was born in Geneva, New York, and 
by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, and 
was appointed Corporal upon the organization of the Company ; 
he participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, was promoted 
to Sergeant, January 1st, 1863, and detached in Brigade Ambu- 
lance Corps, January 18th, 1863 ; he served in that capacity with 
the army until the consolidation of the Regiment, December 25th, 

1864, when he was mustered out as supernumerary. 



Biographical Sketches. 479 

John F. Sloat was born in Springwater, New York, and was 
a farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 7th, 1802, aged 
eighteen years, and was appointed Corporal upon the organization 
of the Company ; he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, 
September 13th, 14th and loth, 1862, and (Gettysburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, July 2d and 3d, 1863 ; he was mortally wounded in action 
at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863, and died from 
wounds, in field hospital at that place, July 12th, 1863. 

Charles P Gray was born in Geneva, Xew York, and by 
occupation was a shoemaker; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 
thirty-two years, was appointed Corporal, and participated in the 
battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg; he was detached with 
provost guard at Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1804, 
and serving in that capacity until the termination of the war, 
was discharged with the Regiment. 

William H. Pinch was born in Geneva, New York, and was 
by occupation a painter; he enlisted August 7th, 1802, aged 
twenty-four years, and was appointed Corporal ; he participated 
in the battles of Harper's Ferry and the "Wilderness ; was 
wounded in the latter action May 0th, 1864, and subsequently 
discharged on account of wounds. 

James O. Oeman was born in Waterloo, New York, and l>v 
occupation was a firmer; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, and was 
appointed Corporal upon the organization of the Company ; he 
participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 
13th, 14th and 15th, 1802, and died of disease in camp near Union 
Mills, Virginia, March 9th, 180:'.. 

Musk tans. 

Edwako A. Sava<;e was born in Genoa, Xew York, and was ;t 
clerk by occupation ; he enlisted as musician August 7th, 1862, and 
was on duty with the Regiment from its organization until the close 
of the war ; he served a greater portion of the time as hospital 
attendant, and was discharged with the Regiment. 

Chaui.es F. Raymond was born in Rushville, Xew York, and 
was an engineer by occupation ; he enlisted as musician, August 
13th, 1802, aged eighteen years, and during the winter of 1S03 



480 126th Regiment Xew York Volunteers. 

was on duty as attendant in regimental hospital ; he was dis- 
charged for disability, on account of injury, at Centerville, Vir- 
ginia, April 1st, 1863. 

Privates. 

Aa.uon H. Abeel was born in Middlesex, New York, and was 
a farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged nine- 
teen years, and participated in the following battles : Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and 
Morton's Ford ; he was detached with provost guard at Head-quar- 
ters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and serving in that capacity 
until the termination of the war, was discharged with the Regiment. 

Marcus Andrus was born in Syracuse, New York, and by 
occupation was a merchant ; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 
twenty-two years ; he participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; was afterward 
detached as musician in Brigade band, and serving in that 
capacity until the close of the war, was discharged with the Regi- 
ment. 

William D. Adriance was born in Lebanon, New York, and 
was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August *7th, 1862, aged 
twenty-eight years, and participated in the following battles : 
Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station and 
Mine Run ; he was wounded at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 
3d, 1863 ; and was detached with provost guard at Head-quarters 
2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, serving in that capacity until 
the close of the war, when he was discharged with the Regiment. 

Orrin D. Allen was born in Tioga, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a merchant; he enlisted August 14th, 1862, aged 
thirty-seven years ; and, participating in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, was discharged for physical disability at Chicago, Illinois, 
January 16 th, 1863. 

Benjamin F. Archer was born in Madison, New York, and 
was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 14th, 1862, aged 
twenty-four years, and participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry; deserted at Fort Wayne, September 2 7th, 1862. 

Albert L. Bogart was born in New York city, and was a 
farmer by occupation; he enlisted July 2.">th, 1862, aged nineteen 



Biographical Sketches. 481 

years, and participated in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's 
Ford, and the Wilderness ; he was wounded and missing in action, 
in the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864, and is reported 
dead. 

Tyler Brink was born in Cayuta, New York, and was a 
laborer by occupation ; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged twenty- 
two years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettys- 
burg ; he was wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
July 2d, 1862, transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, August 
10th, 1864, and, serving in that capacity until the close of the 
war, was discharged from the service. 

Jeeomb Beink was born in Cayuta, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a laborer; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged thirty- 
five years, and, participating in the battle of Harper's Ferry, was 
discharged for physical disability, at Baltimore, Maryland, Febru- 
ary 4th, 1863. 

Albert Beink was born in Cayuta, New York, and was by 
occupation a laborer; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged twenty- 
four years, and was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford and Bristow Station ; he was detached, 
October 17th, 1863, with the Artillery Brigade, and served in 
that capacity with the army until August, 1864, when he rejoined 
the Company, participating in all the battles of the closing cam- 
paign of the war, and was discharged with the Regiment. 

William Brink was born in Chemung, New York, and was by 
occupation a laborer; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged twenty- 
nine years; was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, and deserted at 
Frederick, Maryland, September 18th, 1862. 

John Bowen was born in Geneva, New York, and by occupa- 
tion was a carpenter; he enlisted August 7th, 1802, aged twenty- 
four years, and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Vir- 
ginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he was detailed on 
duty with Brigade Pioneer Corps, December 14th, 1802, and 
served in that capacity until his death, which occurred in hos- 
pital at City Point, Virginia, December 16th, 1804. 



482 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

James Burns was born in Geneva, New York, and was by 
occupation a blacksmith; he enlisted August 7th, 1862; was in 
the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 
15th, 1862, and was discharged for physical disability at Annapo- 
lis, Maryland, May 18th, 1863. 

Henry Becker was born in Germany, and was by occupation 
a carriage trimmer; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged thirty 
years, and participated in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, and Auburn Ford ; he was wounded in action at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863, and at Auburn Ford, 
Virginia, October 14th, 1863, and was discharged on account of 
wounds at Alexandria, Virginia, January 2d, 1864. 

Asa C. Billings was born in Otisco, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a carpenter; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged 
twenty-seven years, and participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry ; he was detached as teamster in quartermaster's depart- 
ment in March, 1863, and with provost guard at Head-quarters, 
2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, in which capacity he served 
until the close of the war, and was dischai'ged with the Regi- 
ment. 

Ambrose Bedell, was born in Seneca, New York, and was by 
occupation a chair-maker; he enlisted August 12th, 1862, aged 
thirty-four years; was appointed Corporal January 1st, 1863, 
and participated in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Po River, and Spottsylvania ; 
at the battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863, he 
seized the colors, as Sergeant Bassett fell, dead, and carried 
them for the balance of the day in the fight ; he was wounded in 
the hand the next day, while carrying the colors of the Regiment, 
and was transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, on account of 
wounds, October 1st, 1863; on the 10th of January, 1864, he was 
returned to the Regiment, at his own request, and was wounded 
in action in the leg, and permanently disabled, at Spottsylvania, 
May 12th, 1864 ; he was again transferred to the Veteran Reserve 
Corps, October 24th 1864, and was discharged on account of 
wounds, January 9th, 1865. 

Frederick Barnes was born in Seneca, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged twenty- 



Biographical Sketches. 483 

two years, and participated in the following battles : Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and 
Morton's Ford ; he was detached with provost guard at Head- 
quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and served in such 
capacity until September 4th, 1864, when he was sent to the 
hospital at City Point, Virginia, sick, and was mustered out as 
supernumerary, December 25th, 1864, upon the consolidation of 
the Regiment; he died at his home, near Seneca, New York, in 
January, 1865, from disease contracted while in the service. 

Jewett Benedict was born in Schuyler county, New York, and 
by occupation was a clerk; he enlisted August 18th, 1862, aged 
twenty one years, and participating in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, was discharged for physical disability, at Chicago, Illinois, 
October 17th, 1862. 

Robert D. Blaurett was born in Middlesex, New York, and 
was by occupation a carpenter; he enlisted August 2d, 1862, aged 
twenty-three years ; was severely wounded in action on Mary- 
land Heights, Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 1862, 
and he was discharged on account of wounds received in action, 
at Washington, District of Columbia, January 15th, 1863. 

James P Boyd w T as born in Phelps, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 13th, 1862, aged twenty- 
four years ; participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg ; and was killed in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
July 2d, 1SG3. 

James A. Ckei:i> was born in Benton, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a mason ; he enlisted August 26th, 1862, aged twenty 
years; participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and died in regimental 
hospital at Union Mills, Virginia, January 23d, 1863. 

Joiinatiian Cueed Avas born in Benton, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation; he enlisted August 13th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg; he was severely wounded in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 4th, 1863; was transferred to the Veteran 
Reserve Corps, Mirch 15th, 1864, and discharged from the service 
July 14th, 1*65. 

31 



484 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

Edward Cooper was born in England, and by occupation was 
a tanner; he enlisted August 14th, 1862, aged twenty-four years; 
was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, and deserted September 28th, 
1862 ; in September, 1864, he was arrested, returned to the Regi- 
ment, tried by general court-martial and sentenced to be shot to 
death by musketry ; but the sentence was commuted to dishonor- 
able discharge from the service and confinement at the Dry Tor- 
tugas during the war, as promulgated by General Orders, Head- 
quarters Army of the Potomac, October 18, 1864. 

Charles Crawford was born in Geneva, New York, and was 
a former by occupation; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and loth, 1862 ; he was absent sick in hos- 
pital, from February to October, 1863, and again absent sick, 
February 1st, 1864 ; the writer has been unable to learn distinctly 
what battles he was in, but thinks he participated in but few, 
being sick and unfit for duty most of the time while in the ser- 
vice ; he was discharged with the Regiment. 

Thekox T. Duxx was born in Milo, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 15th, 1862, aged twenty- 
one years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettys- 
burg ; he was transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, March 
15th, 1864, and subsequently discharged from the service. 

Thomas E. Dux> was born in Ulster, New York, and was by 
occupation a mason; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged thirty- 
nine years, and participated in the following battles : Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, 
Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains and 
Ream's Station; he was appointed Corporal, August 31st, 1863; 
was absent, sick, from May 3d to June 2d, 1864, and mustered 
out as supernumerary upon consolidation of the Regiment, Decem- 
ber 25th, 1864. 

John L. Dorr was born in Germany, and was by occupation 
:i farmer; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged twenty four years, 
and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry ; deserted at 
Chicago, Illinois, November 23d, 1862. 

Herman Fox was born in Germany, and by occupation was a 
cabinet maker; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged nineteen 



Biographical Sketches. 4K5 

years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Furry, (Gettys- 
burg' and Auburn Ford, when he was captured by the enemy ; 
he was afterward exchanged, and returned to the regiment, May 
27th, 1864, and was in the battles of Tolopotomoy and Cold 
Harbor, when he was detailed Brigade flag-bearer at Brigade 
Head-quarters, and in that capacity was in the actions at the front 
and left of Petersburg, Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, Ream's 
Station, assault on the lines around Petersburg, Boydton Plank 
Road and Sutherland's Station ; at the latter place, April 2d, 
1865, while charging the enemy's works the second time he was 
severely wounded, losing a hand, and fell from his horse, clinging 
to his flag with his other hand; but the Brigade having been 
repulsed, leaving him on the ground, the enemy tore the flag from 
his grasp, and by threats, thrusts, and blows, tried, in vain, to 
force him to rise ; the Brigade immediately re-formed, made a 
third charge and carried the position, and Fox was rescued ; he 
was discharged at the close of the war. 

John Galivax was born in Ireland, and was a farmer by occu- 
pation ; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged eighteen years, and was 
in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg; he was severely 
wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, Jul)" 2d, 186-1; 
rejoined the Regiment in the spring of 1804, and participated in 
the battles of the Wilderness and Po River ; he was wounded at 
Po River, May 10th, 1864, returned to the Regiment September 
15th, 1864; was again wounded in front of Petersburg, Virginia, 
in October, 18U4, and Mas absent, on account of wounds, until 
discharged at the close of the war. 

Alonzo Hakius was born in Milo, Xew York, and by occupa- 
tion was a farmer; he enlisted July 2!>th, 1802, aged twenty-one 
years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Uristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford and the 
Wilderness ; he was wounded in action at the Wilderness, Vir- 
ginia, May 6th, 1*64, rejoined the Company in the spring of 1H05, 
participated in the final campaign of the war, and was discharged 
with the Regiment at the close'. 

William Hkwitt was horn in Ireland, and was a farmer by 
occupation; he enlisted July 25th, 1802, aged thirty-two years, 
and was in the following battles: Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 



486 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, and Morton's Ford ; he 
was appointed Corporal, November 1st, 1863, and promoted to 
Sergeant, February 5th, 1865; he was detached with provost 
guard at Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, in which 
capacity he served until the close of the war, and he was dis- 
charged with the Regiment. 

George W Hafling was born in Switzerland, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged twenty- 
one years, and was in the battle of Harper's Ferry ; he was 
afterward detailed as regimental bugler, and was wounded in 
action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863; he rejoined 
the Regiment in October, 1863, and participated in the battles of 
Mine Run, Morton's Ford, the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsyl- 
vania, North Anna River, Cold Harbor, Petersburg and Deep 
Bottom ; he was detached as bugler at Brigade Head-quarters, 
August 4th, 1864, and served in such capacity until the close of 
the war, when he was discharged with the Regiment. 



e> v 



James Haet was born in England, and was by occupation a 
laborer; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged twenty-one years, 
and participated in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettys- 
burg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and Morton's 
Ford ; he was detached with provost guard at Head-quarters 2d 
Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, in which capacity he served until 
the termination of the war, and was discharged with the Regi- 
ment. 

George A. Hosmer was born in Albany, New York, and by 
occupation was a laborer; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry; he was detached on duty in the ambulance corps, 
January lYth, 1863, returned to the Regiment in July, 1863, and, 
participating in the battle of Auburn Ford, October 14th, 1863, 
was severely wounded in the right thigh ; he was transferred 
to the Veteran Reserve Corps, June 18th, 1864, and discharged 
from the service at the close of the war. 

Reuben H. Hammond was born in Baldwinsville, New York, and 
was by occupation a sailor; he enlisted August 12th, 1862, aged 
thirty years, participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 



Biographical Sketches. 487 

September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and deserted in the winter 
of 1863. 

Edward J. Hindmarch was born in Tyrone, New York, and 
was a laborer by occupation; he enlisted August 14th, 1862, 
aged eighteen years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg ; he was absent sick from October to 
December, 1863, and was detailed in Regimental Drum Corps, 
May 1st, 1864, in which capacity he served until the close of the 
war, when he was discharged with the Regiment. 

Franklin" Hounson was born in Ontario, New York, and by 
occupation was a mason; he enlisted August 14th, 1862, aged 
nineteen years, and participated in the following battles : Har- 
per's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, 
Morton's Ford and the Wilderness ; on the 10th of May, 1864, 
he was sent to general hospital, sick, and subsequently died at his 
home in Benton, New York, from disease contracted while in the 
service. 

Patrick Judd was born in Canada, and was a brick-maker by 
occupation; he enlisted August 15th, 1862, aged twenty-six years, 
and was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Bristow Station and Mine Run ; he was sent to 
general hospital, sick, February 1st, 1864, and was discharged for 
physical disability at Washington, District Columbia, February 
26th, 1864. 

Georc;e T. Kelley was born in Trumansburgh, New York, 
and was by occupation a blacksmith ; he enlisted August 7th, 
1862, aged thirty years, and participated in the following battles : 
Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine 
Run, Morton's Ford and the Wilderness; he was appointed Cor- 
poral, October 26th, 1802, and promoted to Sergeant, September 
1st, 1*03; on the 6th of May, 1804, he was severely wounded in 
the battle of the Wilderness, was transferred to the Veteran 
Reserve Corps, January 17th, 1*05, and discharged from the ser- 
vice at the close of the war. 

Nelson ]>. Keith was born in Macon, Georgia, and was by 
occupation a carpenter; he enlisted August Nth, 1802, aged 
thirty-tour years, and, participating in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 



488 126th Regiment ^Yew York Volunteers. 

was severely wounded on Maryland Heights, September 13th, 

1862 ; he was transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, March 
15th, 1864, and was discharged from the service at the close of 
the war. 

Clement King was born in Romulus, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a farmer ; he enlisted August 12th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and, participating in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, was discharged 
for physical disability, at Union Mills, Virginia, March 17th, I860. 

Richard Kirk was born in Madison, New York, and was by 
occupation a boatman ; he enlisted August 14th, 1862, aged 
twenty-four years, and deserted while at Camp Swift, Geneva, 
New York, August 26th, 1862. 

Franklin R. Knapp was born in Penu Yan, New York, and 
by occupation was a painter; he enlisted August 15th, 1862, 
aged twenty-two years, and participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry; deserted at Chicago, Illinois, November 23d, 1862. 

George \Y~ Larham was born in Seneca, New York, and was 
a farmer by occupation; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg and Auburn Ford ; he was wounded in action at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863 ; taken prisoner at 
Auburn Ford, October 14th, 1863, and died in rebel prison at 
Richmond, Virginia, November 25th, 1863. 

Martin Lamphere was born in Junius, New York, and was by 
occupation a marble cutter; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 
twenty-six years, and participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he died of disease, 
in regimental hospital, in camp near Union Mills, Virginia, Jan- 
uary 19th, 1863. 

Daniel H. McCoy was born in New Jersey, and by occupa- 
tion was a carriage-trimmer; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 
twenty-four years, and was appointed Corporal in the winter of 

1863 ; he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettys- 
burg, and was discharged for physical disability at "Washington. 
District of Columbia, November 19th, 1863. 



Biographical Sketches. 480 

Richard Macy was born in Hudson, New York, and was by 
occupation a book-keeper; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and loth, 1B02 ; was discharged 
for physical disability at Baltimore, Maryland, December 17th, 
1862. 

Edgar G Miller was born in Gorham, New York, and at the 
time of entering the service was a student; he enlisted August 
12th, 1862, aged nineteen years, and participated in the battle of 
Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ;. 
was discharged for physical disability at Union Mills, Virginia,. 
February 10th, 1863; he died at Canandaigua, New York, Feb- 
ruary 10th, 1863, of disease contracted while in the service. 

Le Roy McFarlix was born in Yates county, New York, and 
was a farmer by occupation; he enlisted August 13th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and participated in the following battles : Har- 
per's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford and Bristow Station ; on 
the loth of October, 1863, he was sent to general hospital, sick : 
was transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, October 17th, 
1864, and was discharged from the service July 18th, 1865. 

Johx Olf was born in Germany, and was by occupation a far- 
mer; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged twenty-one years, and 
was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford and 
the Wilderness ; he was missing in action in the battle of the 
Wilderness, May 6th, 1804; has not since been heard from, and 
is supposed to be dead. 

Morris OA'oxxell was born in Ireland, and was a laborer In- 
occupation ; he enlisted August 4th, 1802, aged thirty-three 
Years, and participated in the following battles; Harper's Ferry T 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and Mor- 
ton's Ford; on the 1st day of May, 1S64, he was detailed on 
duty with regimental drum corps, and, serving in that capacity 
until the close of the war, was discharged with the Regiment. 

Joiix IJ. Ohm a.\ was born in Geneva, Xew York, and by occu- 
pation was a fanner; he enlisted August 11th, 1802, aged twenty- 
four years, and was in the following battles: Harper's Ferry. 



490 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and Mor- 
ton's Ford ; he was detached with provost guard at Head-quar- 
ters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, in which capacity he served 
until the termination of the war, and was discharged with the 
Regiment. 

Lorenzo Phillips was born in Naples, New York, and was 
by occupation a carpenter ; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged 
twenty years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Gettysburg; he was mortally wounded in action at Gettys- 
burg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863, and died, from wounds, in 
hospital, at Baltimore, Maryland, July 18th, 1863. 

Edwin Pratt was born in Canandaigua, New York, and by 
occupation was a laborer; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry ; 
was discharged for physical disability at Union Mills, Virginia, 
February 14th, 1863. 

John L. Partridge was born in Geneva, New York, and was 
by occupation a boiler maker; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 
nineteen years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, July 2d, 3d and 4th, 1863 ; he was sent to general hospital, 
sick, after the battle of Gettysburg, and died at Washington, 
District of Columbia, August 23d, 1863. 

Edwin Palmer was born in Yates county, New York, and was 
by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 12th, 1862, aged 
thirty-four years, and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia ; was severely wounded in action on Maryland Heights, 
September 13th, 1862 ; he was discharged on account of wounds 
received in action, at Annapolis, Maryland, January 12th, 1863. 

Henry E. Parsons was born in Gorham, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 2d, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; died of 
disease, near Union Mills, Virginia, February 3d, 1863. 

Henry Runyan was born in Rushville, New York, and was 
a cooper by occupation; he enlisted August 13th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and participated in the following battles : 



Biographical Sketches. 491 

Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, 
Mine Run, and Morton's Ford ; on the 4th of April, 1864, he was 
detached with provost guard at Head-quarters, 2d Army Corps, 
in which capacity he served until the close of the war, and was 
discharged with the Regiment. 

Joseph Ris was born in Germany, and was by occupation a 
farmer; he enlisted July 18th, aged twenty-eight years, and par- 
ticipated in the battle of Harper's Ferry ; deserted at Chicago, 
Illinois, November 23d, 1862. 

Sherman W Robinson was born in Prattsburgh, New York, 
and by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, 
aged nineteen years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg ; he was wounded in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863, and was discharged on account of 
wounds, December 26th, 1864. 

James B. Reynold was born in England, and was by occupa- 
tion a laborer; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, and participated in 
the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg ; he was wounded 
in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July, 2d, 1863 ; trans- 
ferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, December 15th, 1863; was 
again wounded in action near Baltimore, and subsequently died 
of his wounds. 

George C. Russell was born in Waterloo, New York, and by 
occupation was a carpenter; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 
Twenty-seven years, and participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; he was afterward 
detached on duty in Brigade Quartermaster's department; trans- 
ferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, March 15th, 1864, and 
serving in the latter capacity until the close of the war, was dis- 
charged from the service. 

Palmek \V Roberts was horn in Seneca Falls, New York, 
and was a druggist by occupation ; he enlisted August. Ilth,is62, 
aged twenty-one years, and participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1802 ; in January, 
1863, lie was detailed as druggist, at Urigade hospital, in which 
capacity he served until April 24th, lsii4, when he was discharged 
to accept appointment as hospital steward, United States Army ; 



492 126 th Regime nt New York Volunteers. 

in May, 1864, he was placed on duty as hospital steward, 1st 
Division 2d Army Corps hospital, and, serving in that capacity 
until the close of the war, was transferred to the Surgeon-General's 
Department, Washington, District Columbia. 

Darwin A. Rudd was born in Wyoming, New York, and In- 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 12th, 1862, aged 
thirty years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and loth, 1862, and Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d, 3d and 4th, 1863 ; on the 27th of July, 
1863, he was detailed on recruiting service at Elmira, New York, 
in which capacity he served until the close of the war, and was 
discharged with the Regiment. 

Frederick Rltter Avas born in Germany, and was by occupa- 
tion a mason; he enlisted August 13th, 1862, aged twenty-two 
years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg ; 
he was sent sent to general hospital, sick, soon after the battle of 
Gettysburg, and died at Washington, District of Columbia, 
August 19th, 1863. 

John F Randolph. See Lieutenant and Adjutant John F. 
Randolph, page 358. 

Archibald L. Ray was born in Albany, New York, and by 
occupation was a laborer; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged 
twenty-six years, and participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry; deserted at Chicago, Illinois, September 30th, 1862. 

George Stroup was born in Montgomery county, New York, 
and was by occupation a bill poster; he enlisted July 30th, 1862, 
aged forty-four years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d, 3d and 4th, 1863; on the 25th of July, 
1863, while on the march, near White Plains, Virginia, he was 
captured and taken prisoner by the enemy ; was exchanged and 
returned to the Regiment in October of the same year, and sent 
to general hospital, sick, February 1st, 1864; he was discharged 
for physical disability, at Washington, District of Columbia, 
March 19th, 1864. 

John H. Saiilpauc-h was born in Phelps, New York, and was 
by occupation a printer; lie enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged 



Biographical Sketches. 493 

twenty-two years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry anil 
Gettysburg ; he Avas mortally wounded in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863, and died in the field hospital at that 
place, July 4th, 1863. 

Marquis K. Simpson was born in Orange county, New York, 
and by occupation was a carriage maker; he enlisted August 7th, 
1802, aged thirty three years, and participated in the battle of 
Harper's Ferry, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; on the 8th 
of January, 1863, he was detailed on duty at the Brigade hospi- 
tal ; in the winter of 1864, he was transferred to the 1st Division 
hospital, and subsequently to the 2d Corps hospital at City Point, 
Virginia ; he continued on detached duty until the close of the 
war, when he was discharged with the Regiment. 

Charles H. Seiglar was born in Geneva, New York, and was 
by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 14th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry; 
deserted at Chicago, Illinois, October 10th, 1862. 

Edmund S. Spendlove was born in Geneva, New York, and 
was a clerk by occupation; he enlisted August 7th, 1802, aged 
eighteen years, and participated in the following battles : Har- 
per's Ferry, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, and Morton's Ford; 
on the 20th of October, 1863, he was detailed on duty in the Bri- 
gade Commissary department, and continued on such duty until 
February 1st, 1864 ; he was detached with provost guard at 
Head-quarters, 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1804, and detailed as 
orderly at Corps Head-quarters, April 7th, in which capacity lie 
served until the close of the war, and was discharged with the 
Regiment. 

CiiEsxEii B. Smith was born in Geneva, Xew York, and was 
by occupation a farmer; lie enlisted August 20th, ls.02, aged 
eighteen years, and was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, 
Oettysburg and Auburn Ford ; he was taken prisoner, in action, 
at Auburn Ford, Virginia, October 14th, 1803; was exchanged 
and rejoined the Regiment, May 27th, 1804; afterward partici- 
pated in the battles of Tolopotnmoy, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, 
Deep l!ottoni, Strawberry Plains and Ream's Station; on the 2oth 
of August, ]si;4, lie was again taken prisoner, in action at Ream's 



494 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

Station, Virginia ; was exchanged and returned to the Regiment, 
February 21st, 1865, and participated in the final campaign of the 
war ; was discharged with the Regiment at its close. 

William J. Springstead was born in Geneva, New York, and 
was by occupation a carpenter; he enlisted August 15th, 1862, 
aged eighteen years, and participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry ; deserted near Frederick, Maryland, June 28th, 1863. 

Charles Scherle was born in Germany, and by occupation 
was a laborer; he enlisted August 15th, 1862, aged twenty-seven 
years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg ; 
he was severely wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
July 2d, 1863, and was discharged on account of wounds, at 
Portsmouth Grove, Rhode Island, May 17th, 1864. 

Leonard Seitz was born in Germany, and by occupation was 
a butcher ; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged twenty four years, 
and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettys- 
bui'g ; he was severely wounded in action at Gettysburg, Penn- 
sylvania, July 2d, 1863 ; transferred to the Veteran Reserve 
Corps, January 5th, 1865, and discharged from the service at the 
close of the war. 

Alexander Thornton was born in Ireland, and was by occu- 
pation a farmer; he enlisted August 7th, 1862,, aged twenty-two 
years, and was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettys- 
burg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and Morton's 
Ford; on the 4th of April, 1864, he was detached with provost 
guard at Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, in which capacity he 
served until the close of the war, when he was discharged with the 
Regiment. 

George W Turner was born in England, and was by occu- 
pation a carpenter; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged thirty- 
eight years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg ; he was killed in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
July 2d, 1863. 

John C. Van Zant was born in Syracuse, New \'ork, and by 
occupation was a painter; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged 
twenty-nine years, and, participating in the battle of Harper's 



Biographical Sketches. 495 

Ferry, was discharged for physical disability at AYishington, 
District Columbia, February 1st, 1864. 

Daniel Whipple was born in Cayuga county, New York, and 
was by occuj)ation a laborer; he enlisted July 31st, 1862, aged 
twenty-nine years, and was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford and Bristow Station ; he was severely 
wounded in action at Bristow Station, October 14th, 1863, and 
was discharged on account of wounds, at Elmira, New York, 
June 30th, 1864. 

Stephen Walker was born in Farrington, New York, and 
was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 2d, 1862, aged 
twenty-four years, and participated in the following battles : 
Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford and Bristow Station ; 
he was wounded in action at Bristow Station, Virginia, October 
14th, 1863 ; transferred to the Veteran Reseiwe Corps, February 
loth, 1864, and discharged from the service at the close of the 
war. 

Harry Wilson was born at Blood's Corners, New York, and 
was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged 
twenty-four years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg; he was killed in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863. 

Charles Wheeler was born in Geneva, New York, and In- 
occupation was a machinist ; he enlisted August 9th, 1N62, aged 
eighteen years, and was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's 
Ford, the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsyh ania, North Anna 
River, and Tolopotomoy ; he was killed in action at Tolojwtomov, 
May 31st, 1864. 

Ciiaklks Wolvkktox was born in New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 0th, 1862, aged nineteen 
years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettys- 
burg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, and Morton's 
Ford ; on the 4th of April, 1S64, he was detached with provost 
guard at Head-quarters, 2d Army Corps, in which capacity he 
served until the close of the war, when he was discharged with 
the Regiment. 



496 120 r ii Regime xt New York Volunteers. 

Recruits. 

Walter Clark was born in England, and was by occupation 
a laborer; he enlisted April 14th, 1864, aged thirty-seven years; 
joined the Regiment, May 3d, 1864, and was killed in action in 
the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1804. 

John Fountain' was born in Netherlands, and was by occupa- 
tion a laborer; he enlisted April 7th, 1864, aged forty-four years, 
and joined the Regiment, May 3d, 1864; he was wounded in 
action in the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864 ; was sub- 
sequently transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, and dis- 
charged from the service September 5th, 1805. 

William Wiialax was born in Ireland, and by occupation was 
a cooper; he enlisted April 1st, 1864, aged thirty-two years, and 
joined the Regiment May 3d, 1864 ; he participated in the follow- 
ing battles : the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North 
Anna River, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor and Petersburg ; on the 
16th of June 1864 he was severely wounded in action in front of 
Petersburg, and was discharged on account of wounds October 
Sth, 1864. 



Biographical iSkhtchks. 497 



COMPANY F 



Company F was raised partly in Ontario and partly in Seneca 
county ; Captain Shi.mer recruited a portion of the men in and 
near Geneva ; a portion were recruited by First Lieutenant Ira 
Muxsox, in Seneca county, and a portion by Second Lieutenant 
Tex Eyck Muxsox, in the western part of Ontario county ; the 
Company was organized, August 15th, 1802, and the original line 
officers were as follows : 

Isaac Shimee, Captain. 

Ira Muxsox, First Lieutenant. 

Tex Eyck Muxsox, Second Lieutenant. 

NOX-COMMISSIOXED OFFICERS. 

Van Burex Wheat was born in Phelps, Mew York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 7th, 1802, aged 
twenty-seven years, and was appointed First Sergeant upon the 
organization of the Company ; he participated in the battles of 
Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1802, 
and Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1803 ; he was wounded 
in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863, and was 
discharged July 24th, 1863, to accept an appointment in a colored 
Regiment, and was commissioned Second Lieutenant 29th United 
States Colored Troops; he was honorably discharged from the 
service in the summer of 1864. 

Levi X. Beeise was born in Lima, New York, and was by 
occupation a teacher; he enlisted August 8th, 1802, aged twenty- 
four years, and was appointed Sergeant ; he was in battles of Har- 
per's Ferry, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettys- 
burg, Pennsylvania, July 2d and 3d, 1802 ; he was wounded in 
action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1803, and discharged 
November 4th, 1803, to accept an appointment in a colored Kegi- 
ment, and was commissioned Lieutenant United States Colored 
Troops; subsequently he was honorably discharged from the ser- 
vice. 



498 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

Asa J. Rose was born in Onondaga county, New York, and 
by occupation was a carpenter; he enlisted August 12th, 1862, 
aged thirty-two years, and was appointed Sergeant ; he was in 
action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 
15th, 1862, and was discharged for disability, December 12th, 
1862. 

Harrison B. Ferguson was born in Ontario county, New 
York, and was by occupation a merchant ; he enlisted August 
9th, 1862, aged twenty years, and was appointed Sergeant upon 
the organization of the Company ; he participated in the battles 
of Harper's Ferry, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, 
Morton's Ford, and the Wilderness, and was wounded in action, 
in the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864 ; he was commis- 
sioned Second Lieutenant, December 20th, 1863, but was unable 
to muster in consequence of the reduced numbers of the Regi- 
ment, and was discharged as supernumerary upon its consolidation, 
December 25th, 1864. 

E. D. Copp was born in Ontario county, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 
twenty-seven years, and was appointed Sergeant ; he partici- 
pated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Viginia, September 13th, 
14th and 15th, 1862; was transferred to the Veteran Reserve 
Corps, March 23d, 1864, and discharged from the service June 
22d, 1865. 

George W Sheldon was born in Mount Morris, New York, 
and was a student; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged twenty- 
five years, and was appointed Corporal; he participated in the 
battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg, and was discharged 
September 19th, 1863, to accept an appointment in a colored 
Regiment, and was commissioned Captain in the 6th United 
States Colored Troops ; he was killed in action while on duty 
with his Regiment in front of Petersburgh, Virginia, July, 1864. 

Charles Kline was born in Seneca Falls, New York, and was 
a farmer by occupation ; he enlisted July 30th, 1862, aged twenty- 
nine years, and was appointed Corporal ; he was in the battles of 
Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg and Auburn Ford ; and was severely 
wounded, in action, at Auburn Ford, Virginia, October 14th 
1863 ; he was promoted to Sergeant, November 1st, 1863, and 



Biographical Sketches. 499 

rejoined the Regiment June 24th, 1864; he was transferred to 
Company E upon consolidation of the Regiment, December 25th, 
1864, and promoted to First Sergeant, February 8th, 1865 ; he 
participated in the closing campaign of the war, and was dis- 
charged with the Regiment. 

Ralph D. Short was born in Manchester, Ontario county, New 
York, and by occupation was a merchant ; he enlisted August 
7th, 1862, aged twenty-one years, and was appointed Corporal; 
he was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 
14th and 15th, 1862, and discharged for physical disability at 
Baltimore, Maryland, November 21st, 1862. 

James M. Bardex was born in Barrington, New York, and was 
a farmer by occupation; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and was appointed Corporal ; he participated in 
the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 
15th, 1862, and died of disease in hospital camp, near Union Mills, 
Virginia, February 23d, 1863. 

Myron Adams was born in Ontario county, and was a student ; 
he enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged twenty-one years, was 
appointed Corporal upon the organization of the Company, and 
particpated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 
13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; he was discharged by order of the Secre- 
tary of War, March 19th, 1863, to accept position in the govern- 
mental department, Washington, District of Columbia; subse- 
quently he was appointed Second Lieutenant 2d United States 
Colored Troops, and was afterward commissioned with the same 
rank in the Signal Corps; he was discharged from the service at 
the close of war, in 1S05. 

H. B. Muxsox was horn in Tyre, New York, and by occupa- 
tion was a farmer; he enlisted August 14th, 1*02, aged twenty- 
four years, and was appointed Corporal; he was in action at 
Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13tli, 14th and 15th, 1S02, 
and was discharged for disability at Chicago, Illinois, December 
16th, 1802. 

Olive it Decker was born in Ontario county, New York, and 
was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 9th, 1802, aged 
twenty-five years, and was appointed Corporal ; he was in action 

:v2 



500 1~-6th Rkglve.xt JS'kw York Y olujstkkks. 

at Harper's Ferry, and deserted at Baltimore, Maryland, in 
November, 1802. 

Chaki.es Terihsh was born in Junius, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation; he enlisted August Sth, 1862, aged 
twenty-six years ; was appointed Corporal, and participated in 
the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow 
Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, the Wilderness, Po River and 
Spottsylvania; he was severely wounded in action at Spottsylva- 
nia, Virginia, May 12th, 1864; rejoined the Regiment in the fall 
of 1864, and was engaged with it in the final campaign of the 
war; he was promoted to Sergeant, November 1st, 1863, and was 
discharged with the Regiment. 

Musicians. 

Frank D. Spkixo was born in Ontario county, New York, and 
by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted July 30th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and was on duty with the Regiment until after 
the battle of Gettysburg; he was sent to general hospital, sick, 
at Baltimore, Maryland, July 16th, 1863, and after recovery was 
placed on duty at the hospital, serving in that capacity until the 
close of the war, and was discharged June 1st, 1865. 

Jacob Ladu was born in Fishkill, New York, and by occupa- 
tion was a mechanic ; he enlisted August 15th, 1862, aged twenty- 
four years ; participated with the Regiment in the battle of Har- 
per's Ferry, and was discharged for disability, at Chicago, Illinois, 
November 1st, 1862. 

Privates. 
Edward P Adams was born in Ontario county, New York, 
and at the breaking out of the war was a student ; he enlisted 
August 8th, 1862, aged twenty-eight years; participated in the 
battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 
loth, 1862, and was detached as Quartermaster's clerk in May, 
1863 ; he was discharged July 24th, 1863, and commissioned 
Quartermaster 2d United States Colored Troops ; subsequently 
he was commissioned in the United Signal Corps, and, serving: in 
this capacity until the close of the war, was discharged from the 
service. 



Biographical Sketches. 50 1 

Scott Barker was born in Middletown, Virginia, and was a 
student; lie enlisted August 12th, 1862, aged twenty-four years, 
and was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg 
and Auburn Ford ; he was severely wounded in action at Auburn 
Ford, Virginia, October 14th, I860 ; appointed Corporal Novem- 
ber 1st, I860, and discharged with the Regiment at the close of 
the war. 

Henry M. Barber was born in North Greenville, New York, 
and was a farmer by occupation; he enlisted August 25th, 1862, 
aged nineteen years ; was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Vir- 
ginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and discharged for 
disability at Chicago, Illinois, April 16th, 1863. 

Leandee Bboavnell was born in Dutchess county, New York, 
and was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, 
aa;ed twenty-six years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg and Auburn Ford ; he was killed, in action, at 
Auburn Ford. Virginia, October 14th, 1863. 

John H. Brownell was born in Junius, New York, and by 
occupation was a mechanic; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged 
thirty-seven years, and participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he was 
detailed as wagonmaster, .January 1st, 1863, and served in such 
capacity with the army in all its campaigns until April, 1864, 
when he was detached as mounted pioneer at Head-quarters 3d 
Brigade, 1st Division 2d Army Corps, and was discharged with 
the Regiment at the close of the war. 

George \V Boss was born in Rome, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation; he enlisted August 2d, 1862, aged eighteen 
years ; he was mortally wounded in action on Maryland Heights, 
Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 1862, and died of 
wounds received in action at the post hospital at Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 25th, 1S62. 

Ciiaui.ks E. I>.u;<;eki.v was born in Ontario, New York, 
and by occupation was a farmer ; he enlisted in August, 1.862, 
aged eighteen years; participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1802, and was 
discharged for disability at Chicago, Illinois, December 31st, 1862. 



502 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

George E. Beadle was born in Wayne county, New York, 
and was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 2d, 1862, 
aged eighteen years, and participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and loth, 1862; he was 
transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, September 1st, 1863, 
and subsequently discharged from the service. 

Abeam A. Bush was born in Junius, New York, and was a far- 
mer by occupation ; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged twenty 
years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 
13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he was detailed on duty with the 
wagon train, January, 1863, and served in the capacity, 
accompanying the army in its campaigns until the close of the 
war, when he was discharged with the Regiment. 

George W Becker. See non-commissioned staff, hospital 
steward, George W Becker, page 396. 

Lewis A. Ball was born in Portage, New York, and was by 
occupation a mechanic; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged 
twenty years ; was wounded in action on Maryland Heights, 
Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 1862 ; he was appointed 
Corporal, November 1st, 1863, and participated in the following 
battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Morton's Ford, the Wilder- 
ness, Po River, Spottsylvania, Noi-th Anna River, Tolopotomoy, 
Cold Harbor, Petersburg, and the closing campaign of the war, 
including the capture of Lee at Appomattox Court-house ; he 
was discharged with the Regiment. 

John W Bishop was born in Romulus, New York, and by 
occupation was a boatman; he enlisted July 31st, 1862, aged 
forty-two years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863, and was severely wounded in action 
at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863; he was transferred 
to the Veteran Reserve Corps, March 6th, 1864, and discharged 
from the service at the close of the war. 

George Bush was born in Ulster county, New York, and was 
a mechanic by occupation; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged 
twenty-eight years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he was detailed on duty 



Biographical Sketches. 503 

as teamster with the wagon train, January 1st, 1863, and served 
in such capacity until the close of the war, accompanying the 
army in all its campaigns, and was discharged with the Regiment. 

Stephen G. Babcock was born in Tyre, New York ; he 
enlisted July 30th, 1862, aged eighteen years, and participated in 
the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow 
Station, Mine Run and Morton's Ford ; he was detached with 
provost guard at Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, 
and served in such capacity until the close of the war ; he was 
appointed Corporal, November 1st, 1863, and was discharged 
with the Regiment. 

George A. Carr was born in Hopewell, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg ; he was severely wounded in action at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863 ; was subsequently 
transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, and discharged from the 
service at the close of the war. 

Edhond Ceaft was born in Cayuga county, New York, and 
was a farmer by occupation; he enlisted July 30th, 1862, aged 
twenty-two years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863; he was severely 
wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863, 
resulting in the loss of the left arm, and was discharged on 
account of wounds received in action, May 19th, 1865. 

John II. Crane was born in Tyre, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 12th, 1862, aged twenty- 
three years ; participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and died of disease, in hos- 
pital camp, near Union Mills, Virginia, March 23d, 1863. 

Platt Clark was born in Fayette, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged twenty- 
two years, and participated in the following battles : Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford and Bristow Station; he was 
mortally wounded, in action, at Bristow Station, Virginia, Octo- 



504 126th Regiment New York Volvnteers. 

her 14th, 1803, and died of wounds, received in action, at Fairfax 
Court-house, Virginia, October 20th, 1863. 

John Oouurx was born in Scotland, and by occupation was a 
mechanic; he enlisted August 18th, 1862, aged thirty-five years ; 
was in action at Harper's Ferry, and deserted at Centerville, Vir- 
ginia, May 6th, 186:!. 

Jeremiah Claflix was horn in East Bloomfield, New York, 
and by occupation was a farmer; lie enlisted July 30th, 1862, 
aged nineteen years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, and Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d, 3d and 4th, 1865, and Morton's Ford, 
February 4th, 1864; he was detached with provost guard at 
Head-quarters, 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and served in 
that capacity until the close of the war, when he was discharged 
with the Regiment. 

James G. Camp was born in East Bloomfield, New York, and 
was a farmer by occupation; he enlisted July 30th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 13th, ] 4th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863 ; he was severely wounded in action 
at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863 ; was transferred to 
the Veteran Reserve Corps, March 23d, 1864, and discharged 
from the service at Baltimore, Maryland, August 11th, 1865. 

Andrew E. Graver was born in Onondaga county, New York, 
and by occupation was a laborer; he enlisted July 19th, 1862, 
aged nineteen years, and w T as killed in action on Maryland 
Heights, Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 1862 ; he was 
the first man killed in action, in the Regiment. 

Samuel J. Clark was born in Iowa, and was a laborer In- 
occupation ; he enlisted August 12th, 1862, aged twenty years, 
and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 
13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 
2d, 1863 ; was mortally wounded in action at Gettysburg, Penn- 
sylvania, July 2d, 1863, and died in the field hospital at that 
place, July 8th, 1863. 

Michael Cunningham was born in Canada, and by occupation 
was a farmer ; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged twenty-one years. 



/>'/()(. HA /' IIK'A L ^h KTCj/hS. fiOf) 

arid participated in tin- battles of Harper's Ferry, Yirginia, Sep- 
tember l;itli, 14th and 15th, 1802, and Get! ysburg, Pennsylvania, 
July 2d, isi;:i : he was killed in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylva- 
nia, July 2d, 18t>:!. 

Fuasmis D. Dkijk was born in Seneca, New York, and was by 
occupation a mechanic ; he enlisted August !)tb, ] s ( j 2 , aged twenty- 
five years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, < lettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Pristow Station, .Mine Hun and Morton's Ford ; he 
was detached with provost guard at Head-quarters 2d Army 
Corps, A]>ril 4th, isot, and served in that capacity until the close 
of the war; lie was appointed Serjeant, November 1st, I sot, and 
was discharged with the Regiment. 

Andkew J. Daykm'okt was born in "Wolcott, New York, and 
by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August llth, 1802, aged 
thirty years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 101.lt. 14th and loth, 1862, and Gettysburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, Jul}' 2d. 186 -> ; he was wounded in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d, lstio, rejoined the Regiment afterward 
and participated in the battles of Mine Run, Mortons Ford and 
the Wilderness ; he was wounded in action at the battle of the 
Wilderness, May 6th, 1864, rejoined the Regiment in the fall of 
1864, participated in the closing campaigns of ihe war, and was 
discharged with the Regiment. 

XoiiMAN Davknpoiit was born in Wolcott, New York, and 
was a farmer by occupation ; he enlisted July 25th, 1802, aged 
twenty-six years, and was in action at Harper's Ferrv, Virginia, 
September lath, 14th and loth, 1862 ; he died of disease in hos- 
pital, camp near Union Mills, Virginia, January flth, 18o:s. 

Thomas Dolan Mas born in Ireland, and by occupation was a 
farmer; he enlisted August llth, 1862, aged twenty-one years; 
was in action at Harper's Ferry, and deserted at Chicago, Illinois. 
November 1st, 1862. 

Aakon Df.ikki: was born in Wayne county, New York, and 
by occupation was a laborer; he enlistee] August Oth, 1802, aged 
twenty-six years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Yirginia, 
September l.'.th. 14th and loth, 1802; he was detached in the 
ambulance corps, January 18th, 18o;t ; returned to the Regiment 



506 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

in March, 1864, and was detailed in pioneer corps in April of the 
same year; he returned to the Regiment in the fall of 1864; 
participated in the battles of the closing campaign of the war, 
and was discharged with the Regiment. 

Ephraiji C. Dubois was born in Seneca, New York, and was 
by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, 
Morton's Ford and the Wilderness ; he was wounded in action at 
the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864 ; subsequently 
rejoined the Regiment, and was wounded in action at Boydton 
Road, March 31st, 1865 ; he was discharged at Washington, 
District of Columbia, July 17th, 1865. 

Franklin P Egerton was born in Ontario county, New York, 
and was a farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, 
aged nineteen years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford 
and the Wilderness ; he was wounded in action, in the battle of 
the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864 ; subsequently rejoined the 
Regiment, and was detached with provost guard at Head-quarters 
2d Army Corps, serving in that capacity until the close of the 
war, when he was discharged with the Regiment. 

John M. Edwards was born in Seneca county, New York, and 
by occupation was a laborer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; he was discharged for 
disability at Baltimore, Maryland, March 18th, 1862. 

Chauncey L. Fowler was born in Sodus, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged eighteen 
years, and participated in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg and Auburn Ford ; he was mortally wounded in 
action at Auburn Ford, Virginia, October 14th, 1863, and died of 
wounds received in action October 20th, 1863. 

Oliver Fiero was born in Gorham, New York, and by occupa- 
tion was a farmer; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged twenty- 
one years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettyburg; he was sent to general hospital, sick, September 24th, 



Biographical Sketches. 507 

1863; was detached on duty in the commissary department, at 
Alexandria, Virginia, in February, 1864, and discharged from the 
service at Alexandria, Virginia, July 20th, 1865. 

Abeam X. Fieeo was born in Hopewell, New York, and was 
by occupation a farmer ; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged nine- 
teen years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863 ; he was severely wounded in action 
at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863; was transferred to 
the Veteran Reserve Corps, February 6th, 1864, and discharged 
from the service at the close of the war. 

James P Fulton was born in Seneca, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged nine- 
teen years, and participated in the following battles : Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, 
Morton's Ford, and the Wilderness ; he was severely wounded, 
through the thigh at the battle of the "Wilderness, May 6th, 
1864, and was left on the field and captured by the enemy; he 
remained upon the field for three weeks, and was afterward 
removed to a temporary hospital, and subsequently sent to Rich- 
mond, Virginia ; he was exchanged and discharged from the ser- 
vice, April 3d, 1865. 

Moses M. Gleason was born in Waterloo, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted July 30th, 1862, aged 
twenty years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he died of disease in hos- 
pital, camp near Centerville, Virginia, April 9th, 1863. 

Johx W Gatciiell was born in Ontario county, New York, 
and was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, 
aged twenty-two years, and was in the following battles: Har- 
per's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Morton's 
Ford, Petersburg and Deep Bottom ; he was killed in action at 
Strawberry Plains, Virginia, August 15th, 1S64. 

Fkancis W Hanev was born in Ontario county, New York, 
and was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 4th, lsii-j, 
aged twenty years ; participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 



508 TiiC>ri{ Re<;imext Sew Tone Voli-xteers. 

Virginia, September 13th, 14tb and 15th, 18<;2, and was discharged 
for disability, near Stevensburg, Virginia, January 14th, 1*04. 

John Haines was born in Marathon, Xew York, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged thirty- 
seven years, and was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1S02; he was detached as teamster 
in the wagon train, February 1st, 1863 ; returned to the Regiment 
in the fall of 1864 ; participated in the closing campaigns of the 
war, and was discharged with the Regiment. 

Era R. Hazlet was born in Jerusalem, Xew York, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 12th, 1802, aged thirty 
years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettys- 
burg, Mine Run, Morton's Ford and the Wilderness ; he was absent 
sick, from July 10th to October 30th, 1862, and was severely 
wounded in action in the battle of the wilderness, May 6th, 1864 ; 
he was discharged upon consolidation of the Regiment, Decem- 
ber 25th, 1864. 

Almon Hewitt was born in Greenfield, Xew York, and by 
profession was a clergyman ; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged 
twenty-eight years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Vir- 
ginia, September 13th, 14th and loth, 1862 ; he was detached as 
assistant division forage master, in the winter of 1863, and served 
in that capacity, accompanying the army in all its campaigns 
until the close of the war, when he was discharged with the 
Regiment. 

Robert Holmes was born in England, and by occupation was 
a mechanic ; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged forty years; was 
in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th 
and 15th, 1862, and discharged on account of physical disability 
August 8th, 1863. 

John Hopkins was born in Wayne county, Xew York, and 
was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted July 30th, 1862, aged 
thrity years, and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he was detached 
on duty in the wagon train, February 1st, 1863, and served in 
such capacity with the army in all its campaigns until the close 
of the war, when he was discharged with the Regiment. 



Hiogum'hicat* Sketches. 500 

Ralimi W Hays \v;is born in Bristol, New York, unci by occu- 
pation was a farmer; he enlisted July 21st, 1802, a^od twenty-six 
years, and was discharged, January 15th, 1 s (j : ! . 

Rokkrt Jeffijey was born in Fngland, and hy occupation 
was a farmer ; he enlisted August 11th, ls<;2, aged thirty years, 
and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 
13th, 14th and loth, 1802, and Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 
2d and 3d, 1863; he was severely wounded in action at Gettys- 
burg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863, and was subsequently dis- 
charged on account of wounds. 

Adkam D. Johnson was born in Phelps, New York, and was 
by occupation a laborer; he enlisted August 8th, 1802, aged 
twenty-three years, and was in the following battles : Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, 
Morton's Ford, the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North 
Anna River, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Deep Bot- 
tom, Strawberry Plains, Ream's Station, Boydton Road, Suth- 
erland's Station, Farmville and Appomattox Court-house ; he was 
sick in hospital from September 18th, to November 1st, J 864; 
was appointed Corporal July 1st, 1864, and was discharged with 
the Regiment. 

William B. Knapi' was born in Richmond, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and discharged for disability 
at Chicago, Illinois, November 1st, 1862. 

John W Knapi* was born in Richmond, New York, and was 
by occupation a farmer; lie enlisted August 4th, 1802, aged 
nineteen years, and participated in the battle of Harper's Kerry- 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and loth, 1802 ; he was discharged 
for physical disability at Chicago, Illinois, November 1st, 1802. 

Wallace Kikkr w as born in Gorhani, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation; he enlisted August 7th, 1S02, a^ed twenty- 
five years; lie was severely wounded in action on Maryland 
Heights, Harper's Kerr)', Virginia, Sept. ember 13th, 1802, and 
was discharged on account of wounds received in action at Annapo- 
lis, Maryland, January 7th, IS03. 



510 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

Charles Kents was born in Cayuga county, New York, and 
by occupation was a laborer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged 
twenty-six years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Vir- 
ginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, Penn- 
sylvania, July 2d, 1863 ; he was wounded in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863, and subsequently discharged from 
the service on account of wounds received in action. 

Oscar W Leland was born in Phelps, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged 
thirty-two years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry 
and Gettysburg ; he was ti*ansferred to the Veteran Reserve 
Corps, February 11th, 1864, and subsequently discharged from 
the service. 

Julius Lichult was born in Hopewell, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged nine- 
teen yeai-s, and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, Septem- 
ber 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he was discharged for disability 
at Union Mills, Virginia, March 9th, 1863. 

Henry Loper was born in Springwater, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 
twenty-four years; was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and discharged for disabil- 
ity at Chicago, Illinois, December 11th, 1862. 

George McOmber was born in New York, and by occupation 
was an artist ; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged twenty-eight 
years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, July 2d, 3d and 4th, 1863; he was detailed as commissary 
clerk, September 10th, 1862, and served in such capacity, accom- 
panying the army in all its campaigns, until the close of the war, 
when he was discharged with the Regiment. 

Edwin McComb was born in Gorham, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged twenty- 
one years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg ; 
he was absent, sick, from July 28th to October 30th, 1863 ; and 
was wounded in action at Morton's Ford, February 6th, 1864; he 
rejoined the Regiment, May 24th, 1864, and was in the battles of 



Biographical Sketches. 511 

North Anna River, Toloj3otomoy, Cold Harbor, Petersburg;, 
Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains and Ream's Station ; he was 
absent, siek, from September 6th, 1864, to the winter of 1865, when 
he rejoined the Regiment and participated in the battles of the 
closing campaign of the war, and was discharged with the Regi- 
ment. 

Nelsox H. Munell was born in Bristol, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted July 21st, 1862, aged 
twenty-nine years ; was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and discharged for disa- 
bility, January 12th, 1863. 

Charles W Niles was born in Ontario, New York, and was 
a student ; he enlisted August 12th, 1862, aged eighteen years, 
and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 
14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 
1863 ; he was severely wounded in action at Gettysburg, Penn- 
sylvania, July 2d, 1863 ; rejoined the Regiment subsequently and 
participated in the battles of Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, 
Mine Run and Morton's Ford ; he was detached with provost 
guard at Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and 
served in such capacity until the close of the war, when he was 
discharged with the Regiment. 

Charles H. Proudfit was born in Michigan, and by occupa- 
tion was a farmer; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged twenty-one 
years, and participated in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's 
Ford and the Wilderness ; he was wounded in action in the 
battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864, resulting in the loss of 
the left arm; he was appointed Corporal, November 1st, 1863, 
and discharged December 25th, 1864, on account of wounds 
received in action. 

Oliver Pkkkv was born in Seneca county, New York, and In- 
occupation was a laborer; lie enlisted August 12th, 1862, aged 
twenty-six years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, A ir- 
yinia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863; he was killed in action at Gettys- 
burg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1803. 



b\2 1:26th Rhgjmkxt Xkw York Voluxtekrs. 

Joiix Phillips was born in Gorham, New York, and wan 
by occupation a farmer ; he enlisted August lltli, 1862, aged 
twenty-seven years ; was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Vir- 
ginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d and 3d, 1863, and was killed in action at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863. 

Charles Richards was born in Wayne county, New York, 
and by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 13th, 1862, 
aged twenty-one years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, and Mine Run ; he 
was detailed with provost guard at Division Head-quarters, Jan- 
uary 6th, 1864 ; but was relieved April 4th, 1864, and detached in 
provost guard at Head-quarters, 2d Army Corps ; he served in 
such capacity until the close of the war, when he was discharged 
with the Regiment. 

La Fayette Rafter was born in Phelps, New York, and was 
by occupation a miller; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years, and participated in the following battles : Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, 
Morton's Ford, and the Wilderness ; he was severely wounded in 
action in the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864, and was dis- 
charged with the Regiment. 

Homer Sturdevant was born in Connecticut, and by occupa- 
tion was a farmer; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged eighteen 
years ; was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 
14th and 15th, 1862, and died of disease, at Washington, District 
of Columbia, December 28th, 1862. 

Walter Scott was born in New York, and was a farmer by 
occupation; he enlisted August 24th 1862, aged twenty-six years, 
and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, Sep- 
tember 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he was detached as teamster, 
February 1st, 1863, and served in that capacity until the close of 
the war, and was discharged with the Regiment. 

Herman J. Smith was born in Livonia, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 12th, 1862, aged 
twenty-two years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 



ftroO HM'HICAI, SKKTi'HKS. 51 : > 

September 13th, 14th and loth, 1802; he was discharged i"<>r dis- 
ability at Chicago, Illinois, December 11th, 1802. 

John Sheehan was born in Ireland, and by occupation a far- 
mer; he enlisted July 31st, 1802, aired twenty years, and partici- 
pated in the following battles: Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Pristow Station, Mine Run and Morton's Ford; he 
was absent, sick, from May 3d, 1864, till discharged at Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania, June 5th, 1865; he subsequently re-enlisted in the 
11th United States Infantry, Avas promoted to Sergeant, and 
served until the consolidation of the army in I860, when lie was 
discharged as supernumerary. 

John Sneixino was born in Ontario county, New York, and 
was a laborer by occupation; he enlisted July 21st, 1862, aged 
twenty-two years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 1.1th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Get- 
tysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863; he was killed in action at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863. 

Henry G. Sneixinu was born in England, and by occupation 
was a farmer ; he enlisted August 13th, 1862, aged twenty-six years, 
and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 
14th and 15th, 1862; he was absent, sick in hospital, and subse- 
quently discharged for disability 

Ab. \V Shearman was born in Milo, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted August, 11th, 1802, aged twenty- 
nine years, and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Vir- 
ginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he was discharged 
for disability at Chicago, Illinois, December 11th, 1802. 

Clinton E. Taylor was born in West Bloointield, New York, 
and by occupation was a mechanic; he enlisted August 8th, 1802, 
aged eighteen years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Vir- 
ginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and was absent, sick 
in hospital, at Baltimore, Maryland, from .Inly 25th, 1863, to 
January 0th, 1804; he was detached with provost guard at Head- 
quarters 2d Annv Corps. April 4th, I si; 4, and served in such 
capacity with the army until the close of the war, when he was 
discharged with tin 1 Ken'iincnt. 



514 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

John W Torrence was born in Chemung county, New York, 
and by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 2d, 1862, 
aged eighteen years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg ; he was wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, July 3d, 1863; afterward rejoined the Regiment, and par- 
ticipated in the battles of Mine Run and Morton's Ford ; he was 
detached with provost guard at Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, 
April 4th, 1864, and served in that capacity until the close of the 
war, when he was discharged with the Regiment. 

Warren L. Warner was born in Phelps, New York, and was 
by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 
twenty years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; he was discharged for dis- 
ability at Alexandria, Virginia, April 23d, 1863. 

Albert J. Warner was born in Indiana, and was a farmer by 
occupation; he enlisted August 13th, 1862, aged eighteen years, 
and was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and Morton's Ford ; 
he was detached with provost guard at Head-quarters 2d Army 
Corps, April 4th, 1864, and served with the army in such capa- 
city until the close of the war, when he was discharged with the 
Regiment. 



-&* 



Alonzo Wolven was born in Phelps, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged twenty- 
one years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and Morton's Ford ; he 
was sent to general hospital, sick, May 5th, 1864, but rejoined 
the Regiment in the winter of 1865, and participated in the 
battles of the closing campaign of the war ; he was discharged 
with the Regiment. 

Elmer G. Wilcox was born in East Bloomfield, New York, 
and by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, 
aged forty-two years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Vir- 
ginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he was afterward 
detailed as regimental musician, and served in that capacity until 
the close of the war, when he was discharged with the Regiment. 



BlOlillAl'HKAL ^KETCHES. .")] 5 

Frederick A. Wilcox was born in Wisconsin, and was a far- 
mer 1)}' occupation; he enlisted August 6th, 1802, aged eighteen 
years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettys- 
burg and the Wilderness; be was killed in action, in the battle of 
the Wilderness, May 6th, 1804. 

Peter Wiieelek was born in Washington county, New York, 
and was by occupation a farmer; lie enlisted July 30th, 1862, 
aged eighteen years, and was in the following battles : Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford and Bristow Station; he was 
mortally wounded in action at Bristow Station, Virginia, October 
14th, 1863, and died of wounds received in action, at Alexandria, 
Virginia, October 20th, 1863. 

Thomas J. Wilson was born in Ogdensbnrgh, New York, and 
by occupation was a mechanic; he enlisted August 15th, 1862, 
aged twenty-one years, and participated in the battles of Harper's 
Ferry and Gettysburg ; he was slightly wounded in action at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863, and was detached, and 
placed on duty for recruiting service, July 27th, 1863; he was 
discharged at Washington, District of Columbia, May 20th, 1865, 
to accept an appointment in United States Colored Troops. 

J. M. Wilsox was born in Seneca, New York, and by occupa- 
tion was a farmer; lie enlisted July 28th, 1 8(52, aged nineteen 
years, and participated in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, and Bristow Station ; he was wounded 
and taken prisoner at Bristow Station, Virginia, October 14th, 
1863 ; was subsequently exchanged and discharged at Elvnira, 
May 3<>tli, 1805. 

Aaron Winters was born in Seneca, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a farmer; lie enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged twenty- 
one years, and was in action at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, Septem- 
ber 13th, 15th and 15th, 1802 ; he died of disease, in hospital, 
camp near luion Mills, Virginia, February 25th, 1863. 

(ieouoe Wiujsy was born at Pompey Hill, New York, and by 
occupation was a laborer; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged 
twenty-two years, and was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Sep- 
tember 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; he was detached as teamster. 



51(> 126th Regiment J\ 7 eiv York Volcxteeks. 

February 13th, 1863, and served in such capacity until the close 
of the. war, when he was discharged with the Regiment. 

Edward A. Youxos Mas born in New York, and by occupation 
was a farmer; he enlisted August 5th, 1862, aged nineteen years, 
and was in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 
13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 
2d, 1862; he was severely wounded in action at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 2d, 1863, and was subsequently discharged 
from the service on account of wounds received in action. 

Recruits. 

James Coleman. The writer is unable to give the date of his 
birth or enlistment. At the time of entering; the service he was 
a resident of Seneca county, New York; he joined the Regiment 
April 11th, 1864, and was killed in action at the battle of the 
Wilderness, May 6th, 1864. 

Sidney Fieeo was born in Ontario county, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted September 5th, 1864, for one 
year, and joined the Regiment October 17th, 1864; he partici- 
pated in the battles of the closing campaign of the war, and was 
discharged with the Regiment. 

William W Green was born in Ontario county, New York, 
and by occupation was a druggist; he enlisted September 16th, 
1864, aged thirty-three years, for one year, and joined the Regi- 
ment October 7th, 1864; he was detailed as acting regimental 
hospital steward, and served in that capacity until the close of the 
war, when he was discharged with the Regiment. 



Biographical Skbtcitks. 517 



O O M PAiXY a 



Company G, was raised in various parts of the Senatorial dis- 
trict ; a portion of the men were recruited by Captain Aikins, 
in Seneca county ; a portion by Lieutenant Stewart, in Yates 
county, and the balance by Lieutenant Platt, in Ontario county ; 
the Company organization bears date August 15th, 1862, and its 
original line officers were as follows : 

John F. Aikins, Captain. 

Frederic Stewart, First Lieutenant. 

Saxdford H. Platt, Second Lieutenant. 

Non-commissioned Officers. 
Martin V Stanton. See First Lieutenant Martin V Stan- 
ton, page 385. 

William E. Bishop was born in Ovid, New York, and by 
occupation was a laborer; he enlisted July 28th, 1862, aged 
twenty-three years, and was appointed Sergeant on the organiza- 
tion of the Company; he was in the following battles: Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, 
Morton's Ford, the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North 
Anna, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, 
and Ream's Station ; he was mustered out as supernumerary on 
consolidation of the Regiment, December 25th, 1864. 

Rufus P. Holmes. Sec Second Lieutenant Kuki'S P IIolmk.s, 
page 390. 

James S. Halleniseck was born in Fayette, New York, and 
was a laborer by occupation; he enlisted July 10th, 1862, and 
was appointed Sergeant ; he was reduced to the ranks November 
1st, 1802, and appointed Corporal, April 20th, 1863, serving as 
teamster from the spring of 1863 until the spring of 1864; he 
participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and the Wilderness; 
was wounded in action at the latter place, May 6th, 1864, and 
mustered out as supernumerary on consolidation of the Regiment, 
December 25tli, IK65. 



518 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

Samuel Hughes. See First Lieutenant Samuel Hughes, 
page 381. 

Charles H. Farnsworth was born in Waterloo, New York, 
and by occupation was a shoemaker ; he enlisted August 7th, 

1862, aged thirty- two years, and was appointed Corporal on the 
organization of the Company ; he was in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; was pro- 
moted to Sergeant, November 1st, 1862, and participated in the 
battle of Gettysburg ; was mortally wounded in action, July 2d, 

1863, and died in field hospital at that place, July 9th, 1863. 

Edgar B. Havens was born in Michigan, and was by occupa- 
tion a farmer ; he enlisted July 31st, 1862, and was appointed 
Corporal on the organization of the Company; he was promoted 
to Sergeant November 26th, 1863, and participated in the follow- 
ing battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow 
Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, the Wilderness, Po River, 
Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, Peters- 
burg, Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains and Ream's Station ; he 
was missing in action at Ream's Station, Virginia, August 25th T 

1864, and the writer has been unable to learn of him since that 
date. 

William Berry was born in Waterloo, New York, and was a 
blacksmith by occupation ; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, and was 
appointed Corporal upon the organization of the Company ; he 
participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 
13th, 14th and 15th, 1862 ; was detailed as Brigade blacksmith, 
March 28th, 1863, and serving in that capacity until the close of 
the war, was discharged with the Regiment. 

Robert B. Aikins was born in Newburgh, New York, and by 
occupation was a laborer; he enlisted August 14th, 1862, and 
was appointed Corporal on the organization of the Company; 
participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry ; was promoted to 
Sergeant, January 6th, 1863, and deserted at Centerville, Virginia, 
April 20th, 1863. 

William Crain was born in Hopewell, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 14th, 1862, aged thirty- 
two years, was appointed Corporal, and, participating in the 



Biographical Sketches. 519 

battle of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 
15th, 1862, died of disease at Chicago, Illinois, November 9th, 

1862. 

Martin J. Backman was born in Fayette, New York, and was 
by occupation a painter; he enlisted August 8th, 1862, aged 
twenty-four years ; was appointed Corporal on the organization of 
the Company, and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry ; 
he deserted while on the march to Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in 
1863, and subsequently returned to the Regiment under the 
President's proclamation ; the writer is unable to account for him 
after rejoining the Regiment, but believes he was restored to duty, 
and remained with it until the close of the war. 

Joel E. Burch was born in Seneca Falls, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer ; he enlisted July 26th, 1 862, aged twenty- 
five years ; was appointed corporal, and participated in the battle 
Harper's Ferry; deserted at Chicago, Illinois October 20th, 1862. 

Charles B. Moon was born in Gorham, New York, and was 
by occupation a carriage-maker; he enlisted August 12th, 1862, 
aged thirty years ; was appointed Corporal on the organization of 
the Regiment, and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; was discharged 
for physical disability, at Chicago, Illinois, November 3d, 1862. 

Musician. 

Charles Courier was born in Waterloo, New York, and was 
by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged 
twenty-two years, and serving as musician until the close of the 
war, was discharged with the Regiment. 

PRIVATES. 

John Ai.liger was horn in Waterloo, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a laborer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, and partici- 
pated in the battle of Harper's Ferry; was wounded inaction 
on Maryland Heights, September 13th, 1862, resulting in the loss 
of the right eye ; he was discharged on account of wounds 
received in action, at Chicago, Illinois, October 17th, 1862. 

Charles Andrews was born in Ceneva, New York, and by 
profession was a dentist; he enlisted July 17th, 1862, aged nine- 



520 126tjj Regiment New York Volunteers. 

teen years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and Mor- 
ton's Ford ; he was appointed Corporal, November 3d, 1863; was 
detached in provost guard at Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, April 
4th, 1864, in which capacity he served until the close of the war, 
and was discharged with the Regiment. 

Hamilton Bush was born in Seneca, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation; he enlisted July 23d, 1862, aged twenty- 
three years ; participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Vir- 
ginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862, and died of disease 
at Chicago, Illinois, November 6th, 1862. 

Samuel E. Blaisdell was born in Fayette, New York, and by 
occupation was a wagon maker; he enlisted August 13th, 1862, 
aged eighteen years, and was in the following battles : Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, 
and Morton's Ford. On the 4th of April, 1864, he was detached 
in provost guard at Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, and served 
with the detachment until the close of the war, when he was dis- 
charged with the Regiment. 

Gilbert N Bailey was born in Ovid, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 13th, 1862, aged twenty 
years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Get- 
tysburg ; he was wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
July 2d, 1863 ; transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, Novem- 
ber 23d, of the same year, and subsequently discharged from the 
service. 

Charles Benedict was born in Lockville, New York, and was 
a farmer by occupation ; he enlisted July 31st, 1862, aged eighteen 
years, and was appointed Corporal, October 31st, 1863; he par- 
ticipated in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford and 
the Wilderness, where he was killed in action, May 6th, 1864. 

Patrick Bulger was born in Ireland, and by occujjation was a 
farmer; he enlisted April 7th, 1862, aged forty-two years, and 
participated in the following battles: Harper's Ferry, Gettys- 
burg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, 
the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna and Tolo- 



B 10(11! Al'HJCAL Hh ETCHES. 521 

potoinoy; lie was severely wounded in action at Tolopotomoy, 
May 31st, 1864, and was subsequently discharged from the ser- 
vice on account of wounds. 

William Bain was born in Potter, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer; lie enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged thirty- 
one years, and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry; 
deserted at Chicago, Illinois, October 14th, 1862. 

Jonx Bakko-N was born in Milo, New York, and was a farmer 
by occupation; lie enlisted July 28th, 1862, and participated in 
the following battles: Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, 
Uristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford and the Wilderness ; 
he was wounded in the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864; Mas subse- 
quently transferred to Company E, and discharged with the 
Regiment. 

James Collins was born in Penn Van, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted July 1st, 1862, aged twenty- 
one years, and was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and Mor- 
ton's Ford ; on the 4th of April, 1864, he was detached in provost 
guard at Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, and, serving in that 
capacity until the close of the war, was discharged with the 
Regiment. 

William Ciiusby was born in Phelps, New York, and was by 
occupation a farmer ; he enlisted August 14th, 1862, and partici- 
pated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, September 13th, 14th and 
loth, 1862 ; he was absent, sick, from the Regiment from Decem- 
ber 5th, 1K63, ami was subsequently discharged for physical 
disability. 

John P Cl'lvkk was born in Yates county, New 'i ork, and 
was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 14th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years; participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
and was absent, sick, from December 1st, 1862, to February 12th, 
ism, when he was detailed on duty at Philadelphia, where he 
remained until September, 1864, at which time he rejoined his 
Company, and, taking part in the closing campaign of the war, 
was discharged with the Kei/nnent. 



522 T26th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

Thomas Ceilley was born in Seneca Falls, and by occupation 
was a moulder ; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged twenty-one 
years, and deserted at Geneva, New York, August 25th, 1862. 

Feaxk A. Cole was born in "Waterloo, New York, by occupa- 
tion was a blacksmith, and enlisted June 12, 1862, aged twenty- 
one years ; lie participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry ; was 
severely wounded in action on Maryland Heights, September 13th, 
1862, and was discharged on account of wounds at Centerville, 
Virginia, April 3d, 1863. 

George B. Close was born in Covert, New York, and by 
occupation was a tinsmith; he enlisted July 21st, 1862, aged 
nineteen years, and was in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and Mor- 
ton's Ford ; on the 4th of April, 1864, he was detached in pro- 
vost guard at Head-quarters 2d Army Corps, in which capacity 
he served until the termination of the war, and was discharged 
with the Regiment. 

Thomas Castillo was born in Ireland, and was by occupation 
a shoemaker ; he enlisted August 16th, 1862, aged eighteen years, 
and participated in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Get- 
tysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and Morton's 
Ford ; he was detached in provost guard at Head-quarters 2d 
Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, and, serving in the detachment until 
the close of the war, was discharged with the Regiment. 

IIexey T. Caton was born in Rushville, New York, and was 
by occupation a painter; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and was appointed Corporal, November 1st, 

1862 ; he participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Morton's 
Ford, the Wilderness and Po River ; was wounded in action at 
the latter place, May 10th, 1864, and was subsequently discharged 
from the service on account of wounds. 

John Duffy was born in Ireland, and by occupation was a 
laborer; he enlisted July 29th, 186^, aged thirty-nine years, and 
participated in the battles of Harper's Feny and Gettysburg ; 
he was wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 

1863 ; was transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, February 



Biographical Skeichks. 523 

19th, 1864, in which capacity lie served until the close of the 
war, when he was discharged. 

John Duxnagax was born in Ireland ; was a laborer by occu- 
pation, and enlisted July 29th, 1862, aged thirty-two years ; he 
participated in the following battles: Harper's Ferry, Gettys- 
burg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, 
the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Cold Har- 
bor and Petersburg ; he was killed in action, in front of Peters- 
burg, June 16th, 1864. 

John Dcss was born in New York, and by occupation was a 
laborer; he enlisted August 13th, 1862, aged twenty-three years, 
and was in the battle of Harper's Ferry; on the 21st of April, 
1863, he was detailed on duty in the ambulance corps, and, serv- 
ing in that capacity until the close of the war, was discharged 
with the Regiment. 

William M. Demerest was born in Tyre, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer ; he enlisted July 31st, 1862, aged twenty 
years; was appointed Corporal, December 4th, 1863, and was in 
the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, 
Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, the Wilderness, Po 
River, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor 
and Petersburg; he was severely wounded in action, in front of 
Petersburg, Virginia, June 16th, 1864; rejoined the Company, 
December 20th, 1864, and participated in the battles of Hatcher's 
Run, Boydton Road, Sutherland's Station, Farmville and Appo- 
mattox ; was discharged with the Regiment at the close of the 
war. 

Floyd Davis was born in Ulster, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a boatman; he enlisted August 13th, 1802, aged 
twenty-eight years, and was in the battle of Harper's Ferry; he 
deserted at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, September 25th, isc>2 ; 
was returned to the Regiment under arrest, September 23d, 1S63, 
and participated in the battle at Morton's Ford, February 4th, 
lstit; i»n the 4th of April, 1H(U, he was detached in provost 
guard at Headquarters, 2d Army Corps, and, serving in the 
detachment until the termination of the war, was discharged with 
the Regiment. 



524 126th Regiment Mew York Volunteers. 

Patkick Dwyee was boni in Utica, New York, and was In- 
occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 14th, 1862, aged eighteen 
years, and participated in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, 
Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and Mor- 
ton's Ford ; he was detached on duty with provost guard at Head- 
quarters 2d Army Corps, April 4th, 1864, in which capacity he 
served until the close of the war, and was discharged with the 
Regiment. 

Frank Ddnsagan was born in Ireland ; by occupation a laborer, 
and enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged twenty-one years; he par- 
ticipated in the following battles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and Morton's Ford ; 
on the 4th of April, 1864, he was detached on duty in provost 
guard at Head-quarters 2d Army Corps ; served in that capacity 
during the campaign of the summer, and was missing in action 
(probably killed), at Ream's Station, Virginia, August 25th, 1864. 

Daniel Day was born in Benton, New York, and was a farmer 
by occupation; he enlisted August 13th, 1862, aged twenty two 
years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry, and Gettysburg ; 
he was mortally wounded in action, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
July 3d, 1863, and died of wounds in field hospital, at that place, 
July 20th, 1863. 

George Fuselman was born in Fayette, New York, and by 
occupation was a laborer; he enlisted July 15th, 1862, aged 
eighteen years ; was in the battle of Harper's Ferry ; accom- 
panied the Regiment in its campaign until April 20th, 1864, but 
was not on duty in consequence of loss of voice ; he was absent, 
sick, from April 20th, 1864, until the winter of 1865, at which 
time he rejoined the Company, participated in the closing battles 
of the war, and was discharged with the Regiment. 

De Witt C. Farrington. First Lieutenant De Witt C. Far- 
rington, page 379. 

Adriance H. Foster was born in Sandusky, Ohio, and was a 
farmer by occupation; he enlisted August 15th, 1862, aged 
twenty-three years, and, participating in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, was severely wounded in action on Maryland Heights. 



Biographical Sketches. 5 2 5 

September 13th, 1862; he was discharged on account of wounds 
received in action, at Annapolis, Maryland, March 5th, 1803. 

Byron K. Feagles was born in Benton, Xcw York, and was 
by occupation a clerk; he enlisted July 21st, 1862, aged eighteen 
years, and participated with the Regiment in the following bat- 
tles : Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, 
Mine Run and Morton's Ford ; he was mortally wounded in 
action at Morton's Ford, on February 4th, 1864, and died of 
wounds, February 7th, 1864. 

Charles II. Finger was born in Ontario county, Xew York, 
and by occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 11th, 1862, 
aged eighteen years, and was in the following battles : Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, 
Morton's Ford, the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North 
Anna and Tolopotomoy ; he was severely wounded in action at 
Tolopotomoy, May 30th, 1864, and was subsequently discharged 
from the service on account of wounds. 

Jacob Goodsell was born in Germany, and was a farmer by 
occupation; he enlisted July 24th, 1862, aged thirty-two years, 
and, participating in the battle of Harper's Ferry, was discharged 
for physical disability at Union Mills, Virginia, February 3d, 
1863; he subsequently re-enlisted in an engineer Regiment, and, 
serving with it until the close of the war, was discharged from 
the service. 

George B. Goodalk was born in Phelps, Xew York, and In- 
occupation was a carpenter; he enlisted August 14th, 1862, aged 
twenty-seven years; was appointed Corporal, November 1st, 
1862, promoted to Sergeant, April 20th, 1863, and participated 
in the following battles: Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn 
Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, the Wilderness. 
Po River, Spottsylvania, Xorth Anna., Cold Harbor and Peters- 
burg ; he was wounded in action in front of Petersburg, \ irginia, 
June 16th, 1864, and mustered out as supernumerary on consoli- 
dation of the Regiment, December 2.Hh, 1S64. 

William Cra< v was born in Pennsvlvania, and was by occu- 
pation a farmer; he enlisted August ]4th, 1S62, aged twenty one 



52G 126th Regiment J\ t ew York Volunteers. 

years, and, participating in the battle of Harper's Ferry, deserted 
at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, September 25th, 1862. 

Amos P, Hendricks was born in Fayette, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged 
twenty-five years, and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and 
Gettysburg; he deserted at Frederick City, Maryland, July 10th, 
1863, and returned to the Regiment, February 15th, 1864; the 
writer is unable to account for him after the latter date. 

Edward Hudson was born in Waterloo, New York, and was 
by occupation a moulder; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged 
twenty years, and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry ; 
he was absent, sick, from November 24th, 1862, until near the 
close of the war, and the writer is unable to state the date of his 
discharge. 

George Hill was born in Seneca Falls, New York, and was a 
laborer by occupation; he enlisted August 7th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and was in the battle of Harper's Ferry ; he 
was on duty in the pioneer corps, from the winter of 1863 to the 
spring of 1864, when he rejoined the Regiment and participated 
in the following battles : the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylva- 
nia, North Anna, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, and the front of 
Petersburg ; he was missing, and probably killed in action, at the 
left of Petersburg, Virginia, June 22d, 1864. 

George Henry was born in Penn Yan, New York, and by 
occupation was a laborer; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years, and, participating in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, deserted at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, September 25th, 
1862 ; he was returned to the Regiment under arrest September 
28th, 1863, and the writer is unable to account for him after this 
date. 

Lewis Hammond was born in Romulus, New York, and was by 
occupation a teamster; he enlisted July 16th, 1862, aged twenty- 
five years ; participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, and 
deserted at Annapolis, Maryland, September 22d, 1862. 

James Harper was born in Yarick, New York, and by occupa- 
tion was a farmer ; he enlisted August 4th, 1862, aged eighteen 
years, and participated in the following battles: Harper's Ferry, 



Biographical Skktciies. .">27 

Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Rristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's 
Ford, the Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolo- 
potomoy, Cold Harbor and Petersburg ; lie was appointed Corporal, 
March 4th, 1863, promoted subsequently to Sergeant, and to 
color-bearer, June 9th, 1S64 ; he was wounded and fell into the 
hands of the enemy, while carrying the colors of the Regiment in 
the battle at the left of Petersburg, June 22d, 1864, and died in 
rebel prison at Andersonville, Georgia, September 10th, 1864. 

William Humphrey was born in Ontario county, Xew York, 
and was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted August 16th, 1862, 
aged twenty-five years, and participated in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry ; he was detailed in the wagon train in the winter of 1 863, and 
served in that capacity until the close of the war when he was 
discharged with the Regiment. 

David J. Hoffman was born in Geneva, Xew York, and was 
by occupation a farmer; he enlisted June 21st, 1862, aged nine- 
teen years, and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, and 
Gettysburg; he was wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, July 3d, 1863, and discharged on account of wounds, at 
New York city, October 14th, 1864. 

Peter P Haverland was born in Cayuga, New York, and In- 
occupation was a painter ; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, and while 
in camp at Geneva, Xew York, was arrested as a deserter from 
the 8th Xew York Cavalry, ami taken to that Regiment. 

John Kiley was born in Belfast, Ireland, and was by occupa- 
tion a laborer; lie enlisted July 18th, 1862, aged thirty-five years. 
and was in the following battles: Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, 
Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, .Aline Run, Morton's Ford, the 
Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Vnna, Tolopotomoy, 
Cold Harbor and Petersburg ; he was killed in action at Peters- 
burg, Virginia, June Kith, isc>4. 

Ciiaki.es R. Risk. See Commissary Sergeant Ciiaui.ks R. 
Link, page 304. 

Thompson Lo\<;sti;ket was born in Seneca county, Xew York, 
by occupation a farmer, and enlisted August iltli, 1*62, :\^vt\ 
twenty-three years; he was missing in action at Roydton Road, 
October 29th, 1*64 ; the writer has been unable to learn of him 



528 J:26ru Rfajimest Xew York Volunteers. 

after this date, and is not able to state what battles he was in, 
but thinks lie was with the Regiment most of the time from its 
organization, and participated with it in action. 

William Long was born in Ireland, and was by occupation a 
laborer; he enlisted August 9th, 1862, aged twenty one years, 
and was in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg; he 
was wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 
1863 ; subsequently transferred to the invalid corps, and, serving 
in that caj>acity until the termination of the war, he was dis- 
charged from the service. 

Daniel Mead was born in Dundee, N ew York, and by occu- 
pation was a laborer; he enlisted July 26th, 1862, aged twenty- 
five years, and, participating in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
deserted at Centerville, Virginia, June 25th, 1863, while awaiting 
the sentence of a court-martial ; he was returned to the Regiment 
September 28th, 1863; was sentenced to one year's confinement 
at hard labor, with ball and chain, on fortifications, and died, at 
Washington, District of Columbia, December 12th, 1864. 

Martin Madden was born in Ireland, and by occupation was 
a fanner; he enlisted August 12th, 1864, aged twenty-four years; 
participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, and deserted at 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, September 25th, 1862. 

John Mokean was born in Ireland, and was by occupation a 
laborer: he enlisted August 6th, 1802, aged twenty-one years, 
and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg; 
he was wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 
1863, and subsequently discharged from the service on account of 
wounds. 

De Witt C. Maevix was born in Auburn, Xew York, and by 
occupation was a boatman; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged 
thirty-two years, and, participating in the battle of Harper's 
Ferry, deserted at Chicago, Illinois, October 18th, 1862. 

Peecival W Mitchell was born in Fayette, New York, and 
was by occupation a farmer; he enlisted July 17th, 1862, aged 
twentv-two years, and was in the following battles : Harper's 
Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford L and Bristow Station ; on the 
16th of October, 1863, he was detached on duty with the Rhode 



Fiio a h'A phi c ' .1 l Sketches. 5 2 9 

Island Battery, and served with it until February ICth, 1865, 
when he was returned to his Company, appointed Sergeant, and 
participating in the final campaign of the war, was discharged 
with the Regiment. 

Asa Mott was born in New York, and was by occupa- 
tion a clerk ; he enlisted August 14th, 1862, aged twenty-three 
years, and participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, Vir- 
ginia, September 13th, 14th and 15th, 1862; died of disease at 
Chicago, Illinois, December 20th, 1862. 

Chari.es Norton was born in Waterloo, New York, and by 
occupation was a farmer ; he enlisted August 6th, 1862, aged 
twenty-one years ; participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
and was detached as musician, in which capacity he served until 
the termination of the war, and was discharged with the Regi- 
ment. 

Clinton Pasco. See Second Lieutenant Clinton Pasco, page 
301. 

Norman Potts was born in Benton, New York, and was a 
farmer by occupation ; he enlisted August 14th, 1862, aged 
twenty-five years ; participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, 
and deserted at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, September 25th, 1862; 
he was returned to the Regiment in the fall of 1863, and died in 
camp near Stevensburg, Virginia, January 12th, 1864. 

Jamkk Place was born in Penn Yan, New York, and by occu- 
pation was a farmer; he enlisted July 31st, 1862, and was in the 
battles of Harper's Kerry and Gettysburg; he was severely 
wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3d, 1863, 
and subsequently discharged from the service on account of 
wounds. 

Gi;oi;<a<: R. Redman was born in New York, and was by occu- 
pation a laborer ; he enlisted July 14th, 1862, aged forty-two years, 
and was arrested as a deserter from the 8th New York Cavalry, 
while in camp at Geneva, and taken to his Regiment. 

Ai.i'i:i:i> Uednei: was born in New York, and by occupation 
was a boatman; he enlisted July 22d, 1862, aged twenty-two 
vears, and was in act ion at Harper's Ferry ; he is reported on the 



530 126th Regiment New York Volunteers. 

rolls of his Company as absent, sick, from November 24th, 1864, 
and the writer has been unable to learn anything definite as to 
his military history, previously, but presumes he was with the 
Regiment until that date, and participated in its battles. 

Midfre